Hacking

Hacker Luca Todesco advises jailbreakers to avoid updating to iOS 10.2

While there’s still no public jailbreak for iOS 10 to date, there have been some very convincing demos of personal jailbreaks for it, most of which have come out of the woodwork from none other than well-known iOS hacker Luca Todesco.

Amid the current jailbreak situation, Todesco is now seen warning netizens that if they have any intention of jailbreaking iOS 10 in the future, they should stay on iOS 10.1.1 and refrain from updating to iOS 10.2 when it comes out.

Apple said to be meeting up with high profile hackers as part of its new bug bounty program

Apple has reportedly reached out to a handful of high profile iPhone and Mac hackers to try and secure their operating systems from exploits that could be used maliciously or for jailbreaking.

The hackers are expected to meet at the Cupertino campus some time this month, where they can earn up to $200,000 for finding major exploits as part of Apple's bug bounty program.

LogDog for iOS lets you monitor the security of your online accounts

LogDog, a service originally made popular on the Android platform for keeping your various online accounts safe from unauthorized activity, is now launching for iOS.

With LogDog, you can actively monitor your online accounts and keep an eye on where the most recent logins came from, what operating system and web browser was used, and more.

If you're always worried about your security, or even your privacy, this is an app you'll want to check out.

Developer manages to run Windows 95 on an Apple Watch

A developer for the Apple Watch has found a way to emulate the Windows 95 operating system experience on Apple's flagship wearable accessory.

Albeit nothing more than a concept, it really does show off how powerful the Apple Watch's internal hardware really is. This is just one of those things you have to see to believe.

FBI confirms a tool it bought to unlock terrorist’s iPhone 5c does not work on iPhone 5s and newer

James Comey, Director of the Federal Bureau of iPhones—that is, Investigation—confirmed in an interview with CNN yesterday that a tool that the agency had purchased from a third-party to unlock San Bernardino shooter Syed Farook's iPhone 5c cannot be used to bypass security protections on newer models, from the iPhone 5s onward.

This implies the tool relies on the fact that the iPhone 5c and earlier models lack hardware features like the Secure Enclave embedded in Apple's mobile processors (from the iPhone 5s's A7 chip and onward) which keeps encrypted sensitive information and stuff like the number of passcode attempts isolated from the rest of the system.

Phishing emails: what they are and how to report them

Emails are a popular way to keep in touch with people, be it friends, family, or co-workers, but often companies that you deal business with will send you the occasional promotional email if you signed up for subscriptions.

Sometimes, you get an email that you think is legit, and it turns out it's just a fake email pretending to be something it's not and it tries to get you to click on stuff or give up your personal information. These emails are malicious and they're known as phishing emails.

In this piece, we'll go over some of the things you can look for to tell if the emails you're getting are legitimate, or if they're a con artist trying to scam you of your personal information.

How Apple secures its products and services

Apple's security and privacy features that come standard on every iOS device, such as end-to-end encryption and Activation Lock, are getting all the talk around the internet as of late as the Apple vs. FBI case continues to escalate.

What can be learned from this case is not only does Apple want to protect your privacy, but the a large number of American people also want to have their privacy. The FBI, on the other hand, wants a quick way to get into any iPhone they deem "suspicious" so long as they can get a court order to search it.

So just how secure is your Apple data, and what protection standards does Apple have in place for you? That's just what we're going to talk about in this piece.

How to check to see if your iPhone is infected by the KeyRaider malware

DylibSearch is a new jailbreak app that helps you quickly check to see if you have any known malicious tweaks, like KeyRaider, installed on your device. It does so by scanning the contents of the .dylib files contained in the filesystem's MobileSubstrate directory.

By checking for known strings contained in malicious files, DylibSearch can quickly tell you if your iPhone is infected, or if it has a clean bill of health. This open source tweak is available by means of a special third-party repo, which you'll find inside of this post.

Apple issues Mac App Store patch for XARA exploits as additional fixes are ‘in progress’

A cross application resource attack (XARA) that researchers at Indiana University, Georgia Tech and China’s Peking University publicized last week seems to have been partially addressed as Apple issued a server-side fix on the Mac App Store to block malicious apps and secure app data.

Additional fixes are in the works for the XARA exploits on both iOS and OS X, a company spokesperson told iMore. XARA exploits allow malicious apps to steal iCloud credentials of a user, access private data in apps like 1Password and Evernote, hijack their iCloud Keychain passwords and more.

Major security flaws leave iOS and OS X vulnerable to wide ranging password theft

Your confidential information ranging from web passwords in Chrome and other browsers to app passwords to banking credentials stored and synced between devices though Apple's iCloud Keychain service—even data you thought was stored safely in password managers like 1Password and LastPass—can be easily compromised due to a trio of major vulnerabilities discovered in Apple's desktop and mobile operating systems.

As discovered by a team of researchers at Indiana University, Georgia Tech and China's Peking University and reported by The Register, Keychain's access control lists, URL schemes and OS X's app containers contain flaws creating serious attack vectors.