Isaac Newton’s Gravity [iTunes Link] was created by Namco and is an intuitive physics puzzler in which you will need to successfully guide a ball across a board to hit a switch.

Each level will give you different shaped pieces such as cubes or blocks to place on a map. You will select each piece by simply tapping on it and then rotating it in any direction.

Next, drag, drop and place it on the map. Once all of the pieces are set, hit the play button and your ball will roll out and hopefully reach it’s destination…

The physics elements of Gravity is top notch. The blocks and pieces will fall and react to each other realistically, which can make the game extremely challenging.

The game play is simple but addicting. Some levels were very hard to finish and really gave me an enormous sense of satisfaction when clearing them. The developers also added a hint feature which is always welcome, especially for me!

This was extremely helpful for some of the more difficult levels; however I would like to note that sometimes the game wanted only perfect solutions. Let me explain. There were times where I was stuck and had to use the hint feature. After using up all of my precious hints I realized that I had 95% of the blocks set up correctly, but couldn’t finish because of the remaining 5%.  In this instance, I think the physics were a bit over realistic.

The design of this game was fantastic, and I would like to point out that the music is light and easy and matches this game perfectly. Graphically, Gravity is very polished as well.

Gravity is probably one of the most enjoyable puzzlers that I have reviewed (see: Doodle Fit, Trainyard, Cut the Rope, and Slice it!). The mixture between the realistic physics engine, great graphics and soundtrack, plus 50 levels, is a great package for only $2.99 in the App Store.

Good Points

1. Simple game yet difficult and satisfying after passing the levels

2. For some reason I loved the sound track in this game, made me feel at ease 🙂

3. Wonderful physics engine

Bad Points

1. Sometimes frustrating when you realize that you almost had it right

2. Not enough hints