Drag and drop iTunes tracks to Google Play Music using new Chrome lab feature

By Christian Zibreg on Mar 26, 2014

Google’s official Play Music app lets you access both Google’s subscription-based All Access and standard music services on your iPhone and iPad, but Apple-imposed restrictions prevent your iOS device from actually uploading song files to Google’s music locker in the cloud.

Desktop users can upload their music using Google’s Music Manager application for Mac and Windows PCs, but now there’s a ridiculously easy way of adding those iTunes tracks to Google Play, using only the Chrome browser.

Now available in the Labs section of the Google Play Music web interface, and only on the Chrome web browser, this nicely done web app lets you upload individual tracks to the cloud literally by dragging and dropping them from iTunes, Windows Media Player or folders… Read More

 

Google Now cards now rolling out on desktop in Chrome for Mac

By Christian Zibreg on Mar 24, 2014

Rich desktop notifications have been available in Google’s Chrome browser for the Mac for some time now, provided you were on the Canary channel where Google hosts early and unstable alpha releases of its browser. The normals, however, had to wait until desktop notifications for the Now cards made their way into the stable Chrome channel.

According to Google itself, that day is today – people on stable Chrome releases should start seeing Google Now alerts being pushed to their Macs and PCs. The handy alerts are nested right inside the browser’s notification center that sits in your Mac’s status bar (bottom-right if you’re using Windows)… Read More

 

Geohot wins $150,000 for exposing ChromeOS exploits

By Cody Lee on Mar 15, 2014

Google held its Pwnium 4 security competition last week at CanSecWest in Vancouver, Canada. The day-long event ended with hundreds of thousands of dollars being awarded to hackers who demonstrated exploits in Google Chrome. And believe it or not, $150,000 of that went to Geohot.

For those not familiar with the name, Geohot has picked up a number of headlines over the past 7 years. After hacking the iPhone he took his talents to the PS3, where he caused enough chaos to get sued by Sony. And he’s since been spotted at Facebook, iOSDevCamp and various other places… Read More

 

How to make Chrome your default browser on iOS

By Sébastien Page on Feb 2, 2014

It took several years for Apple to allow third party web browsers in the App Store, and when it finally did, many users rushed to download Chrome, Google’s own browser based on Apple’s WebKit, and basically a sophisticated wrapper for mobile Safari.

While users can now use various web browsers on iOS, Safari still is the default one. It means that if you open links sent to you via email or text message, the links will automatically open in Safari.

What if you want Chrome to be the default browser on iOS? Read More

 

How to send iMessages from any web browser on any operating system

By Joe Rossignol on Jan 29, 2014

Following in the footsteps of successful cross-platform messaging services like BlackBerry Messenger and WhatsApp, iMessage was released in late 2011 as a way for iPhone, iPad and iPod touch users to send unlimited messages between each other. Apple then went on to release Messages for OS X Mountain Lion the following year, allowing Mac users to join the conversation.

But what if you’re a Windows or Linux user, or you’re away on travel without access to the Mac you normally use? Worry not, as Remote Messages has been updated with support for iOS 7 and 64-bit devices. The popular jailbreak tweak developed by Beast Soft is a browser-based front end for the Messages app on iOS devices. Find out what that means ahead…  Read More

 

Google launches Chrome apps for iOS

By Christian Zibreg on Jan 28, 2014

Just when you thought web apps were officially dead on mobile, the Internet giant Google has expanded the reach of its ecosystem by announcing Tuesday that it’s bringing Chrome web applications to iOS and Android smartphones and tablets. Previously, Chrome apps were accessible via desktop computers only.

Conventional wisdom has it that the main advantage of web apps is that they’re written using standard web technologies – HTML5, CSS and Javascript.

In turn, web apps run without major issues on any computing platform with a standards-compliant web browser. I know what you must be thinking, ‘Apple offered web app development for the iPhone and it didn’t work out for them’, right?

Google thought of that, too: an early developer preview of its tool allows developers to actually compile their Chrome web apps as native applications which can be easily distributed through Apple’s App Store and Google’s own Play store… Read More

 

Google posts Chrome iOS update with translation feature, data compression and more

By Christian Zibreg on Jan 27, 2014

Two weeks ago, Google announced it would be releasing a new Chrome version with a built-in translation feature and data compression engine capable of reducing cellular data usage by up to fifty percent. Today, a free Chrome update has just gone live in the App Store.

It brings the aforementioned Translate and Reduce Data Usage features, along with an improved New Tab Page to make searching faster and easier and the usual assortment of stability fixes and security improvements… Read More

 

Chrome 32 for Mac: noisy tab indicators, supervised users, stronger malware protection

By Christian Zibreg on Jan 16, 2014

If you prefer Google’s Chrome over Apple’s Safari on your Mac desktops and notebooks, good news: the search monster yesterday updated the browser with a few new features that help restrict kids’ use of the Internet while boosting their parents’ protection from malware.

I was instantly sold on the incredibly useful noisy tab indicators that make it easier to figure out which tab sound is coming from.

Now, why didn’t I think of that? Chrome 32 for Mac, Windows and Linux is now available for download and there’s a detailed description of the new features right below… Read More

 

Check out Google Now integration on your Mac in latest Chrome Canary release

By Christian Zibreg on Jan 16, 2014

CNET reported last summer that Google Now cards were heading to Google’s Chrome browser for the Mac. Six months later, Google releases a brand new Google Canary build with Google Now cards functionality nested right inside the browser’s notification center which sits in your Mac’s status bar.

Although not all Google Now cards are available in this alpha release of Chrome, the search company has integrated a few of the most popular ones like sports scores, real-time weather updates, and travel information… Read More

 

Chrome for iOS updated with data compression, Google Translate

By Cody Lee on Jan 15, 2014

Google announced an update for its mobile Chrome browser today, which will bring the app to version 32. The update brings about a handful of new features including data compression, Google’s popular Translate feature and more.

The search giant says that the new data compression feature can reduce data usage by up to 50% while browsing the web on your device, using Chrome. And with Google Translate for iOS, you can translate full webpages on the go… Read More

 

Google puts Chrome App Launcher in Mac’s Dock

By Christian Zibreg on Dec 11, 2013

Chrome Apps may have debuted as simple website shortcuts, but Google has quickly expanded on the initial capabilities so these things now feel and behave much like rich, native apps, as opposed to your typical clunky and somewhat slow web app. Today’s Chrome Apps are packaged as native code, can work offline, access your computer’s local storage and more.

There are some really fine Chrome Apps out there that will make you question your preconceived notions of what a web app can do and now Google has created a home for them, right in your Mac’s Dock.

Introducing Chrome App Launcher which puts Chrome Apps for your desktop right in your Dock. Just click its icon and up pops a grid of all Chrome Apps that you’ve installed on your system. Read on for full details… Read More

 

How to easily download any image on the Mac using Chrome

By Jeff Benjamin on Dec 4, 2013

Have you ever tried to right-click on an image in order to save it, only to find that the option to save the image is no where to be found? From time to time you’ll likely run into such an issue, and in many cases it has to do with how a particular web page is designed (css, etc.).

There’s a particular Chrome extension that I use for the Google Chrome browser called Image Downloader. This extension makes it easy to quickly identify all images on a particular web page. You can then download those images in batch form or individually.

Image Downloader probably isn’t an extension that you’ll use on a day-to-day basis, but it’s been instrumental to me in those instances where I needed to quickly download a stubborn image. Have a look at our video walkthrough as I step through the entire image downloading process using this great extension. Read More

 

Google working on Chrome apps support for Android and iOS

By Cody Lee on Dec 4, 2013

Google is reportedly preparing a beta release of a toolkit that will help developers create native Chrome apps for iOS and Android. The move is said to be a part of a bigger initiative to bring based Chrome packaged desktop apps to mobile platforms.

The news comes from a recently discovered GitHub repository called Mobile Chrome Apps, which was created by Google software developer Michal Mocny. A search on Google Groups confirms the project, which is slated to enter beta in Jan. 2014… Read More

 

Hands-free ‘OK Google’ search comes to your Mac

By Christian Zibreg on Nov 27, 2013

Yours truly is a huge fan of Google Now so it goes without saying I’ve long been yearning for that kind of hands-free voice searching on my Mac desktops and notebooks. Available via Google’s free Search app for the iPhone and iPad since November 5, the cool feature dutifully listens to the ‘OK Google’ keyword which initiates a voice search. It’s severely crippled, too, as ‘OK Google’ only works if the Search app is running, as opposed to the always-on implementation on the Nexus 5 and Moto X.

Blame it on Apple’s strict policy that prohibits third-parties from listening to the microphone input in the background. Well, there are no such restrictions on Macs (yet) and Google has taken advantage of the fact and released a nice little extension for its browser allowing you to talk to Google (when you’re using Chrome) hands-free, no typing required… Read More

 

Chrome for iOS updated with synced autofill, faster related image search

By Cody Lee on Nov 20, 2013

In line with its announcement last week, Google has updated its Chrome browser for iOS this afternoon, bringing the app to version 31.0.1650.18. The update includes several bug fixes, and a couple of handy new features.

The headlining new feature is called synced autofill, and it will auto-complete forms on the web that you’ve previously filled out while logged in under the same Google account. And there’s also a new long-press function… Read More

 

Google Chrome for iOS update adds synced autofill

By Cody Lee on Nov 15, 2013

Chrome users will be happy to hear that Google has announced that it’s adding the autofill feature from its desktop and Android app to the iOS client today, making it much easier to fill out online forms.

And the feature will of course sync information with your Google account. So as long as you’re logged in on your iOS device, you will be able to auto-complete forms that you’ve already filled out elsewhere… Read More

 

The best way to capture an entire web page as an image in OS X

By Jeff Benjamin on Nov 8, 2013

I don’t always find it necessary to capture entire web pages as images, but when I do, there’s one surefire go-to tool that I use — Awesome Screenshot. A browser extension available for Safari, Chrome, and Firefox, Awesome Screenshot is the best way to quickly capture, annotate, and save a full image of a web page.

I find this extension extra handy when comparing Geekbench scores side by side. In fact, I used it in our latest Geekbench comparison of the Nexus 5 and iPhone 5s.

Of course, it has many other uses; people like to use it for archiving web pages, cropping, sharing annotated images, blurring out sensitive data, etc. The best thing about Awesome Screenshot is that it runs right in your browser, so it reduces the amount time that you need for a dedicated image editor. Read More

 

Google to add account authentication for saved passwords to Chrome for Mac

By Christian Zibreg on Nov 4, 2013

The great thing about Apple’s iOS 7 password syncing feature is that setting up iCloud Keychain on your device with an iCloud Security Code prevents anyone from gaining access to your saved web passwords by going to Settings > Safari > Passwords & AutoFill > Saved Passwords. That is, viewing any saved entry there requires providing an iCloud Security Code, or your account password on the Mac.

This added layer of protection ensures I can’t steal your iPhone while it isn’t auto-locked and use the Settings app to hijack your online identities in a snap. Not so much with Chrome for Mac. Currently, Google’s browser does not require any form of authentication to reveal saved passwords. The Internet giant is aware of the problem and is aiming to deploy enhanced security for saved passwords in an upcoming Chrome build… Read More

 

Chrome’s share of total iOS web traffic doubles since last year

By Christian Zibreg on Oct 11, 2013

Google’s Chrome went from zero market share to becoming the world’s most popular desktop web browser in just five years. And since its release on Apple’s iOS platform in June 2012, Chrome’s been consistently the top third-party browser on the App Store (free download), making its way on a lot of people’s Home screens. Research firm Chitika estimates that Chrome’s share of web traffic coming from the iPhone, iPod touch and iPad devices has doubled since June 2012 launch.

Just 24 hours into its launch Chrome became the App Store’s most popular free app and grabbed an estimated 1.5 percent share of total iOS web traffic. Today, Google’s iOS browser accounts for three percent  of total iOS web traffic… Read More

 

Chrome’s incognito mode is flawed in latest iOS 7 update

By Jeff Benjamin on Oct 3, 2013

For all of you folks buying gifts in secret for your loved ones, beware; Chrome’s incognito mode has a flaw that allows users to recover searches performed in private. A new video has surfaced showcasing the flaw in action, and iDB has independently verified, that indeed, Incognito mode on the iOS version of Chrome ain’t so incognito.

The problem occurs when searching in incognito mode and then exiting incognito mode and performing a web search on Google.com. The issue doesn’t occur when exiting Google.com and searching using Chrome’s Omnibox.

Incognito mode has never been exactly fail proof on iOS, but this is still a pretty embarrassing gaffe for Google. Read More

 
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