Time Machine

How to use Time Machine on your Mac – the full roundup

Over the last several months, we’ve revisited Time Machine, the backup utility present in OS X. We’ve showed you everything from performing an initial Time Machine setup, to encrypting Time Machine backups, to restoring specific files from those backups.

Time Machine is a great tool that every OS X user should become intimately familiar with, and in this roundup, we’ll revisit each of the topics covered over the last couple of months.

How to create a partition on your Time Machine external hard drive

Time Machine is extremely easy to use, and its flexibility makes it a great solution for keeping your Mac backed up safely. But with external drives being as large as they are, you may wish to use some of the space on your Time Machine drive for basic file storage.

There are many ways to go about this, but one of the best ways is to simply create a separate partition on your external drive. By doing this, you have a dedicated partition for file storage, and a dedicated partition for your Time Machine backups.

Although it’s possible to store files on your Time Machine partition, in my opinion, it’s a better practice to keep them separated. In this fourth entry into our Time Machine tutorial series, I’ll show you how simple it is to create a second partition on your Time Machine external drive.

How to view and restore specific files using Time Machine

Time Machine is very useful, because not only does it allow you to back up all of your user data, but it also allows you to selectively view and restore portions of that data, even down to individual files.

In this tutorial, the forth in our series about Time Machine, I’m going to show you to how to view and restore an individual file using a Time Machine backup.

How to encrypt Time Machine backups

In our second Time Machine tutorial, we’re going to show you how to encrypt a Time Machine backup. Encrypting your backups is extremely easy and straightforward. All you need to do is select a single check box in order to enable encryption and enter a password. In this tutorial, we’ll show you how to do it, and why you should consider encrypting your backups.

How to set up Time Machine on Mac OS X

Time Machine is a Mac utility that allows you to automate hourly, daily, and weekly backups on an external drive that’s connected directly to your Mac or via a local network. It’s seen as the first line of defense against data loss, and features simple setup.

Setting up Time Machine, in its most basic configuration, is extremely easy. All you need to do is launch the Time Machine preferences, turn on Time Machine, select a Backup Disk, and you’re pretty much set.

Of course, there’s much more to Time Machine than just the initial setup, but in this first post in our Time Machine tutorial series for OS X, we’ll cover some of the basic set up options.

Second Yosemite update looms: Wi-Fi fixes, iCloud Drive in Time Machine and more

Despite all the talk of a problematic decline in software quality, Apple is feeling your pain and isn’t standing still.

Currently in testing, a second update to OS X Yosemite is due later this week. First of all, Mac OS X 10.10.2 apparently squashes that annoying bug which manifests itself annoyingly as intermittent Wi-Fi issues.

Another one resolves a bug preventing your Mac from reconnecting to a Wi-Fi network after waking from sleep, causing you to manually disable and re-enable Wi-Fi, which gets old fast.

Next, iCloud Drive should be now accessible directly in Time Machine, including the ability to track changes to files and documents.

Moreover, 10.10.2 prevents the so-called ‘Thunderstrike’ hardware exploit which targets Macs equipped with high-bandwidth Thunderbolt ports and also includes other important fixes.