iCloud login alerts (image 001)

As noted by Letem světem Applem and confirmed by MacRumors editor Eric Slivka, Apple in the aftermath of the nude celeb pics scandal seems to have taken the first in a series of promised steps to bolster up the security of its cloud.

Now each time you sign in to iCloud through a web browser, the Cupertino firm will issue an email notice which contains a date and time that the account was accessed. This behavior is now enabled by default.

Previously, login alerts had been sent only if there was an attempt to log in to iCloud on an unknown Apple device.

Slivka was able to verify that Apple is sending out these alerts even if the specific browser/device has been used previously to access iCloud, in order to ensure that any attempt to compromise your password can be dealt with swiftly — simply follow a link to quickly reset the Apple ID password provided in the message body.

These email notifications are said to be pushed only the first time an account logs in to a particular device/browser.

CEO Tim Cook promised new security measures, including broadening Apple’s two-step verification for iCloud accounts and sending out push alerts on attempted password changes or resets, when someone tries to restore iCloud backup to a new device, or a device logs into an account for the first time.

Until now, users merely received an email when someone tried to change a password or log in from an unknown Apple device. To learn how to enable Apple’s two-step authentication on your account, follow our tutorial.

YouGove (post-iCloud breach security)

According to a YouGov survey (see above) of more than a thousand Americans commissioned by security company Tresorit, approximately one-third of U.S. users have improved their online security in response to the iCloud hacking.

Apple is wise to make these changes given that the celeb hacking couldn’t have come at a worst time as the firm preps to unveil its rumored iPhone mobile payment service tomorrow.

[Letem světem Applem via MacRumors]