The “About This Mac” window contains information relating to your computer specifications and OS version, and is useful for quickly checking any of those details. However, it’s a little impersonal, and often (on a Hackintosh), incorrect. If, like me, you enjoy customising your machine to your own personal taste then this guide should help somewhat, by jazzing up the “About This Mac” section.If you own a Hackintosh then this guide may be of especial utility, as their non-Apple components and varied range of specifications can mean that “About This Mac” contains errors, or fails to provide any information at all. For these users the guide may be of functional use. If you’re on a real Mac, it’ll be for more aesthetic purposes.

These edits will work on macOS versions from Yosemite (10.10) to Sierra (10.12). Prior to that the file locations were different, but can still be modified with a little research. Let me know if you need any other file locations, and on which OS, and I’ll try to oblige.

Changes do not always survive a system update, though often do.

For all of these examples, BACK UP the original file to a safe location on your computer before modifying it, in case of a mistake or wanting to revert to stock later.

Changing the System Logo

This section will modify the circular image of your OS version on the main “About This Mac” page. On older OS versions, this used to be an image of your computer hardware, and I still prefer that.

1) Open a Finder window, and navigate to your /Applications folder. Find the /Utilities folder inside, and inside that, the System Information application.

2) Right-click the application and select Show Package Contents.

3) Once inside the application, look inside Contents/Resources. Find the file entitled SystemLogo.tiff.

4) Backup the original file, and then replace it with the image you want to use. It must be renamed to SystemLogo.tiff, SystemLogo.png, SystemLogo.jpg, etc.

5) After a logout/login or reboot the new image should appear in place of the pedestrian Sierra logo. For illustrative purposes I chose an image of the most pathetic piece of hardware known to Rick-kind.

For future reference, the full file path for this image is:

/Applications/Utilities/System Information.app/Contents/Resources/SystemLogo.tiff

To revert, simply replace your backup of the original file, overwriting your edited image.

Changing the Model Name and Year

This section will change the reported hardware model and production year on the main “About This Mac” page. On a Hackintosh this page will usually report the Model you have selected in your SMBIOS settings, but you might want it to say something different. For example, for best performance on my hack, I have an iMac model set in my SMBIOS. However, the case I made for it is from an old G5, so I want that model to be reported instead in “About This Mac”. If you are on a real Mac this will likely be just, as they apparently say, “for funsies”.

1) Open a Finder window and navigate to your home User folder (the one containing your Documents, Pictures, Movies, etc.)

2) Inside that, open the Library folder. If you cannot see it, it may be hidden. You can find it with our guide. Do not confuse it with /Library by mistake, it must be /Users/YOUR_USERNAME/Library.

3) Inside the folder, open Preferences and look for the file entitled com.apple.SystemProfiler.plist.

4) Copy the file, and paste one somewhere as a backup. Then paste another copy to your Desktop to edit. Do not try to edit the file in place, it will not work.

5) Right-click the copy on your Desktop and open it with your .plist editor of choice. I use TextWrangler, which is free on the App Store.

6) In the editor, look through the file for the CPU Names entry which describes the current Model and Year of your computer. Mine originally said “iMac 27-inch, Late 2012”.

7) Edit the text in that line to report your preferred hardware name and year, or whatever text you like. Save the document and exit.

8) Drag the edited file from your Desktop back into the ~/Library/Preferences folder we got it from to overwrite the original. Authenticate with your user password if required.

9) After a reboot the changes should be visible in the “About This Mac” window.

For future reference, the full file path for the document to edit is:

/Users/YOUR_USERNAME/Library/Preferences/com.apple.SystemProfiler.plist

To revert, simply replace your backup of the original file, overwriting your edited .plist.

Changing the processor name

This setting may allow you to change the processor name, but I have had mixed results. It worked on my Hackintosh, but not on my MacBook Pro, so your mileage may vary.

1) Open a Finder window, navigate to the System folder, and then to the Library folder inside. (Not the “Library” folder we visited in the Model name section).

2) Inside Library, go to PrivateFrameworks, and find AppleSystemInfo.framework.

3) Inside this framework, navigate to /Versions/A/Resources/. Then find the folder for your system language. If yours is English, go to English.lproj.

4) Inside that folder, find the file AppleSystemInfo.strings. Copy the file, and paste one somewhere as a backup. Then paste another copy to your Desktop to edit. Do not try to edit the file in place, it will not work.

5) Right-click the copy on your Desktop and open it with your editor of choice.

6) In the editor, look through the file for the UnknownCPUKind entry which describes non-standard CPU models. Mine originally said “Unknown”.

7) Edit the text in that line to report your preferred CPU model and speed, or whatever text you like. Save the document and exit.

8) Hackintosh only, Mac users skip to Step 9. 

Open up your Clover config.plist, and under the CPU section set the Type to Unknown. I used Clover Configurator for this step but it can be done manually too.

9) Drag the edited file from your Desktop back into the folder we got it from to overwrite the original. Authenticate with your user password if required.

10) After a reboot the changes should be visible in the “About This Mac” window.

And there you have it! My under-powered robot’s CPU is now correctly reported. Remember this section may not work for you, especially on a real Mac, as it will probably not default to the “Unknown CPU” field. Setting the CPU type to “Unknown” in Clover on a Hackintosh forces it to use the field, and therefore work.

For future reference, the full file path for the document to edit is:

/System/Library/PrivateFrameworks/AppleSystemInfo.framework/Versions/A/Resources/YOUR_SYSTEM_LANGUAGE.lproj/AppleSystemInfo.strings

To revert, simply replace your backup of the original file, overwriting your edited .strings file.

Changing the Displays image

This edit is one of the most useful, as many people use external displays, and they come from many third-parties. Consequently, a generic icon is used by Apple in the “Displays” section of “About This Mac”, and in the “Displays” section of “System Preferences”. Many people will wish to change this to an image of their specific external display model.

1) Open a Finder window, and navigate to the System folder. From there, open Library, then CoreServices, and locate the file CoreTypes.bundle.

2) Right-click CoreTypes.bundle and select Show Package Contents. From there, go to /Contents/Resources, and find the file called public.generic-lcd.icns.

3) Make a backup of this file somewhere safe, and then place an image of your own display, or whatever image you like, into that folder. It will replace the generic display image. Make sure the file you place there is called public.generic-lcd.icns. The file must be in .icns format. I use Image2Icon for this; it is available on the App Store for free.

4) After a logout/login or reboot, your changes should be visible.

For future reference, the full file path for the document to edit is:

/System/Library/CoreServices/CoreTypes.bundle/Contents/Resources/public.generic-lcd.icns

To revert, simply replace your backup of the original file, overwriting your edited .icns file.

Done!

As you can see by browsing through, many other basic system images and pieces of text are contained in the files and folders we have been editing in this article. With a bit of digging you can find many other useful things to change in the locations we have been looking.

Just make sure to always make a backup of any files before changing them, and preferably to have a clone of your whole system too. That way if you delete a truly crucial file you can boot from the clone and replace it.

Was this guide helpful to you? Did you use it on a Mac or a Hackintosh? Do you know of any other similar customisations which I missed off the list? Let me know if you do!

  • 7000rpm

    Nice nice

  • JRDN

    Wonder if Apple knows about this.. I know that Apple store employees use the “About This Mac” area to see the descriptions of the current Mac. Now with the ability to change it, I wonder how people could make use of it.

    • Aryan Chaurasia

      haha i did that

  • Curious2017

    im having problem with the permission, can you help with it. thanks!

    • LEK56

      Same here. Cannot change the Resource file contents.

      • Dziarski

        You have to disable SIP and “sudo mv” it into 😉 Remember to reenable sip after you’re done.

      • Joaquim Barbosa

        Sorry for the slow reply LEK56. You need to disable SIP before making your changes. Our guide will show you how:

        http://www.idownloadblog.com/2016/02/01/disable-rootless-system-integrity-protection/

        Once the changes are made, you can (and probably should) re-enable it. Hope this helps!

      • LEK56

        Indeed. And here’s the kicker: I was in IT for decades, specializing in Mac installations. This is pretty embarrassing. 🙂

      • Joaquim Barbosa

        Haha, no worries mate. I should really have mentioned it in the article, but as I did it on my hackintosh I didn’t run into the problem. It has bootloader settings which keep SIP permanently partially disabled so I never came up against the error. You’re not the only person who had the problem though! Thanks for reading.

    • Joaquim Barbosa

      Sorry Curious2017, I only just saw this! It’s probably because of SIP. You need to disable it before making your changes. Our guide will show you how:

      http://www.idownloadblog.com/2016/02/01/disable-rootless-system-integrity-protection/

      Once the changes are made, you can (and probably should) re-enable it. Hope this helps!

  • ZeD

    My life just doesn’t feel complete without that wallpaper, please post it :). Thanks.

    • Joaquim Barbosa

      Hi ZeD, the wallpaper is a stock one from Sierra, but perhaps only 10.12.2… What macOS version are you running? If you don’t already have it, I can post it for you. Cheers!

  • Josiah

    How do I just “replace” the logo? I can’t move the original because it tells me it is required my macOS and I can’t put the new one in the folder even after renaming it

    • Josiah

      It is the same with changing the default display image. it won’t let me modify it

    • Joaquim Barbosa

      Sorry for the slow reply Josiah. You need to disable SIP before making your changes, or it won’t let you! Our guide will show you how:

      http://www.idownloadblog.com/2016/02/01/disable-rootless-system-integrity-protection/

      Once the edits have been made, you can (and probably should) re-enable SIP. Hope this helps!

      • Josiah

        Thank you very much this does help

    • SlapAClown

      Same for me Josiah! ARGHHH. HELP PLS JOAQUIM!!

      I cant even change privileges on info so i can change or move it or switch it out.. not having it!
      See, i have the right file and changed the file ext on t5he one i want…
      Also see the system 1 is LOCKED…HELP

      Ok ill try the SIP disabling Joaquim…. u might wish t edit yr article as i never had trouble with yr stuff till this one…

  • Dominic Wood

    Help I can’t figure this out on OS sierra can’t find anywhere to change info in plist files HELP

  • Dominic Wood

    I can’t find any of the files there all missing

  • Jet Letters

    Does anyone know how to change the ram part?

  • I’ve been looking around for a little while now for the text name of the monitor (ex. in the upper right of the final image above says “Apple LED Cinema Display”). I was able to change the image with no problem but can’t find the text and I’m annoyed by the generic name that my monitor shows. Any suggestions on which file it’s in?

  • SlapAClown

    HELP PLS?
    Thanks Joaquim as this is a great fun idea but i am having an issue. All is fine regarding the rewrite of .plist files but the image… it wont let me drag it out, export it out… put my replacement in same folder etc… it’s NOT HAVING IT and i even tried to change all permissions in the info files so i could Read/Write but won’t let me change that either. (never had it fight me in System files that i couldn’t tweak before on prev macs-this is the new MBP )

    So then i tried IMPORTING my new image etc… NADA… still said i didn’t have permission… is there a terminal command for it? how did you do it wth such ease that you didn’t note it here?

    Thnx much in advance.. i always enjoy yr bits and never had a quirk before…

    • SlapAClown

      OOPS>.. just saw that Joaquim replied to JOSIAH below with same issue.. maybe u can disregard my request… going to try now

  • Faded Polo

    but how can u change the memory slot sticks image
    I’ve been trying to change from two 4gb images to a pic of two cupcakes for
    about a year now lol everything on my iMac is cupcakes but this one thing lol its driving me crazy and i can’t find anyone that knows how to change it. any help anyone ??? even will to send some money threw paypal for a solution THANKS

  • Ahdan Fawwaz

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/5aa8334dece1e11dd48c09d3526b509a97ffb97bed01d5ac1693d07fe72741fc.png may I ask your file to change the name of processor? I can’t change the name cause the file is different with your example 🙂

    • Keo Streetball

      lol

      • Keo Streetball

        so ez for me

  • Carlos Rodríguez

    How do I change the display icon for a hackintosh laptop? The public.generic-lcd.icns doesn’t apply here.

    My smbios is MacbookPro8,1 so I shoud replace com.apple.macbookpro13-unibody.icns but no luck.

    Any ideas?

    Cheers!

  • kushal santhosh

    My SIP is disabled but even after changing the file in ~/Library/Preferences and after a reboot nothing has changed. Please help! 😀

  • 金春 鄧

    is there a app to do that?