Chromecast

YouTube app adds Chromecast playback controls to Lock screen, Control Center & Apple Watch

Google’s official YouTube for iPhone and iPad app has picked up a trio of compelling new features in its most recent update on App Store. Bumped to version 12.03, the free of charge software adds handy Chromecast controls to Control Center and your iOS device’s Lock screen, and to your wrist via Apple Watch. The playback controls only appear when you’re streaming videos from Chromecast devices, smart TVs, game consoles or any other living room devices that run the YouTube app.

Google’s Home gadget is based on Chromecast hardware, doesn’t run Android

Home, the search giant’s always-listening Amazon Echo rival that was announced at Google I/O 2016, is basically a “dressed up” version of the company’s $35 Chromecast HDMI dongle, claims a paywall’d article published by The Information.

It’s a bit odd that Google’s upcoming device doesn’t run Android—it’s powered by the same Linux-based OS used on the Chromecast—though Google has reportedly discussed using Android for the next version of Home.

HBO NOW updated with support for Google’s Chromecast

HBO pushed out an update for its NOW mobile app this morning, brining the iOS client to version 1.2. According to the change log, the release includes performance improvements, and support for push notifications and Chromecast devices.

That latter item is by far the most significant, given that HBO’s streaming service has been exclusive to Apple TV since it launched in April. Now, those with Google’s $30 HDMI dongle can enjoy HBO NOW content on their big screen TVs.

Google Cast can now stream music to wireless speakers, sound bars and receivers

Google on Monday made another effort to take on AirPlay, a wireless media streaming technology from Apple, with the introduction of Google Cast for audio, The Verge is reporting.

Basically an update to the Google Cast SDK, it lets you stream your music from mobile devices to Cast-ready speakers, sound bars and receivers, some of which are already on the way. Cast technology is already used in Chromecast, a $35 HDMI dongle available in 27 countries.

An accompanying Cast SDK allows programmers to create multi-screen experiences which let users send and control content like video from a smartphone, tablet or laptop to a display device such as a large screen television set.