Yosemite Guide

A look at some of the Safari enhancements in OS X Yosemite

Safari has been given a big revamp in OS X Yosemite, and it's one of my favorite new updates to the operating system as a whole. The team working on Safari took a lot of the elements that makes Safari on iOS a success, and incorporated those into the OS X Yosemite version. The result is a much-improved favorite interface, simplified toolbar, and better tab navigation. Safari for OS X Yosemite is a win all the way around. Have a look at our video walkthrough showcasing these new features inside...

How to manage group iMessages in OS X Yosemite

Like iOS 8, OS X Yosemite brings tons of new features to the table when it comes to iMessage. You can now do interesting things like rename iMessage Conversations, add additional participants to a group message conversation, and leave a group iMessage conversation outright.

Have a look at our video walkthrough after the break, which showcases these three new group iMessage features in OS X Yosemite.

Using Do Not Disturb in OS X Yosemite’s Messages app

Like the Messages app in iOS 8, the Yosemite version of Messages allows you to mute specific conversations by enabling Do Not Disturb. Do Not Disturb ensures that you still receive messages, but you won’t be bothered by notifications when new messages arrive.

Have a look at our video walkthrough explaining the ins and outs of Do Not Disturb after the break.

Translucency: a big part of OS X Yosemite’s new visual style

Translucency is everywhere in OS X Yosemite. In Safari, you can see the subtle colorful translucent glow of a website behind its toolbar. In the Finder, you’ll see apps and wallpaper glow behind your list of favorites, and in the Dock, you’ll see the translucent visuals of any apps that are moved behind it.

Check inside, as we explore OS X Yosemite's translucent effects in our video walkthrough. We'll also show you how to disable translucency if you're not a fan of the effect.

Improved Resize Controls: a new OS X Yosemite Feature

Apple has redesigned and redefined the window controls in OS X Yosemite, and like many of the other changes present in this release, it’s a welcomed change.

All of the window controls in OS X Yosemite—including the ability to invoke full screen mode—are now accessible from the red, yellow, and green “traffic light” buttons in the upper left-hand corner of every app. Check inside for the video details.

How to use Text Message Forwarding in OS X Yosemite

The ability to forward traditional SMS messages between the Mac and the iPhone is another huge feature to make its way to OS X Yosemite. Now that iOS 8.1 is publicly available, everyone can take advantage of this awesome new feature.

SMS Forwarding essentially makes it possible to turn the Messages app on your Mac into a full-fledged text messaging app. Not only can you compose SMS messages and stay in touch with your non-iMessage using friends, you can receive messages as well. Have a look at our video walkthrough for more details on this awesome new feature.

How to use Instant Hotspot on the Mac

Instant Hotspot is a great new feature that allows you to connect to your iPhone’s Hotspot for instant Internet access with zero configuration. As long as your Mac running OS X Yosemite and iPhone running iOS 8 are connected to the same iCloud account, and both devices have Bluetooth enabled, you can quickly tap into your iPhone’s Internet connection from your Mac.

How to make and take phone calls on your Mac

Now that iOS 8 and OS X Yosemite are out, the FaceTime app in OS X Yosemite is now capable of making and taking phone calls. It does so by connecting to an iPhone running iOS 8 to transmit calls via the iPhone’s cellular connection. All calls made from your Mac will appear as if they came from your iPhone’s phone number.

Want to see how it works in action? Check out our video after the break for a demonstration and setup details.

Helvetica Neue typeface replaces Lucida Grande as the system font in OS X Yosemite

One of the most striking changes that you will notice when you first fire up OS X Yosemite is the system-wide font change. Apple’s previous desktop operating system releases, since 1999, used Lucida Grande as the system font.

Lucida Grande worked well on lower resolution screens, but as high resolution Retina Displays become more common, it's starting to look out of place. To address the issue, Apple decided to adopt iOS’ system font of choice—Helvetica Neue—and make it the system font for OS X Yosemite.