Photo Booth

New Photo Booth port for iPhone released on Cydia

The last Photo Booth port for iPhone that we covered didn’t worked very well. It featured only a handful of effects, and it was susceptible to crashes. To add insult to injury, the legality of such a port has been debated, because it redistributes assets from Apple.

Thankfully, CoolStar, the iOS hacker and jailbreak mainstay, has devised his own version of Photo Booth, and it features none of the caveats listed above. Check inside as we walk through this latest version of Photo Booth for the iPhone.

How to get a semi-working Photo Booth port on the iPhone

Photo Booth—it’s one of the iPad only apps that sort of gets lost in the shuffle when talking about stock apps. It’s an app that people play with when they first get their iPad’s only to never really touch it again. Despite that, there always seems to be a concerted effort amongst members of the jailbreak community to port Photo Booth to the iPhone.

Two years ago, Photo Booth was ported to the iPhone 4S with much fan fare. Today, it’s been ported to iPhone’s running iOS 7. The good news is that it more or less works like you’d expect. The bad news is that, at least in its current form, it’s a buggy mess devoid of many of the effects found on the iPad version. Have a look at our video walkthrough past the break to see what I mean.

A hands-on look at iOS 7 on the iPad

iOS 7 beta 2 is the first iOS 7 to feature support for Apple’s iconic tablet, and we’ve got a hands-on demonstration of how it looks and feels. The first word that came to my mind when I initially fired up iOS 7 on the iPad was “modern.” The iPad feels more spacious, and lightweight with iOS 7 installed. Whereas iOS 6 felt heavy and weighed down by skeuomorphism, iOS 7 feels light free.

I think you’re going to like the way that iOS 7 looks and performs on the iPad. Check out our full video demonstration inside…

Photo Booth Ported to the iPhone 4S

When Apple released the iPad 2 last year, the company boasted its new dual-core processor and front and rear-facing cameras. These improvements to the iPad 2 meant that App Store developers could release more elaborate and intensive applications for the tablet. Apple also took advantage of the opportunity themselves by launching a native Photo Booth application for the iPad 2.

Despite having nearly the same specifications as the iPad 2, including a dual-core processor and higher megapixel cameras, Apple chose not to include an iPhone version of Photo Booth on the iPhone 4S. But, that’s all about to change…