Apple doesn’t go out of its way to release streaming numbers for Apple TV+. But, sometimes, we get a glimpse behind the curtain. Especially when things appear to be going well.

For example, the latest report from Deadline that tells us Apple TV+ did pretty well for itself when it launched its newest documentary. According to the publication, Apple TV+ saw a huge uptick in new viewers thanks to Billie Eilish: The World’s a Little Blurry, the documentary that launched in late February.

The win comes in a certain demographic, something that Apple TV+ has apparently not done so well with since its launch. According to Deadline, the new documentary was a big success for the young adult audience. It was so successful, apparently, that the streaming service saw a 33% increase in new viewers.

The documentary started streaming on February 25 in the United States and across the globe where Apple TV+ is available. Apparently nearly half of all viewers came from outside the United States, with the documentary being number one for young adults in Australia, the United Kingdom, Mexico, Brazil, Russia, Germany, the Netherlands, France, and more.

Per the report:

The streamer would not divulge specific numbers — they never do — but I can report that the film became the biggest hit title for young adult audiences that Apple has had so far across its slate of films and TV series. The movie drew a record-breaking 33% new viewers to the service, with young adult audiences fueling the momentum from the moment the film premiered on Thursday, February 25.

While nothing is officially official in this regard, if it is right then Apple has had a pretty successful couple of months. On February 1, it was reported that Apple TV+ had seen its “most-watched weekend” thanks in part to the premiere of the Justin Timberlake-starring Palmer.

Apple TV+ saw a bit of a hit with the Russo Brothers film Cherry, with reviews for the drama not being so hot. But it sounds like the YA audience was pretty happy with the latest documentary.

Did you check out the documentary? If so, what did you think of it?