I can’t imagine owning an iPhone or other Apple handheld without the addition of the App Store. I’ve said before that I believe it to be the greatest asset to the iOS platform. So what’s the problem?

Apple Investor outlines the possibility that a vague module and a totalitarian controlled acceptance process has caused developers to walk on egg shells thus stunting their creativity. Some say the terms of service are often inconsistent, but as with any report like this, there are two lines of thought to be heard…

Dave Haupert from DDH Software first talks about being confused if a certain function of his mobile database app is acceptable, then announces that the iPad version of the app was forced to be altered. He stated the following regarding the app entitled  HanDBase and the function that was in violation:

Apple rejected this because they thought the bubbles were using the iPad’s pop overs. There were already pop overs on the screen in some cases and they don’t allow more than one pop over on the screen at a time. Even though our bubbles weren’t pop overs, there was no recourse for us to argue the point, so I simply removed these valuable hints. Customers have since emailed quite often wondering how to do something that was previously explained in the bubbles.

Not all developers take issue with Apple’s way of maneuvering. A developer for the popular GoodReader app, Yuri Selukoff, may not agree with some USB issues he’s had trouble with but overall thinks the App Store is doing a fine job. Selukoff stated this about the process:

If you plan to sell your app to millions, you must be super cautious about what you do. Apple’s SDK Agreement is reasonable. I don’t see anything in there that really limits us doing what we want do. I can’t imagine Apple pulling a normal legitimate app that doesn’t do anything wrong.

Some may say that it’s a lot easier to comply when your app is raking in the cash but nevertheless it shows some developers are fine with the way things are. I wish I had the time and ability to create my own entry and be able to give you my first hand experience, but until then I’ll be amongst those who have to take people’s word for it.

What do you think? Is it possible that Apple has created a process that contradicts its original vision? If so there’s always Cydia, right? Let us know your opinion in the creation station known as the comment section.

  • I think Apple’s policies are to protect the end user. If you look at some of the poor quality apps in the Android Marketplace, you will see why this level of guidance is important.

    The Apple developer guidelines are not meant to “control” the developer, rather create a positive experience for the end user and maintain optimum hardware performance.

    That being said, bad apps make it through the process. I’ve even had an app of my own make it through with a glaring memory leak before (since resolved). It’s certainly the exception and not the rule, but it does happen.

    The reviewers are human and have different interpretations on what they find to be acceptable or not. I have a framework that is the same code base that one reviewer rejected and another approved.

    In all, I consider it a good process and I think it’s in the best interested of the users and developers.

    • Yboy403

      You’re kidding, right? There are plenty of crapps on the store, and plenty of amazing apps on the Cydia store that Apple just didn’t like (Activator, BiteSMS, SBsettings, Wireless Sync, Synchronicity). I believe that it’s just a way for Apple to retain control over its platform and sell dev licenses. Kind of like a mega powertrip.
      Y