How to quickly toggle dark mode using a keyboard shortcut on Mac

By Jeff Benjamin on Feb 27, 2015

Dark mode is one of the more popular features of OS X Yosemite, because it allows you to add a dark tint to both the dock and the menu bar on Mac. The standard way to enable dark mode involves venturing to System Preferences, opening the General section, and clicking on the enable dark mode option. But wouldn’t it be cool if you could toggle dark mode using a simple keyboard shortcut?

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How to make third-party menu bar icons look better with dark mode on Mac

By Jeff Benjamin on Feb 26, 2015

OS X Yosemite introduced a new dark mode option to change the tint color of both the menu bar and the dock in OS X. While I’m a big fan of dark mode, some of the third-party apps that I use have not been updated to play nice with dark mode. This results in menu bar icons that look weird with dark mode enabled, because they don’t invert after toggling dark mode on.

If you’re someone who always uses dark mode and never switches to regular mode, there is a way to force these menu bar icons to look better with dark mode enabled… Read More

 

How to make Safari for Mac’s status bar more minimal and useful

By Christian Zibreg on Feb 25, 2015

I like my browsers minimal. Safari for Mac admittedly boasts an aesthetically pleasing, clutter-free interface. But if there’s one thing I’ve always hated about Apple’s browsers, it’s that status bar at the bottom of the Safari window.

Though it conveniently lets you know where a URL will take you, once turned on it annoyingly just sits there whether you actually need it or not. I prefer Google’s approach better: Chrome’s status bar discreetly shows only when hovering over a URL.

Wouldn’t it be great if Safari had a similar only-on-hover status bar? That’s what Minimal Status Bar, a new browser extension by San Francisco-based developer Visnu Pitiyanuvath, does for you. Read More

 

How to jailbreak iOS 8.2 beta 2 with TaiG for Windows

By Jeff Benjamin on Feb 24, 2015

A few days ago, we posted our Mac jailbreak tutorial for iOS 8.2 beta 1 and 2. That tutorial used the PP Jailbreak tool for the Mac. For Windows users, things are slightly different. Windows users get to use the TaiG tool. At the end of the day, both tools are geared towards the same goal—allowing you to easily jailbreak iOS 8.2 beta 1 and 2. Read More

 

Workflow is an amazing app, and this WordPress image uploading workflow shows why

By Jeff Benjamin on Feb 24, 2015

Although I’ve long admired the iPad-centric work ethic of individuals like MacStories’ Federico Viticci, I could never fully commit to working from my iPad due to the perceived amount of steps needed to get things done. Yes, it’s possible, but I’ve always thought it was easier to work from my MacBook Pro.

With that said, I certainly admire anyone who can successfully pull it off, as Viticci has obviously done. There’s even a slight bit of jealousy there because he’s figured out well in advance how not to be ball-and-chained to a traditional desktop.

With iOS 8, a lot of that has changed. iOS is now more open than ever and users can do some powerful things with said openness. Case and point: Workflow—the automation app that opens up the door to automation newbs like myself. Yes, much automation could be done prior to Workflow—apps like Pythonista and Editorial proved as much—but Workflow is venturing into brand new territory. Not only is it arguably the most powerful automation tool available for iOS, it makes implementing automation accessible to mere mortals.

In this post, I’d like to show off one of the workflows that I’m extremely proud of. To be honest, this post is sort of a stealth-brag, but that’s okay. When you see this workflow in action, you’ll understand why. Read More

 

How to restart the menu bar on Mac

By Jeff Benjamin on Feb 24, 2015

On rare occasions, I encounter a frozen menu bar on my Mac. Perhaps you too have encountered a scenario where the beach ball appears when hovering over the menu bar. A lot of time, this can be resolved by killing the single app that’s causing problems. In other situations, you may need to completely kill and restart the menu bar to do the job. Read More

 

How to create a new folder containing selected items on Mac

By Jeff Benjamin on Feb 22, 2015

OS X allows users to create new folders with pre-selected items, and to be honest, it’s one of my favorite features of the Finder. All you need to do is highlight the items you want to place in a folder, right click, and execute the command. It makes cleaning up files extremely quick and easy, and I find myself using it on a daily basis. Read More

 

Empty Trash versus Secure Empty Trash – what’s the difference?

By Jeff Benjamin on Feb 21, 2015

Did you know that there are actually two ways to empty the trash on your Mac? Perhaps you’ve seen both options before, but never gave it much thought. Just what is the deal with Empty Trash versus Secure Empty Trash? Which one should you use? By knowing what each empty trash command is capable of doing, you’ll be able to make more informed future decisions with regard to handling your Mac’s sanitation needs. Read More

 

Podcasting basics part IV: recording, exporting and uploading

By Jeff Benjamin on Feb 21, 2015

This is the second to last entry into my podcasting basics series. In part I, I talked about some of the preliminary steps needed before starting a podcast. In part II, I discussed the hardware that we use to record shows like Let’s Talk iOS and Let’s Talk Jailbreak. In part III, I broke down the software used. Now that you have a good idea of what hardware and software that we use, along with the basic overall methodology, let’s talk about starting the actual recording.

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How to set the default Finder folder on the Mac

By Jeff Benjamin on Feb 20, 2015

I don’t know about you, but I find OS X’s All My Files folder to be excruciatingly annoying and I cringe any time I accidentally visit this folder. I dislike it so much that I’ve completely removed it from my side bar on the Finder.

By default, Apple actually makes users visit the All My Files folder whenever a new Finder window is opened. Needless to say, this is one of the first things that I alter upon installing OS X. Read More

 

How to split and merge Finder windows on the Mac

By Jeff Benjamin on Feb 19, 2015

There is a seemingly endless amount of tips and tricks that can be pulled off with OS X’s Finder, but it’s a good idea to get a good handle on some of its more basic functionality before delving into the deep end of the pool. One of the first things that you should learn is how to tackle tabs and windows.

OS X Mavericks ushered in a new tabbed interface for the Finder, a feature that was at the top of almost every Mac owner’s list before it finally arrived. Tabs allow you to view multiple Finder windows within a single interface, and they work very much like the tabs in your favorite web browser.

Did you know that you can easily break apart tabs into their own window? Or what about merging all tabs back into a single window interface? I’ll show you how to do both in the video tutorial that follows. Read More

 

How to get 100GB of free OneDrive storage

By Christian Zibreg on Feb 19, 2015

Microsoft’s cloud storage thing called OneDrive has been on fire lately. The service has been generous with free space in the past few months. For starters, each account gets fifteen gigabytes of free storage and Office 365 subscribers get to enjoy unlimited storage as long as they continue paying their subscription. For some time now the Windows maker’s been offering free OneDrive storage to US residents who’ve signed up for Bing Rewards program.

Starting today, this offer is now available globally so everyone can now get 100GB of free OnDrive storage for two years. Here’s how you can claim your free storage. Read More

 

How to disable the iSight camera on your Mac

By Jeff Benjamin on Feb 19, 2015

Every Mac that Apple ships, sans the Mac mini, comes with an iSight camera embedded in the bezel at the top of the display. If my memory serves me correctly, Apple’s computers were one of the first to really popularize the standardization of built-in cameras.

I’m probably not alone when I say that I rarely, if ever, use my MacBook Pro’s iSight camera. In fact, it’s become more of a worry to me when thinking about the potential hacking and privacy concerns. I’m far from a tin foil hat wearer, but I have to be honest and admit that the thought has crossed my mind before…you know, the one where hackers view my iSight camera unbeknown to me.

With all of that said, wouldn’t it be nice if you could disable your Mac’s iSight camera with a simple software tweak? Inside, I’ll show you how to do just that. Read More

 

How to rotate photos on iPhone or iPad

By Sébastien Page on Feb 17, 2015

We’ve all been there: you want to take a photo in landscape mode, but before your iPhone accelerometer has registered it should rotate from portrait to landscape, you’ve already taken the shot. The result is a nice photo, but one that looks funny on your screen. Try to rotate the screen, and the photo rotates with it. It’s annoying, but of course, as you may already know, there is an easy way to rotate that photo so it looks good on your screen. Read More

 

Podcasting basics part III: software

By Jeff Benjamin on Feb 14, 2015

This is the third entry into my podcasting basics series. In part I, I discussed some of the preliminary steps needed before starting a podcast. In part II, I talked about the hardware that I personally use to record shows like Let’s Talk iOS and Let’s Talk Jailbreak.

After going through the preliminary conceptualizing and picking out the hardware that works for your particular scenario, it’s time to mate the hardware with the right software. Software choices for producing podcasts can vary significantly, but I’ve come up with a formula that works for me.

Of course, your decision to use a piece of software may boil down to your particular needs. For example, if you’re not a Mac user, then many, if not all of your software will differ. That being said, the basic recording techniques that I employ will more or less be the same, and can be used regardless of the software you decide on using. In this post, I break down the software that I use for recording and producing our podcasts. Read More

 

How to auto hide the dock and remove its delay on the Mac

By Jeff Benjamin on Feb 14, 2015

The idea of auto hiding the dock has always seemed appealing, because it give back the real estate normally lost by an always-present dock. The downside to auto hide, however, is the slight delay that occurs whenever the dock shows and hides. For me, the delay totally kills the idea of using auto hide. But what if you could remove the delay?

In this tutorial, I will show you how to have the best of both worlds: a dock that is hidden, yet at the same time immediately accessible due to the omission of the annoying delay. Read More

 

How to add space separators to the dock on your Mac

By Jeff Benjamin on Feb 13, 2015

Looking to better organize the dock in OS X? Perhaps adding a few spacers would do the trick. Adding spacers to your Mac’s dock is super simple and easy with just a couple of Terminal commands. It’s a great way to organize your dock’s applications and provides it with a custom look and feel. Read More

 

How to straighten iPhone photos

By Sébastien Page on Feb 13, 2015

If you look at my Instagram account, you’ll clearly see a similarity to a majority of my shots: they usually feature some straight lines, generally the line of the horizon. I’m kind of obsessed with straight lines, because, well, I guess I’m just OCD like that. The problem is all photos aren’t shot perfectly straight, and more often than not, you’ll have to manually straighten them to get them leveled to your liking.

Straightening a photo isn’t a pro tip by any means, but the feature isn’t necessarily very obvious either, hence this quick tip on how to straighten a photo on iPhone. Read More

 

Photos app and the power of search

By Sébastien Page on Feb 12, 2015

You’d think that searching through your photos should be an impossible task. Unlike a text document, there are no actual words you can look for in a photo. But your photos can hold very precious information that can help surface some details about your shots. If you have Location Services enabled for your iPhone camera app, then all your shots contain location metadata, allowing you to perform very specific searches in the stock Photos app of iOS.

And with the release of iOS 8, Apple has included some very powerful features to help you find that one photo you were looking for. Read More

 

How to transfer photos from iPhone or iPad to Mac

By Lory Gil on Feb 12, 2015

In my line of work, I constantly need pictures on my desktop or laptop that I’ve taken on my iPhone. I personally use iCloud on iPhoto because the images immediately appear on my synced computers. However, there are a number of different ways to transfer pictures to your desktop or laptop, which also makes it much easier to delete them off of your iPhone, freeing up space.

We’ve got a basic how-to guide for transferring photos from your iPhone or iPad Photos app to your Mac using a few different options. Read More

 
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