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Our problem with Apple

Chuq Von Rospach has a great piece about how Apple could have avoided much of the controversy following last week’s Mac event. It’s a great read, but the one line I will remember is that one:
We demand Apple innovate, but we insist they don’t change anything.
This truly resonated with me because it’s a feeling I’ve had for a long time but never was able to express in a clear and simple manner. Chuq did in in just eleven words.

Read the whole piece when you have a few minutes.

Scott Forstall and Apple: no hard feelings, really

In an interview with the Wall Street Journal about his new role as a Broadway producer, Scott Forstall had few but nice things to say about Apple:
Asked about the split, Mr. Forstall said he was “so proud of the thousands of people I worked with [at Apple] and with whom I remain friends. I am delighted that they continue to turn out great and beloved products.”
The whole interview is an interesting read, along as you care about either Scott Forstall or musicals in general.

Reclaiming moments with Apple Watch

In his secret history of the Apple Watch story, David Pierce concludes that the device might be able to help us reclaim small moments of our lives, something I’ve tried to explain several times in my posts about the best Apple Watch features Apple hasn’t told you about, and a day in the life of an Apple Watch user.

Mark Zuckerberg explains why you had to download Messenger as a separate app

Facebook took a lot of heat back in July when it disabled messaging from the main Facebook app, forcing users to download the standalone Messenger app if they wanted to keep using the social network to send direct messages to friends and family. To most people, the move went vastly misunderstood, and it didn’t help that the company stayed mum about it. At least until now, because in a Q&A session earlier today transcribed by The Verge, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg finally addressed the issue. The reason? It’s all about removing friction.

The iPhone’s financial impact

An excellent read by Jeff Sommer for the New York Times about the financial impact of the iPhone on the global economy.
“The iPhone is having a measurable impact,” said Michael Feroli, the chief United States economist for JPMorgan Chase. “It’s a little gadget, but it costs a lot and it seems that everybody has one. When you do the multiplication, it’s going to matter.” He estimates that iPhone sales are adding one-quarter to one-third of a percentage point to the annualized growth rate of the gross domestic product.
If you want to learn more about the economic ramifications of the iPhone, I recommend you read the whole piece.

iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus launch drives record accessory sales

Records keep piling for the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, which according to research firm NPD, were responsible for driving accessory sales in the US to new highs, reaching a quarter of a billion dollars in the two weeks that followed the launch of the devices:
U.S. mobile phone accessory sales reached record levels following the launch of the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus. Accessory sales for the two weeks after the launch were 43 percent higher than the two weeks prior, reaching $249 million, according to The NPD Group Weekly Tracking Service.
For more details, read the full press release here.