Steve Jobs

Steve Jobs originally thought Genius Bar would never work

When Apple’s former retail chief Ron Johnson presented the idea for tech support stations—dubbed Genius Bar—that would be located inside the company’s brick-and-mortar stores, Steve Jobs loathed the concept and thought it would never work.

“I remember the day I came in and told Steve about the Genius Bar idea and he says, ‘That’s so idiotic! It’ll never work!’”, Johnson told Recode.

Remembering Steve Jobs, who would have turned 62 today

Steve Jobs, Apple’s late co-founder and chief executive, would have turned 62 today. Perhaps best known to the general public for his penchant for carefully choreographed product presentations and unique leadership style, Steve passed away on October 5, 2011—the day after the iPhone 4s unveiling—of respiratory arrest related to a rare form of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor he was diagnosed with in 2003.

Apple celebrates 10-year anniversary of first iPhone unveiling

Apple on Sunday posted a press release entitled “iPhone at ten: the revolution continues.” The announcement recognizes that it’s been 10 years since Steve Jobs unveiled the original iPhone, and reflects on how far the handset has come.

By now, everyone knows the story. On January 9, 2007, Steve Jobs took the Macworld stage and told the audience: “every once in a while, a revolutionary product comes along that changes everything.” And the rest, as they say, is history.

Read Tim Cook’s email to Apple employees about fifth anniversary of Steve Jobs’s death

Yesterday marked fifth anniversary of Steve Jobs’s passing. The legendary Apple co-founder died on October 5, 2011 of respiratory arrest related to the pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor he was diagnosed with back in 2003. As we reported, Apple’s boss Tim Cook paid tribute to Jobs by sharing one of his famous quotes on Twitter.

He also emailed a touching message to Apple employees, this part stuck with me: “Steve also taught me that life’s great joy is in the journey, not in any particular occasion or event. It’s not about shipping or selling or winning an award. The real joy is in getting there.”

In this game, Steve Jobs was North Korean and started APeX Computers out of a garage

Homefront: The Revolution, an upcoming shooter developed by Deep Silver Dambuster Studios and Deep Silver, a division of Austria’s Koch Media, is based on an interesting alternative history scenario in which Steve Jobs was North Korean and started APeX Computers out of a garage in the 1970s.

Set in the year 2029 when the United States is occupied by North Korea, the game is full of alternative history stories relating to Apple and comes with a complete timeline of events that detail the creation of the APeX II personal computer, an iPhone-style device called aPhone and other events from 1953 onwards.

Little-known Mac feature lets you watch window minimizing animations in slow motion

Mac OS X comes with a little-known function that lets you slow down the Dock’s window minimization animation just for the fun of it.

Since Apple spends a lot of time creating quality animations with sleek and buttery-smooth transitions, it’s only fair that they should give users a way to enjoy them in slow motion.

In this tutorial, we’ll show you how you can view your Dock’s window minimization animation in slow motion.

How a journalist convinced Jobs to bring iTunes to PCs and other tidbits from Tony Fadell interview

It was The Wall Street Journal technology columnist Walt Mossberg, one of Steve Jobs’s favorite reviewers, of all people who has finally managed to persuade then Apple CEO to expand the addressable market for iPods by bringing iTunes to Windows PCs.

Jobs, Nest founder Tony Fadell and then Apple executive charged with iPod and iPhone development recalls, long insisted that the iPod be used as a vehicle to increase Mac sales. “Steve, the iPod is $399. But really it’s not. Because you have to buy a Mac!” We had to give people a taste,” Fadell recalls telling Jobs, to no avail.

He eventually relented and agreed that Apple should bring iTunes to Windows, under one condition: the software was to be tested by journalist Walt Mossberg. “We’re going to build these and run it by Mossberg,” Jobs reportedly said. “And if Mossberg says it’s good enough to ship, then we’ll ship it.”

Walt reportedly said, “Not bad. I’d ship it,” and the rest is history.

Pre-order Danny Boyle’s ‘Steve Jobs’ ahead of tomorrow’s release on iTunes

If the mixed reviews of Danny Boyle’s ‘Steve Jobs’ movie have discouraged you from seeing it in a local theater near you, you’ll soon be able to check out what all the kerfuffle was about as the flick is now available for pre-order in the iTunes Store.

Directed by Danny Boyle and released worldwide by Universal Pictures,’Steve Jobs’ features Michael Fassbender as the iconic co-founder of Apple, Kate Winslet as his girlfriend, Seth Rogen as the other Steve, Steve Wozniak, and other talents such as Jeff Daniels, Michael Stuhlbarg, Katherine Waterston, John Ortiz and Perla Haney-Jardine.

Steve Jobs considered Apple car eight years ago

According to the famous iPod creator, former Apple engineer and Nest founder Tony Fadell, Steve Jobs did consider an idea of Apple building a car as far back as 2008, but ultimately decided not to move forward because he had other projects on his mind.

In a video interview with Bloomberg, Fadell said that Jobs and himself discussed how a hypothetical Apple car would we build, what features it would have, what a dashboard would be like and so forth.

Watch ‘Steve Jobs’ scene with Woz confronting Steve over impending launch of NeXT Computer

The high-profile ‘Steve Jobs’ biopic, based on Walter Isaacson authorized biography of Apple’s mercurial co-founder, released today in select theaters across the United States and Universal posted a full scene on its YouTube channel to celebrate the launch.

In it, Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak (played by Seth Rogen) warns Steve (played by Michael Fassbender) that the launch of NeXT, Jobs’s overpriced, cube-shaped workstation computer created during his wilderness years, will go down in history “as the single biggest failure in the history of personal computing.”