Leaked camera sensor hints at optical image stabilization for 4.7-inch iPhone 7 model

By , Aug 18, 2016


French blog NowhereElse.fr posted this morning claimed photographs of the iPhone 7’s back-facing iSight camera sensor. The leaked image strongly indicates that the 4.7-inch iPhone 7 model will have optical image stabilization, a feature previously exclusive to iPhone 6/6s Plus models.

For those wondering, the pictured part lacks an Apple logo likely because it’s a pre-production component. Assuming the part is genuine, the single-lens iSight camera on the 4.7-inch iPhone 7 may have relocated its L-shaped cable connector from the bottom center to the lower right side of the sensor.

Optical image stabilization is evidenced by the four cutouts around the package to allow the camera lens to move slightly in all directions to compensate for the shakiness.

The flagship iPhone 7 Plus model, of course, is widely expected to feature a dual-lens shooter for improved low-light photography, optical zoom and more.

By and large, the iPhone 6s is Apple’s biggest camera jump ever: the back shooter went from eight to twelve megapixels for photo capture and from 1080p to 4K video capture. The front-facing FaceTime camera on the iPhone 6s was improved substantially as well, going from paltry 1.2 megapixels to a five-megapixel shooter with 720p video recording.

Source: NowhereElse.fr (Google Translate)

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  • Dao Sasone

    I hope they adpot more low light like Samsungs current phone

    • Abhijeet Gupta

      Fingers crossed

    • Rowan09

      They do every phone upgrade.

  • Jamessmooth

    Thank you for addressing the lack of apple logo. That was the first question I asked myself.

  • Hussain Alsanona

    It seems OIS coming to the 4.7″ iPhone 7. Finger crossed!

    • Burge

      Say what ?

      • Chindavon

        Cuz the smaller iPone always gets the shaft when it comes to OIS.

      • Burge

        Thats iOS. And still what are you on about?

      • Chindavon

        Brutha you are lost. It’s OIS, which stands for “Optical Image Stabilization”.