ios 8 adoption rate feb 16 2015

According to Apple’s own data, adoption rate for iOS 8 is now at 73%, a small one percentage point up from when it was measured last, two weeks ago. iOS 7 is of course behind at 24%, and 3% of devices are running a software version that two or more years old.

Analytics firm MixPanel shows similar data, reporting that iOS 8 is installed on 75.74% of compatible devices.

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For comparison, iOS 7 was installed on 80% of devices at the same time last year. These numbers show once again that iOS 8 adoption rate is trailing behind that of previous software versions. This are still remarkable adoption rates though, especially when put side by side with Android.

  • leart

    Proud owner of three devices from the 3%

    • Jonathan

      Got 2 devices in that 3% too.

      • Cameron

        I wonder if they count unused or un-updatable iPhones in that list… I too have a couple on older iOS.

      • Jonathan

        My best guess would be anything active within a certain number of weeks/months.

    • Nathan

      I miss iOS 6..I’d do anything for an iPhone 5 on iOS 6..

      • leart

        Iphone 5 on ios 6 it was stunning fast, and with 1gb of ram it was never out of memory

  • George

    That’s so stupid to compare, its not googles fault its Samsung, lg, HTC ect.

    • Cameron

      misread, ignore.

      • George

        Um no, if apples software was used on any other devices besides the iPhone then you would see the same results.

      • Cameron

        Yes I already said I misread your comment. Ignore that.

      • I doubt it. The main delay with Android updates are unsupported devices due to hardware reasons or because the manufacturer won’t update them and delays with carriers. Apple would suffer with supporting devices that have incapable hardware however other than that they’d likely support all of the devices and it’d be down to the user to upgrade. They almost certainly wouldn’t have to worry about carriers since they don’t allow carriers to do anything with their software…

      • George

        Unsupported devices? The flagship android phones from last year that are not motorola or nexus still don’t have lollipop because the manufacturers are still putting their crapware on there.

      • I don’t think it takes OEMs that long to update. There’s obviously going to be a slight delay where they’re testing their software to make sure it works but the biggest delay is with carriers. Many Android phones have a Google Play edition which I think means they’re unlocked and bought off contract and 99.99% of the time these phones always have the latest updates before contract phones locked to a particular network. The sooner OEMs start telling carriers to “f**k off” the better…

  • n0ahcruz3

    If apple stopped bull$hitting us with an 8gb device or 16gb then expect the adoption rate to increase.

  • Benedict

    You can’t compare thousands of different devices with five or six running iOS. Also Android has hundrets of different specific versions made and customized for each device.
    More important is the fact that every device from 2.3.3 gets constant updates over the Google Play Services automatically. This way, not only normal apps but core components of the OS stay up to date though the running system is e.g. 5 years old. That means, a version of Android 2.3.3 is not the same today like it was in 2010. New functions and APIs were added (e.g. Device Manager to locate or remotely wipe device). This is a big difference to iOS where e.g. iOS 4 stays the same. It won’t adapt itself with new features. See examples below…

    • Maxim∑

      Google has had plenty of time to enforce stricter regulations on OEMs but as long as they get you on there $ervices google could careless what version of android your on. While you say there are 1,000s of android variations the hardware is extremely similar in each one

      • Benedict

        True, the situation is not satisfying. Just saying it is hard to compare to iOS. The Google Services are a step in the right direction. Considering the price and the updated core features of an older device, it is acceptable not to get a “real” update from the OEM. The device “works” good though… (I have a colleague at work who has a HTC Desire Z (2010) with QWERTZ keyboard. I took a look lately at it and it runs surprisingly well)

  • Dan

    You simply can’t compare the two, and I don’t see the point of posting this. Does it make you feel better in some way?