MacBook

Apple apparently working on additional MacBook Pro models without Touch Bar

Thom Holwerda, managing editor of OSnews, heard from “people and sources who know their stuff” that Apple’s been working on additional MacBook Pro models without TouchBar. Sources claim the decision to develop new MacBook Pros sans Touch Bar was made because Apple was taken aback by harsh criticism that professional users leveled at the latest MacBook Pro models.

Now that Apple has stopped discounting USB-C accessories, check out these cheaper alternatives

It was fun while it lasted: the age of Apple’s discounted USB-C adapters and dongles is over as of today. But don’t you worry as we just updated our roundups of cheaper USB-C adapters and USB-C cables from third-party vendors that you may need for your new MacBook Pro.

Following complaints from customers regarding the need for various dongles, Apple temporarily discounted many USB-C peripherals sold in its stores as a way to assuage their concerns. The limited-time deals were supposed to end on December 31, 2016 but the company extended the price cuts until March 31, 2017.

Apple: iPhone and Mac vulnerabilities detailed in WikiLeaks CIA dump were fixed years ago

WikiLeaks yesterday published a new batch of internal CIA documents which highlighted some of the hacks and programs that the spy organization has been developing internally for years. Those tools were specifically designed to infest Apple’s all-in-one iMac desktop and MacBook notebooks if an agent was able to gain physical access to the device.

One of the methods involved utilized patched Thunderbolt EFI exploit. Apple told TechCrunch that the documents detail old exploits fixed years ago.

Apple patent envisions a MacBook powered by your iPhone or iPad

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) on Thursday published Apple’s patent application for an “Electronic accessory device” acting as a dock that would turn your iPhone or iPad into a touchscreen-enabled Mac notebook, something many people have been craving for. The patent application outlines an ultra-portable MacBook of sorts with a special dock into which an iOS device could be inserted to provide compute power, software, storage and other features.

As with many other Apple patents, there’s no telling when this particular invention might see the light of day, if ever.

WikiLeaks details CIA’s infestation software targeting iMac and MacBook computers

Following the initial release of documents, dubbed “Year Zero,” which detailed tactics the CIA leverages to breach iPhones, iPads, Windows, smart TVs and other devices, WikiLeaks today published additional “Vault 7”-series materials. Code-named “Dark Matter,” the latest batch of secret files provides an insight into other CIA hacks and programs that have been internally developed and maintained for years with the goal of infesting Apple’s all-in-one iMac desktop and MacBook notebooks.

How to disable Touch Bar on MacBook Pro

Apple’s 13 and 15-inch 2016 MacBook Pros come outfitted with Touch Bar, which is an OLED display strip in place of the physical function keys at the top of your keyboard. Touch Bar updates its graphics dynamically based on what you’re doing and apps that you’re using, giving you one-tap access to common features and shortcuts on your Mac.

In this tutorial, we’ll be discussing turning off app shortcuts displayed in your Touch Bar altogether so that its layout mimics that of your Mac’s keyboard. This will let you tap a button to access standard macOS features like brightness, volume and media controls, Mission Control, Launchpad, Siri or—yes—even those Fn keys.

Apple wants to zero in on ‘Pro’ segment, but what about the large majority?

In a statement warmly welcomed by us internet folk, Tim Cook recently proclaimed “you will see us do more in the pro area.” In our circles, this is unquestionably good news, as we all foster an insatiable appetite for new innovations, be that on a hardware or software level. More pro is great, however I invariably had to spare a thought for the average, not-so techy Apple customer.

I’m talking about the type of customer that after owning their iPhone 6S for more than a year, still has little concept of what 3D Touch does. Or how about the one that loves their new MacBook, but will gaze at you with a stunned expression when you introduce them to Force Touch on their trackpad. This is by no means meant to sound snarky or patronizing, because as a matter of fact, I don’t blame them for not knowing – I blame Apple for failing to take everyone along for the ride due to poor communication.

Shifting up the ‘Pro’ a notch in the future sounds great, that said how do you straddle the line between pleasing us tech-warriors and not entirely overwhelming a large majority of users, a majority already only privity to roughly half of the juicy features on their devices? Apple needs to find some cogent answers to this issue, and rather than creating a two-tier system in their hardware sold (labelling only some products ‘Pro’), I contend that software could be the key.