25 useful tips to get you started with Apple Watch

By Sébastien Page on Apr 24, 2015

Apple Watch is here! After months of anticipation, people around the world have started receiving their Apple Watch today. It’s now play time, or maybe more accurately, it’s learning time. Time to learn the ins and outs of this new device to get the most out of it.

In the next few days, iDB will be publishing guides on various aspects of Apple Watch, but in the meantime, we wanted to give you the heads up on some basic functions of Apple Watch, so that you know what to do with it right off the box.

In this post, we’ll share 25 tips to get you started with Apple Watch! Read More

 

Five Apple Watch tips for a more accurate heart rate reading

By Christian Zibreg on Apr 22, 2015

There’s no two ways about it: even under the most ideal of conditions, the Apple Watch may not be able to get a reliable heart rate reading every time for everybody. Now, our recent overview of the Apple Watch’s heart rate sensor provided a good starting point for enthusiasts wishing to learn more about the feature. It gives you a better idea of the intricacies and benefits of the custom-designed hardware feature marketed primarily to fitness aficionados.

But the truth is, it’s been designed for everyone, really. It’s something every Watch customer will be using without even being aware of it, simply by wearing the device (for those wondering, the average human heart rate is about seventy-two beats per minute).

On the back of the Watch is a specially designed sensor protected by a ceramic cover with sapphire lenses, with infrared and visible-light LEDs and photodiodes detecting the amount of blood flowing through your wrist at any given moment.

Knowing your heart rate helps the Watch determine your intensity level during workout while improving the accuracy of your active calorie burn measurements. Therefore, knowing the sensor’s limitations and pitfalls is important.

Luckily, there are some things you can do to help the Watch get the most consistent and best heart rate readings possible. Here are five sound tips regarding using this feature optimally and with minimal disruption. Read More

 

How to manage received AirDrop files with Hazel on Mac

By Jeff Benjamin on Apr 21, 2015

Every waking day I send tons of screenshots from my iPhone to my Mac via AirDrop. And every day I wish that Apple allowed users to customize the AirDrop save location. Not only is the ~/Downloads folder the default save location, but it can’t be modified, not even via undocumented methods.

As a workaround, I use Hazel ($29 w/ free trial) to automate the process of moving images sent via AirDrop to my Desktop. It’s a great workaround that does the job. While it would be nice if Apple allowed you to specify an exact save location, this is probably the next best thing. Read More

 

How to use the Pixelmator Repair Tool extension on Mac

By Jeff Benjamin on Apr 21, 2015

One of the most under-the-radar new features to hit OS X Yosemite was the addition of extensions. Action extensions are particularly nice, because they allow apps to interface with other apps directly.

Some app developers, such as Pixelmator ($29.99 on the Mac App Store), have brought third-party extensions to the Mac, which demonstrates how beneficial extensions can be. Watch our video that showcases Pixelmator’s Repair Tool extension to see what I mean. Read More

 

How to change the default name of screenshots on Mac

By Sébastien Page on Apr 16, 2015

When you take a screenshot on your Mac, OS X will by default name the file “Screen Shot Date Time” where “Date” and “Time” are the actual date and time when the screenshot was taken. This makes for long file names that aren’t necessarily helpful. If like me you want to have more control over that file name, then read on as I show you how to change the default name of screenshots on Mac. Read More

 

How to create a new library in the Photos app

By Jeff Benjamin on Apr 10, 2015

Creating separate libraries. It’s one of the best ways to go about organizing photos with the new Photos app in OS X Yosemite.  I find that using multiple libraries to separate things like work and personal life is a good strategy. Fortunately, it’s extremely simple to create new libraries and to switch between those libraries on the fly. Read More

 

How to migrate your iPhoto Library to the new Photos app

By Jeff Benjamin on Apr 9, 2015

Now that OS X Yosemite has been officially released, it’s time to think about migrating your old iPhoto library to the new Photos app. Migrating over is extremely easy, as there are multiple ways to do so. In this post, we highlight one of the easiest and most straightforward ways to migrate an iPhoto Library over to a new Photos app install. Read More

 

How to run Android apps like WhatsApp and Instagram on Mac

By Jeff Benjamin on Apr 5, 2015

ARC, or App Runtime for Chrome, is a tool that allows you to run many Android apps right on a desktop machine. For the most part, the apps look and function like they do on an Android phone or tablet.

Why is this so cool? Well, it means that you can now have access to whole variety of new apps. Some apps, like WhatsApp, have no native desktop counterpart, so it’s especially nice for apps like these.

While it isn’t a perfect 1:1 solution, and some apps outright don’t work, it’s worth trying if there’s an app that you want that isn’t otherwise available on the desktop. In this post and video, we’ll walk you through the steps of configuring Google’s ARC Welder tool, and show you how to run multiple applications as well.

Read More

 

How to configure apps to launch at system startup on Mac

By Jeff Benjamin on Mar 24, 2015

Do you have certain apps that you always open as soon as you restart or log in to your Mac? If so, it might be a good idea to make those apps auto-start upon logging in to OS X. Thankfully, it’s very easy to add and remove auto-start items using OS X’s System Preferences. Read More

 

How to get a 3D dock on OS X Yosemite

By Jeff Benjamin on Mar 22, 2015

Do you miss OS X’s 3D dock? OS X Yosemite finally did away with the 3D dock that’s been present since the release of OS X Leopard, but you can get it back by using a simple application called cDock.

cDock includes, among a host of other features, the ability to theme the dock with over a dozen built-in themes. There are night themes, fullscreen themes, pink themes, and, of course, 3D themes. If you’ve been reminiscing about the “good ol’ days”, then you can easily relive the past with this handy little application. Read More

 

How to use window snapping with HyperDock on Mac

By Jeff Benjamin on Mar 20, 2015

As many of you guys know, I’m a huge HyperDock ($9.99 on the Mac App Store) proponent. I use it primarily to have access to window previews of running apps in the OS X dock, but the tweak has additional features as well.

The biggest side benefit to using HyperDock is its window snapping capabilities. It’s not the deepest window snapping feature-set out there, but if you need basic Windows-like functionality, it’s should have more than enough to win you over. Read More

 

How to use aliases to create shortcuts on Mac

By Jeff Benjamin on Mar 17, 2015

On Windows, you create shortcuts. On Mac? There’s this little thing called aliases. Aliases are shortcuts that make it easier to find a file, folder, disk, or application. You can place aliases on your desktop, in the dock, or anywhere else that’s easy to find. In this tutorial, I’ll show you two easy ways to create aliases on your Mac. Read More

 

How to extract images from apps with the Preview app on Mac

By Jeff Benjamin on Mar 16, 2015

Applications on the Mac are really just directory structures containing files, images, assets, executables, and the like. If you’ve ever right-clicked on an application and selected Show Package Contents, then you know exactly what I mean.

While right-clicking is a reasonable solution for extracting image, font, and other visible assets from an application, the Preview app makes doing so even easier. By simply dragging and dropping an app on the Preview app icon in the dock, you’re presented with a easy navigable thumbnail view of all of the app’s various assets. Read More

 

How to tab between dialogue box buttons on Mac

By Jeff Benjamin on Mar 15, 2015

The tabbing experience on OS X might feel a little gimped if you’re coming from a Windows machine. That’s because, by default, OS X makes it so that the option to move keyboard focus between all controls with the Tab key is disabled.

Instead, tabbing is only possible between text boxes and lists using the default setting. In this tutorial, I’ll show you two quick and easy ways to change this setting and enable a much-improved tabbing experience on your Mac. Read More

 

How to show and hide filename extensions on Mac

By Jeff Benjamin on Mar 14, 2015

It’s easy to show and hide file extensions on the Mac. In fact, you can reveal file extensions for individual files, and show or hide file extensions globally.

By default, OS X ships with file extensions for popular filetypes hidden. So image files with the .png extension will omit the .png at the end of the filename, and apps will likewise discard the .app extension.

There are several ways to manage filename extensions in OS X. In this video, I’ll show you a couple of effective ways to get you started. Read More

 

How to take screenshots that include the mouse cursor on Mac

By Jeff Benjamin on Mar 13, 2015

As you might imagine, I take an absolute ton of screenshots on a regular basis. These screenshots aren’t just limited to iOS either, as I take many on the Mac as well.

Occasionally, I like to include the mouse cursor on my Mac screenshots. By default, the cursor is generally omitted with the popular screenshot keyboard shortcuts, but there is an easy way to make sure that the cursor is included when needed. Read More

 

How to show the ~/Library folder on Mac

By Jeff Benjamin on Mar 12, 2015

By default, the ~/Library folder is hidden on Mac. This is a folder that Apple feels you shouldn’t need access to most of the the time, but occasionally, you may need it for specific things. I use it often to view the preferences for the apps I have installed on my Mac. I also use it to access the Application Support folder, which as its name alludes to, features supporting files for apps.

If you use a Mac for a long enough time, you’ll eventually run into a situation where you’ll need to access the ~/Library folder. This video tutorial will show you several ways to do just that. Read More

 

Minimizing apps vs hiding apps on Mac

By Jeff Benjamin on Mar 11, 2015

In my daily workflow, I use the hide command and the minimize command to manage my applications and their corresponding windows. I definitely use the hide command much more than minimize, though, and there’s a simple reason behind my decision to do so. Have a look at our video walkthrough to see why. Read More

 

How to quickly hide all apps except for the active app on Mac

By Jeff Benjamin on Mar 10, 2015

I’m pretty messy when it comes to working on my Mac. I multitask a lot, and as such, I always have a gazillion windows open at any given time. But sometimes I need to focus, and when those times come, I like to get rid of every potential distraction and hone in on a specific app. OS X contains a very handy shortcut that allows you to do just that. Read More

 

How to quickly close all Finder windows with a keyboard shortcut on Mac

By Jeff Benjamin on Mar 9, 2015

Have you ever had a ton of Finder windows open and took the time to close each window one-by-one? I think some people get into the habit of doing this simply because Command (⌘)+Q doesn’t work with Finder. You can’t “quit” the Finder app, so that popular shortcut for closing apps won’t work.

That doesn’t necessarily mean you have to be relegated to the tedious effort required to manually close a bunch of Finder windows. Instead of individually closing out of each window that you have open, there’s a simple way to quickly close all open Finder windows. Read More

 
Page 112345...