Taptic Engine

How to use audio enhancements on your Apple Watch

Taptic Time Settings on Apple Watch

If you or a loved one have trouble hearing, whether permanently or for a short time, take advantage of the Accessibility and touch features on Apple Watch.

With taps on your wrist, adjustments for earphones, and alternatives to dictation, your Watch can be just as wonderful with touch as it is with sound.

Rose offers seemingly unlimited ways to customize iPhone haptic feedback

If anything’s certain, it’s that the time and energy Apple invested in creating the iPhone’s Taptic Engine means haptic feedback is here to stay, and it’ll probably become more advanced over time as Apple further develops and refines its hardware and software.

But one place where Apple falls short on its platform is haptic feedback customization, and that’s where a free and comprehensive jailbreak tweak dubbed Rose by iOS developer Litten comes into play.

How to disable haptic feedback when scrolling with the Digital Crown on your Apple Watch

Apple says that Digital Crown haptic feedback built into Apple Watch Series 4 was designed to deliver a precise click-like feel as you scroll, and it really does, but some people find it annoying. If you count yourself in that group, then do follow along with our step-by-step tutorial as we show you how to disable Digital Crown haptic feedback on your Series 4 wearable.

How to use Taptic Time on Apple Watch

The Taptic Engine, Apple's vibratory motor inside every Apple Watch, gives you new ways to mark time in watchOS 6 by optionally tapping out the time on your wrist  — they're calling this Taptic Time. You can even set a chime to ring in the new hour or have Siri tell you the time out loud. Follow along with iDB as we show you how to use Taptic Time on your Apple Watch.

Hapticker offers haptic feedback for most of what you do in iOS

Admittedly, I’m the type of person who enjoys an ounce of haptic feedback when operating my iPhone, and for that reason, I’m always testing out the latest haptic feedback-related jailbreak tweaks as they surface.

One of the newest add-ons in this department is one called Hapticker by iOS developer Soh Satoh, and from what we can gather, it provides haptic feedback for just about anything in iOS that you would ever want it for.

HapticVolume brings haptic feedback to your volume buttons

Those who know me best also know that I have a soft spot for jailbreak tweaks that give my iPhone simple haptic feedback capabilities. For that same reason, I’m excited to share the news about a free release called HapticVolume by iOS developer MayBeMe.

In a nutshell, HapticVolume compels your iPhone to exhibit a tidbit of haptic feedback whenever you depress either of the volume adjustment buttons on the side of your device.

TapticSpotify brings haptic feedback to the Spotify app’s music controls

I’ve always had a soft spot for jailbreak tweaks that bring subtle haptic feedback to various parts of my iPhone. That said, anyone who might be in the same boat should consider a new free release called TapticSpotify by iOS developer Chloee.

As you might have already inferred from the tweak’s name, TapticSpotify brings Taptic Engine-driven haptic feedback to the music controls found in the Now Playing section of the official Spotify app.

Melior is the volume HUD Apple should add to future iterations of iOS

Repeating the sad story about how iOS’ volume HUD leaves a lot to be desired feels a lot like beating a dead horse. You’d think Apple would have done something about this concern by now, but as always, it’s the jailbreak community that offers the fastest refuge.

Melior is a volume HUD-centric jailbreak tweak coded by iOS developer SparkDev and designed by Dennis Bednarz that produces one of the cleanest alternatives to iOS’ terrible volume HUD that we’ve seen.