SSD

How to move your Mac user folder to a separate drive from the boot drive

If you only have a small SSD in your Mac or Hackintosh, then storage space can be at a premium. For most users, by far the largest thing saved on their boot drive is the User folder, which contains their user account. If your user folder is filling up your SSD and you want to keep that high-speed storage for the operating system and applications, then this guide is for you.

It is possible to move your entire user account onto another drive, completely separate from your macOS boot drive. This will free up space on the boot drive and allow large media folders like Music, Movies, and Downloads to reside on a larger capacity drive.

Here’s a special tool Apple uses to recover data from MacBook Pro’s non-removable SSD

iFixit's teardown analysis of both the 13 and 15-inch MacBook Pro with Touch Bar has found a non-removable SSD inside soldered to the logic board. In contrast, non-Touch Bar Pros use a removable PCIe-based SSD, simplifying upgrades.

iFixit discovered that Touch Bar Pros include a hidden connector on the logic board that leads nowhere which, as reported by 9to5Mac, works in conjunction with a special tool to let service technicians rescue data in case of a hardware failure.

Teardown confirms both 13″ and 15″ Touch Bar MacBook Pros have non-removable SSDs

iFixit on Friday published its teardown analysis of the 15-inch MacBook Pro with Touch Bar (model number A1707), just two days after taking a peek under the hood of the 13-inch MacBook Pro with Touch Bar. Comparing the two Touch Bar-equipped notebooks to the 13-inch MacBook Pro without Touch Bar, which iFixit also disassembled, the repair site has confirmed that only the baseline 13-incher with a standard row of function keys has a removable SSD.

SSD in the new MacBook Pro with Touch Bar can’t be upgraded

After seeing in iFixit's teardown that the base model of the new 2016 MacBook Pro without the Touch Bar had a removable PCIe SSD storage unit, many were excited at the possibility of aftermarket upgrade parts across the new MacBook Pro lineup.

But new images surfacing on the web this week after the first MacBook Pro with Touch Bar units began reaching the hands of buyers are showing that the Touch Bar models don't follow suit and have SSD storage chips soldered into their logic boards instead.

Spotify to fix a bug in desktop app causing massive data writes that could reduce SSD lifespan

Spotify's desktop app for Mac, Windows and Linux has been found to be continuously writing massive amounts of data to local storage for no apparent reason—even when the app is simply sitting idle. As noted in Spotify's support forum, on Reddit and elsewhere, users are seeing the desktop app write tens of gigabytes of data to local storage every minute or so. On systems outfitted with SSDs like most Macs, excessive data writes can reduce the lifetime of flash storage.

That's because SSDs have a finite amount of write capacity and are prone to wear and tear. A Spotify spokesperson told ArsTechnica that a fix was underway via an update that's being rolled out as we speak.

Why and how to safely eject media drives from your Mac

Every time you connect an external peripheral to your Mac, such as an SD card, an external hard drive, or a USB flash drive to transfer files, you should safely eject it when you're finished using it.

In this post, we'll talk a little bit about why it's important to follow this process, and we'll also show you various ways of doing it.

OWC’s new driver adds Boot Camp support to all of its aftermarket SSD upgrades

In March, Other World Computing (OWC) launched the world's first SSD upgrade for 2013 and later MacBook Air and MacBook Pro with Retina display computers. The storage upgrades came in 480GB and 1TB flavors, and we recently showed you the install process of the 1TB OWC Aura SSD upgrade.

There was unfortunately a caveat that disallowed you to use Apple's Boot Camp feature with the drives, which meant you were limited to installing one operating system on it at a time, or using a virtual machine instead of partitioning the drive and dual-booting your Mac.

As of today, OWC has fixed this problem with a new universal driver that enables Boot Camp on all of OWC's SSD upgrades to date.

Upgrading your MacBook Air/Pro storage capacity with the OWC Aura Pro SSD

Other World Computing unveiled their Aura Pro PCI-e drop-in SSD upgrade kits last month for 2013 and later MacBook Pro with Retina display and MacBook Air model notebooks.

OWC's Aura Pro SSD storage upgrades start at $399.00 (introductory price) for a 480GB module and and go up in price from there.

Sure to be a popular seller for those that want to upgrade the on-board storage in their expensive Macs without buying an all-new Mac, we've decided to try it out and share with you exactly what we think about it.

New MacBooks offer 90 percent faster SSD write speeds, Skylake CPU up to 20 percent faster

Apple today announced a second-generation twelve-inch MacBook which brings speed increases across the board thanks to the use of Intel's latest Skylake chip platform, PCIe-based flash storage and a speedier 1,866MHz RAM.

The Verge took the new machines briefly for a spin. Having put the new MacBook through its paces in Primate Labs' $0.99 Geekbench 3 benchmarking app to measure the performance of the new Intel CPU and using the free Blackmagic Disk Speed Test app for benchmarking disk I/O operations, the publication was able to determine just how performant the updated flash storage and Intel's new Skylake CPU are.

How to see how much storage space is available on your Mac

Since your Mac's storage can be quite limited and expensive to upgrade, it's important for you to be able to check and see just how much available storage space your Mac's solid state drive or hard drive has left before it fills up.

There is more than one way to check, and in this tutorial, we'll show you how to check the amount of available storage space that you have left on your Mac, whether it's a desktop or notebook computer.

Understanding how iOS and macOS calculate storage capacity

One of the questions I hear a lot about storage space on Macs and iOS devices is why when you purchase a 256GB Mac you only get about 230GB of space to play with, or why when you get a 16GB iPhone, you only get about 12.6GB to use for yourself.

The fact of the matter is, your storage space is used by more than just what you put on your own computer or device, and in this piece, we'll explain how Apple calculates all that storage space that you can never seem to claim on your devices.