Xcode

Apple’s school for app developers has opened its doors to students in Naples, Italy

Apple’s European iOS App Development Center at the University of Naples has opened its doors to students on Thursday. British newspaper The Guardian visited Apple’s school for programmers in the days leading up to the launch, showing off the facility in a batch of photos. The project was formally announced in January 2016. Specialized curriculum gives students practical skills and training on developing iPhone, iPod touch and iPad apps.

Developer manages to run Windows 95 on an Apple Watch

A developer for the Apple Watch has found a way to emulate the Windows 95 operating system experience on Apple’s flagship wearable accessory.

Albeit nothing more than a concept, it really does show off how powerful the Apple Watch’s internal hardware really is. This is just one of those things you have to see to believe.

How to install Kodi on iOS 9 without jailbreaking

Kodi is one of those apps that I love using on my jailbroken devices, but did you know that it can also be easily installed and used on a non-jailbroken device? I just finished installing Kodi on my iPad Pro in a matter of minutes. Although it’s not as straightforward as installing it from Cydia, it can still easily be done with a bit of patience.

I use Kodi to stream live local channels to my iOS devices via an HDHomeRun box, but I also use it to stream video from an external drive hooked up to my AirPort extreme. Needless to say, it’s a great app that’s not just limited to jailbroken device thanks to Xcode 7.

How to sideload f.lux on your iPhone or iPad with Xcode 7

The folks over at f.lux have released a sideloadable version of their popular utility for all iOS devices running iOS 9. The utility, which was once limited to jailbroken iPhones, can now be installed on any iOS 9 device, even the new iPad Pro, without a jailbreak.

f.lux is a utility that allows your iPhone to automatically adjust the screen temperature according to the time of day. It’s a utility that I use every day on my Mac, and it makes working on my computer in a dark environment much easier on my eyes. The same premise applies to iOS devices as well.

Would you be interested in using f.lux on your iPhone? Check out the full tutorial inside.

How to watch BBC iPlayer on Apple TV

Last month, an open source app called Auntie Player was released to access on demand programs from the BBC. This app can be sideloaded on an Apple TV and used to watch BBC on demand content and even live content.

I tested out Auntie Player today, and it worked as expected. Keep in mind, however, that you’re supposed to be in the UK in order to properly access its content. There are ways to access BBC iPlayer outside of the UK, but we cannot endorse those methods.

Still, we understand that many of our UK-based readers would be interested in accessing BBC iPlayer on the Apple TV, so in this post we’re going to show you how.

How to play MAME arcade games on Apple TV

Along with being able to play classic Nintendo and Sega games on your Apple TV, you can also play classic arcade titles. Doing so is made possible by a port of MAME, which stands for Multiple Arcade Machine Emulator. Unfortunately there isn’t yet a GitHub page setup for the MAME tvOS port, but the same developer that created the MAME emulator that we showed you a while back has made the full Xcode project available for download.

How to install a web browser on Apple TV

Sideloading the tvOSBrowser that we reported on earlier is easy, it just takes a bit of massaging to make it all work. You’ll need to be familiar with our standard sideloading tutorial for sideloading apps, but there’s one additional step that you’ll have to take before it all comes together. In this tutorial, we’ll show you all that’s involved in a hands-on step-by-step video.

How to take an Apple TV screenshot

Unlike an iPhone or an iPad, it’s not as easy to take a screenshot on the Apple TV, but it can be done. On the iPhone, it’s just a matter of pressing the Home and Sleep button at the same time, but on the Apple TV, it requires a USB-C Cable, a Mac, and Xcode. In other words, it takes a lot more effort to take screenshots of tvOS than it does iOS.

How to add f.lux-like screen gamma settings to a non-jailbroken iPhone

Gamma Thingy is a new app available on GitHub from developer Thomas Finch. It allows non-jailbroken iPhone owners running iOS 9 to change their screen gamma values for f.lux-like functionality. What’s remarkable about this little app is that you don’t need to be jailbroken to run it, and it works system wide.

Lots of users like f.lux, because it makes viewing a backlit screen in less than ideal lighting conditions easier on the eyes. I use f.lux on my Mac, and it makes working at night more tolerable. I also use f.lux on my jailbroken devices from time to time.

Gamma Thingy can be installed on your iPhone running iOS 9 today via a simple sideloading process. Check out this post to learn what’s required.

How to sideload apps on iOS 9

As you’ve likely heard, iOS 9 allows you to sideload apps on to your iPhone or iPad using Xcode 7. This means that you can find an open source app, load it into Xcode, and deploy it to your device, bypassing the App Store in the process. All of this can be done without a paid developer account.

This essentially amounts to Apple “opening up” iOS to all apps. All it takes is a little knowledge of Xcode 7, an iPhone or iPad running iOS 9, and a little bit of time. Of course, there are always variations and one-offs that appear from time to time, but for the most part, sideloading apps is easy. In this post, we’ll show you how.

Apple educates developers on validating Xcode downloads following XcodeGhost malware attack

A new type of attack called XcodeGhost is wreaking something of a mini-havoc in the App Store, injecting its malware payload into popular iPhone and iPad apps and prompting Apple to pull the infected apps.

The malware itself is pretty harmful—it collects and sends information about your device—but the method of spreading is cunning. Rather than target the App Store itself, attackers have distributed hacked versions of Xcode, Apple’s tool required for iOS and OS X development.

As Xcode is a multi-gigabyte download, developers in countries like China where Internet speeds are slow have downloaded these modified Xcode builds from non-Apple sources without realizing a hacked Xcode injects malware when compiling apps.

This morning, Apple issued an email to developers providing an update on the XcodeGhost situation while laying out easy-to-follow instructions for checking if their Xcode copy has been tampered with.

Apple begins removing apps infected with the XcodeGhost malware

Apple is fully aware of the recent malware attack on several of its App Store apps, according to an Apple rep that spoke with Reuters via email. It has begun removing all known apps that have been infected, and is working with developers affected by the breach.

XcodeGhost, as we told you about yesterday, is malware that is attached to several legitimate App Store apps. The apps were infected due to using an illegitimate version of Xcode, which was downloaded from a third-party server in China. Most of the infected apps are of Chinese origin, but there are a few apps impacted, WeChat to name one, that are popular in other territories.