January 2007 iPhone introduction (Steve Jobs, multitouch patented slide)

I clearly remember September 2008 when the HTC G1 debuted in partnership with Google and T-Mobile. Google’s first usable Android-driven handset arrived some fifteen months after the iPhone had gone on sale in June 2007 and tech die-hards were startled that it didn’t incorporate the pinch-zoom gesture.

Android would be deployed across lots more handsets before eventually implementing not only pinch-zooming, but other familiar iPhone features as well. There was an unconfirmed rumor at the time that Google removed multitouch gestures from initial Android builds at Apple’s request.

In all honesty, the notion seemed a bit crazy. Why would Google take the iPhone head on and yet cave in to Apple’s demands? According to a new 272-page book titled Dogfight: How Apple And Google Went To War And Started a Revolution by Fred Vogelstein, Apple’s then CEO Steve Jobs imposed that choice on Google’s Android head Andy Rubin by sheer willpower…

Jobs thought Rubin was a “big, arrogant f**k,” according to a Dogfight excerpt spotted by Jay Yarow of BusinessInsider. The book also shatters some common misconceptions about Apple, Google, the iPhone and Android.

The Internet giant started work on Android after snapping up Andy Rubin’s startup for about $50 million back in 2005. At that particular point in time, Apple was already developing the iPhone project, Google’s then CEO Eric Schmidt still had a seat on Apple’s board of directors and Jobs had trust in Google’s cofounders Sergey Brin and Larry Page.

Despite Apple going to great lengths to keep the project shrouded in secrecy, people in the industry were aware that Apple was attempting to build a cell phone.

Andy Rubin and Android logo

Ethan Beard, an early Android business development executive told the book author:

We knew that Apple was going to announce a phone.

Everyone knew that.

We just didn’t think it would be that good.

When Steve Jobs took the MacWorld Expo stage to deliver his legendary January 2007 iPhone introduction, Rubin was driving in a Las Vegas cab watching the keynote unfold.

He made the driver pull over so he could see the whole thing. He said, “Holy crap, I guess we’re not going to launch that phone.”

Indeed, here’s what an early Android handset prototype looked like pre-iPhone.

prototype android

“What we had looked so … nineties,” an Android engineer told Vogelstein.

He was referring to the software Google was ready to launch a few months after the iPhone hit the market. Seeing what it’s up against, Google then rebooted Android by starting from scratch and eventually released the G1 in September 2008.

By that time, the iPhone had already been fifteen months on the market.

After seeing the G1 and new Android build, Jobs went berserk:

“Everything is a f**king rip off of what we’re doing,” Jobs said of Android.

The mercurial CEO insisted Google make a bunch of changes:

There was a meeting with Jobs, Scott Forstall, who designed the iPhone’s software, and Google’s Larry Page, Alan Eustace, and Rubin. Vogelstein cautions that it was hard to know exactly what happened in the meeting, but says that it was confrontational and nasty.

“It got incredibly personal,” says one Apple executive who was briefed by Jobs on the meeting. “Jobs said that Rubin was steamed, telling him his position was anti-innovation.

And this is where Steve was demeaning to Andy, saying Andy was trying to be like him, look like him, have the same haircut, the same glasses, the same style.”

Interestingly enough, Rubin himself was described as being a tyrant with Google employees, abrasive and difficult to work with. Anyway, as a result of the meeting Google had agreed to drop multitouch features like pinch zooming.

iphone pinch to zoom
Steve Jobs demonstrates pinch-zooming at the January 2007 iPhone introduction.

The company also changed the Android phone unlock feature and Jobs even told Google how to take things out of Android. Rubin went through the roof over the concessions his bosses were willing to make in order to avoid Jobs’s wrath.

Bottom line: after a few Android iterations, Google felt confident enough to add Apple’s iPhone features like the pinch zoom gesture, prompting the iPhone maker to go thermonuclear on Android by launching proxy legal fights against prominent Android backers like HTC, Motorola and Samsung.

As for Rubin, he eventually stepped down as Android’s lead in March 2013.

One juicy gossip has it that Rubin was forced to quit, allegedly because current CEO and co-founder Larry Page saw him as a threat because his influence was growing exponentially on booming Android device activations.

Hungry for more?

Here’s another sample excerpt, via Amazon.

The fifty-five miles from Campbell to San Francisco is one of the nicest commutes anywhere. The journey mostly zips along the Junipero Serra Freeway, a grand and remarkably empty highway that abuts the east side of the Santa Cruz Mountains. Known as 280 to locals, it is one of the best places in Silicon Valley to spot a start-up tycoon speed-testing his Ferrari and one of the worst places for cell phone reception. For Andy Grignon in his Porsche Carrera, therefore, it was the perfect place for him to be alone with his thoughts early on January 8, 2007.

This wasn’t Grignon’s typical route to work. He was a senior engineer at Apple in Cupertino, the town just west of Campbell. His morning drive typically covered seven miles and took exactly fifteen minutes. But today was different. He was going to watch his boss, Steve Jobs, make history at the Macworld trade show in San Francisco. Apple fans had for years begged Jobs to put a cell phone inside their iPods so they could stop carrying two devices in their pockets. Jobs was about to fulfill that wish. Grignon and some colleagues would spend the night at a nearby hotel, and at 10:00 a.m. the following day they—along with the rest of the world—would watch Jobs unveil the first iPhone.

Getting invited to one of Jobs’s famous product announcements was supposed to be a great honor. It anointed you as a player. Only a few dozen Apple employees, including top executives, got an invite. The rest of the spots were reserved for Apple’s board of directors, CEOs of partners—such as Eric Schmidt of Google and Stan Sigman at AT&T—and journalists from around the world. Grignon got an invite because he was the senior engineer for all the radios in the iPhone. This is a big job. Cell phones do innumerable useful things for us today, but at their most basic they are fancy two-way radios. Grignon was in charge of the equipment that allowed the phone to be a phone. If the phone didn’t make calls, connect with Bluetooth headsets, or connect to Wi-Fi setups, Grignon had to answer for it. As one of the iPhone’s earliest engineers, he’d dedicated two and a half years of his life—often seven days a week—to the project. Few deserved to be there more than he did.

But as Grignon drove north, he didn’t feel excited. He felt terrified. Most onstage product demonstrations in Silicon Valley are canned. The thinking goes, why let bad Internet or cell phone connections ruin an otherwise good presentation? Jobs’s presentations were live, however. It was one of the things that made his shows so captivating. But for those in the background, such as Grignon, few parts of the job caused more stress. Grignon couldn’t remember the last time a Jobs show of this magnitude had gone sideways. Part of what made Steve Jobs such a legend was that noticeable product-demo glitches almost never happened. But Grignon found it hard to recall the last time Jobs was so unprepared going into a show.

Grignon had been part of the iPhone launch-preparation team at Apple and later at the presentation site in San Francisco’s Moscone Center. But he had rarely seen Jobs make it all the way through his ninety-minute show without a glitch. Jobs had been rehearsing for five days, yet even on the last day of rehearsals the iPhone was still randomly dropping calls, losing the Internet connection, freezing, or just shutting down.

“At first it was just really cool to be at rehearsals at all—kind of like a cred badge. ‘Fuck yeah, I get to hang out with Steve,’” Grignon said. Like everything else that surrounded Jobs, the preparations were as secret as a U.S. missile attack on Afghanistan. Those who were truly in felt as if they were at the center of the universe. From Thursday through the end of the following week, Apple completely took over Moscone. Backstage it built an eight-by-eight-foot electronics lab to house and test the iPhones. Next to that it built a greenroom with a sofa for Jobs. Then it posted more than a dozen security guards twenty-four hours a day in front of those rooms and at doors throughout the building. No one got in or out without having his or her ID electronically checked and compared with a master list that Jobs had personally approved. More security checkpoints needed to be cleared once visitors got inside. The auditorium where Jobs was rehearsing was off-limits to all but a small group of executives. Jobs was so obsessed with leaks that he tried to have all the contractors Apple had hired for the announcement—from people manning booths and doing demos to those responsible for lighting and sound—sleep in the building the night before his presentation. Aides talked him out of it.

“It quickly got really uncomfortable,” Grignon said. “Very rarely did I see him become completely unglued. It happened. But mostly he just looked at you and very directly said in a very loud and stern voice, ‘You are fucking up my company,’ or, ‘If we fail, it will be because of you.’ He was just very intense. And you would always feel an inch tall [when he was done chewing you out].” Grignon said that you would always ask yourself two questions during one of these lectures: “‘Is it my shit that broke this time?’ and ‘Is it the nth time it broke or the first time?’—because that actually mattered. The nth time would frustrate him, but by then he might have figured out a way around it. But if it was the first time, it added a whole new level of instability to the program.” Grignon, like everyone else at rehearsals, knew that if those glitches showed up during the real presentation, Jobs would not be blaming himself for the problems, he would come after people like Grignon. “It felt like we’d gone through the demo a hundred times and that each time something went wrong,” Grignon said. “It wasn’t a good feeling.”

*   *   *
The iPhone didn’t work right for a good reason; it wasn’t close to being finished. Jobs was showing off a prototype. He just didn’t want the public to know that. But the list of things that still needed to be done before the iPhone could be sold was enormous. A production line had yet to be set up. Only about a hundred iPhones even existed, all of them of varying degrees of quality. Some had noticeable gaps between the screen and the plastic edge, others had scuff marks on the screen. Thus no one in the public was allowed to touch an iPhone after Jobs unveiled it, despite a day of press briefings and a whole exhibit set up for them in the convention center. The worry was that even the best prototypes wouldn’t stand close scrutiny, Grignon said. They’d look fine at a distance and for Jobs’s demo, but if you held one in your hand, “You would laugh and say, ‘Wow, this thing really looks unfinished.’”

The phone’s software was in even worse shape. A big chunk of the previous four months had been consumed figuring out why the iPhone’s processor and its cell radio wouldn’t reliably communicate. This huge problem was akin to a car with an engine that occasionally doesn’t respond to the accelerator, or wheels that occasionally don’t respond to the brake pedal. “It almost brought the iPhone program to a halt,” Grignon said. “We had never seen a problem this complicated.” This was ordinarily not a problem for phone makers, but Apple’s obsession with secrecy had kept Samsung, the manufacturer of the phone’s processor, and Infineon, the maker of the phone’s cell radio, from working together until Apple, in desperation, flew teams of engineers from each company to Cupertino to help fix the problem.

Jobs rarely backed himself into corners like this. He was well-known as a master taskmaster, seeming to always know just how hard he could push his staff so that they delivered the impossible. But he always had a backup, a Plan B, that he could go to if his timetable was off. Six months prior he’d shown off Apple’s upcoming operating system, Leopard. But that was after letting the date for the final unveiling slip.

But Jobs had no choice but to show off the iPhone. He had given this opening keynote at every Macworld since he’d returned as Apple’s CEO in 1997, and because he gave public presentations only once or twice a year, he had conditioned Apple fans to expect big things from them. He’d introduced iTunes here, the iMac that looked like a fancy desk lamp, the Safari web browser, the Mac mini, and the iPod shuffle.

It wasn’t just his own company that Jobs had to worry about disappointing this time. AT&T was expecting Jobs to unveil the iPhone at Macworld too. In exchange for being the exclusive carrier of the iPhone in the United States, AT&T had given Jobs total control of the design, manufacture, and marketing of the iPhone. It had never done anything like this before. If Jobs didn’t launch on time, AT&T could back out of its deal. It’s not hard to explain that a product called the iPhone that couldn’t make calls would sell poorly. Days before, Jobs had flown to Las Vegas to give AT&T’s top mobile executives a limited demo of the iPhone. But they were expecting a full show at Macworld.

Lastly, the iPhone was truly the only cool new thing Apple was working on. The iPhone had been such an all-encompassing project at Apple that this time there was no backup plan. “It was Apple TV or the iPhone,” Grignon said. “And if he had gone to Macworld with just Apple TV [an experimental product back then], the world would have said, ‘What the hell was that?’”

Dogfight is available on the iBookstore for $12.99.

I just bought the book the other day, but haven’t had the time to read it through yet. When I do, I’ll be making sure to blog here about any relevant and previously unknown details which led to the creation of the iPhone and Android.

  • AndroidDogHeatandSteelersFan

    awesome preview! Wish we can get a sequel from that jobs movie.

    • jocastro

      lol why would you want to see a sequel to the jobs movie?????? lol that just going a little to far lolololololololololol

      • AndroidDogHeatandSteelersFan

        Well just being positive. I love watching movies even if they are good bad or okay. Just as long as it has a good plot. Would be funny if I was to happen because I foresaw the future.

      • jocastro

        i am being positive lol but answer this question.. Do you ever see a sequel to a biography when it comes to movies? lol its highly unlikely that they will make a sequel.

      • AndroidDogHeatandSteelersFan

        ah now that you put it that way. The way that the jobs biography only showed the early timeline with macs and it was compressed. So I’ll stay hopeful for other members because all the biographies that I watch didn’t include as much coming from interactions with Android.

      • Jo

        lolololololololololololololololololololol

  • RarestName

    I was also quite surprised when I read about the relations between Google and Apple. It completely changed my thoughts about the lawsuits. Not to say that they were necessary but how biased so many news blogs are to immediately side Samsung.

  • chumawumba

    Steve certainly had a way with words…

    • John

      Possibly related, possibly not.

      I remember watching the keynote where Steve unveiled “three revolutionary products of this class. Widescreen iPod with touch controls. Revolutionary mobile phone. Breakthrough internet communicator. Widescreen iPod with touch controls. Revolutionary mobile phone. Breakthrough internet communicator. An iPod. A phone. An internet communicator. An iPod. A phone………..ARE YOU GETTING IT?”

  • So it seems like android was indeed a copycat from iOS that time 😉 After iOS introduction, they started again and copied from iOS 😛

    • Christopher

      Before that they were going to copy is from BB

      • John

        Certainly seems everyone copies from the industry leader, and at the time it was BlackBerry, so it makes sense.

      • AndroidDogHeatandSteelersFan

        Microsoft copied Apple and almost made Apple extinct. Will Google do the same thing?

      • Christopher

        Almost…

      • AndroidDogHeatandSteelersFan

        Yes. And Microsoft had felt bad so they invested into Apple.

      • Christopher

        No one gives a squat about how they felt.

      • Idon’t Know

        No. That’s dumb. It was because Microsoft was facing anti trust charges.

      • Idon’t Know

        Except Apple didn’t copy from Blackberry at all.

    • Raashid

      As always, this is just the Apple side of the fence story. They didn’t invent nothing (http://bit ly/1be0Oaq), this is just making it sound like they did.

      • jp2002

        lol. Most of those points are funny, pointing out that android was released 3 years before iOS went public.

        Android release date – 23 September 2008
        iOS release date – June 29, 2007

        Do you know how to calculate dates? Cos if you knew it, you would have just ignored that blog article,

        You must be one of those samsung paid guys to trash talk apple.

      • Juan Herrera

        it didn’t say it released 3 years prior to it.. it said they began working on it in 2005 but if you paid attention, you’d notice that it said by then, Apple was already working on the iphone project which meant iOS was already in existence at that time.. Android’s whole existence sprang from the planning of the iphone.. that kills all the copying talk right there lol

      • Raashid

        Better improve on those reading comprehension skills of yours. Must be one then iTards Apple commanded to ignoramusly accept what they say.

    • Guest

      You related to Taf Khan by any chance? ‘Cause you seem to be as misinformed as he is…

  • Vijay Panjwani

    Read this little faggoids…
    U will know that the whole android, till now is a ripoff of apple’s ios…
    The pinch to zoom, the settings app, the camera UI, the folders in android kitkat have that same transparency… The lockscreen so much resembles ios 7’s, the switches in the settings app, the UI on uninstall an app in gingerbread is a ripoff, the app drawer also consists the same ui like iPhone… And there is much more….

    • AndroidDogHeatandSteelersFan

      Just done differently to avoid a lawsuit. Too bad we didn’t come with it first. Although both devices have enveloped into good personal use for preferences. The iPhones screen is more responsive because of heat. The android is kind of lackluster, but can do so much tweaking and basically relies on being a flagship to continue further in updates.

      • Eddie Leonard

        Heat? LOL, No its not! Its the electrons that flow to and from your finger/skin and the screen -_-

      • AndroidDogHeatandSteelersFan

        No. The iPhone uses heat sensor. Thats why wearing gloves you cant press things. On android you can.

      • Eddie Leonard

        Your serious aren’t you? You really don’t have a clue? Wow… Lemmie explain. Electrons are what makes Modern touch screens so accurate, Our bodies release heat all the time, if what your saying was the case, you would be able to interact with the touch screen without ever touch a finger to the screen. The way the touch screens work is by measuring the amount of electrons that pass through the conductor. These screens can be tuned to pick up on certain amounts electrons. The iPhone’s is tuned pretty low to prevent activation while in your pocket. Most touch screens will receive a flow of electrons even though a wool or cotton glove. Leather, is a no no. Its up to the device manufacturer to set the sensitivity level for their devices…
        I suppose I could have just asked you to explain a modern styli to me since those nibs aren’t warm -_-

      • AndroidDogHeatandSteelersFan

        tl;dr.

      • Eddie Leonard

        And that, my friend is why you will never know jack shit about anything

    • John

      Faggoids?
      That’s a new one.

      • AndroidDogHeatandSteelersFan

        He meant fagdroids.

    • Cyber Jethro

      1. Pinch to zoom was down ages before on the Diamond Touch device.
      2. The camera UI on Android looks NOTHING like IOS7’s. (sadly I thought this was obvious 🙁 )

      3. Transparencies where in Android while Apple was still in the felt and leather design paradigm.
      4. The lock-screen looks like IOS7, yet it predates IOS7?
      5. An uninstall prompt is standard for most operating systems.
      6. The App drawer looks like a grid of Icons? I’ve never seen a gird of icons before in any operating system…right? Except maybe Windows and stuff…
      7. Calling people faggoids is perhaps the most intelligent and mature thing ever, /s

      • Christopher

        And yet it seems like they copied APPLE. Apply some brains instead of quoting stuff form history.

      • Cyber Jethro

        Tell me, I want to learn. How do I apply my brains?

      • Christopher

        By taking your head out of android’s ass for a start.

      • Hwang Lee

        Apple has copied plenty of people too, relax.

      • Christopher

        Yes, they copied the companies who had refined the particular techs to such an extent they were already making millions out of it and APPLE just shamelessly copy pasted it ;), Yes that is what they had been doing.

      • Hwang Lee

        The copied the foundation for many products, I believe that their GUI for their original computers was copied from (or heavily inspired by) Xerox PARC.

      • Christopher

        To copy and refine the tech and to shamelessly copying it are different things.

      • JimGramze

        Apple licensed that that interface from Xerox, purchased it That includes the grid of icons. Apple held Microsoft’s hand, teaching them the GUI to develop Word and Excel for the Mac in 1985. Apple standardized the commands for things like cut, copy, paste, print, save, etc. that are now industry standards. All this and more were ripped off directly from Apple, all the things we take for granted on pretty much every computing device.

      • Cyber Jethro

        I’m sorry for quoting facts. Clearly I was wrong about every verifiable thing I said.

        Perhaps, I should use your last statement as a standard in factual and proper communication.

      • Christopher

        It is ok. Dumbness won’t go away with apologies. You should keep doing what you are doing and what makes you happy

      • Cyber Jethro

        LOL. I get you now. You’re a comedian.

        You sir, fooled me well into thinking you actually believe the drivel you speak.

      • AndroidDogHeatandSteelersFan

        1. Samsung did bring that up of diamondtouch but after reexamination in court. Apple won
        2. The camera UI on android looks a lot more like iPhone unlike first released from the G1.
        3. Don’t understand what you’re talking about
        4. The design of a lockscreen copied Apple.
        5. The uninstall prompt on a “smartphone” os was copied from Apple.
        6. App drawer was copied as an alternative to having more apps on in a single page because of limitation of 3 max pages on G1. Windows didn’t exist back then which made this point invalid.
        7. I agree calling other peoples name is not the right way to describe others. But people can be intelligent and make stupid decisions wether or not they anyone thinks a immature-free person exist.

      • Cyber Jethro

        1. Apple won? I guess that means they invented multi- touch.
        2. The current Android camera looks nothing like IOS7’s. There much less chrome.
        3. Parts of Android that were translucent/transparent before IOS, Notification pane, search bar, etc. This is a design trend that was well established before IOS7, but now all of a sudden, Android copied transparency?
        4. That’s not what Panjwani said.
        5. I had a Palm Treo, it has pop-up asking me to confirm an uninstall.
        6. I made reference to any operation system, computer or phone. My Palm Treo also had an app grid, though not as the primary home-screen.
        7. “Read this little faggoids” << You're defending that?

      • AndroidDogHeatandSteelersFan

        not sure if sarcastic but, what is ruled in all fairness in court came out as apple. palm treo was not brought into court because they sold out in 2010. thus android still copied ios. I am not defending that. I am saying any intelligent person can make or say stupid things so don’t insult on their mistake rather than to just tell them that it is not right to say.

      • Cyber Jethro

        Palm Treo was a bad example, how about the Xerox Alto from 1973? That would the first example of applications on a grid. Aligning icons into pages and grids is not a concept Apple created.

      • Christopher

        Yeah, these kins of explanations have always been used by shameless rip offs and copy cats with no imagination at all. Hey, I can copy that because you didn’t create it even though you worked your ass off to refine it but what the hell our buyers are shameless too like us. 😉

      • Cyber Jethro

        There’s an interesting Documentary online called “Everything Is A Remix”. It’s free, and somewhere on vimeo.

      • AndroidDogHeatandSteelersFan

        that was a computer not a smartphone.

      • JimGramze

        A smartphone is a computer.

      • AndroidDogHeatandSteelersFan

        AHHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

      • JimGramze

        But it is something Apple paid for the rights to. Apple bought it from Xerox.

      • Christopher

        Fandroids always cry.

      • AndroidDogHeatandSteelersFan

        I understand your dislikes for Android users, but please don’t make ignorant comments. Everyone has different choices. Don’t make either sides look bad.

      • Christopher

        Well the comments would stop when those fandroids would stop thinking that they are very smart because they got an android phone. That is such a funny thing.

      • AndroidDogHeatandSteelersFan

        I got both but no need for insults man. Just ignore the ignorant comments.

      • mehrab

        the app store is a big copy too the idea of devs making apps and you downloading them and all

      • AndroidDogHeatandSteelersFan

        Cydia did the same thing how come you are not saying anything against them? Amazon also has an app store now too. Everyone has an app store. It has been grown to be essential for each ecosystem.

    • Dakota Hester

      OK, that’s the Apple side Now let’s see the Android side
      Spotlight search, notification drawer, folders, lock screen shortcuts, quick settings, Siri, recent page action…
      Background wallpapers, front-facing cameras, fingerprint scanners, multitasking, 4G, LTE, Dual-core…
      Things we have YOU don’t have
      Widgets, Bluetooth support lock screen widgets, Quad-core, true multitasking, app integration, launchers, quick-view, IR blaster, expanded notifications, active screens, etc.
      Oh, and good English, iSheep.
      As much as I will admit, everything up until honeycomb not our finest hour. And Samsung still can’t get past the gingerbread layout.

      • Stormy08

        “Things we have YOU don’t have.”

        We? You?
        You are NOT Samsung, and I am NOT Apple. You and me are end-users of their respective products. And, as end-users, we should not be fighting their war. Just sit back and enjoy the benefits.

      • mehrab

        widgets are things to stare at, their useless true multitasking my head you obviously know nothing about apple apple allows some all of its stock apps to truly multitask and allowed skype and some other apps to multitaskin in the background and on ios 7 all apps multitask see a speed test of nexus 5 vs iphone 5s on youtube the 5s trumps the s800

  • dev29

    Yeah we all know ios was the basis of all new tactile OS, but nowadays android is better than iOS, iOS7 is nothing you couldnt achieve with Sbsettings + winterboard, the only new things arw the lag and slow transitions, i miss you Jobs :'(

    • John

      Except you don’t have to jailbreak. I think that’s the difference.
      Most jailbreakers I have seen comment on iOS 7 are now saying they don’t feel the need to do so anymore… It’s just a shame it’s taken so long.

    • John

      As for missing Steve, I’m kinda glad he’s not there anymore. I think Tim acknowledges there’s more that needs to be done with iOS and the users WANT more and he will GIVE more. Steve was very controlling.

  • Christopher

    And fandroids will deny all this as usual. Dumb goats.

    • John

      Deny…deny what? You have no proof this happened!
      – Every Fandriod EVER, 2009 to today.

      • Christopher

        Shameless will always be shameless.

      • Christopher

        Rapers also roam free because no one has no proof about there deeds.

      • AndroidDogHeatandSteelersFan

        Android phone came out in 2008.

    • Dominik Odobašić

      The same way you will deny how Android completely took over now and Apple is the one doing the copying.

      • Christopher

        Giving out crap for free does not mean they took over. LOL. What a kid.

      • Hwang Lee

        How do you sell something for free?

      • Christopher

        By signing a contract and paying to the carriers for service. Geez, kids these days.

      • Cyber Jethro

        Apple is flooding the market with free iPhone 4s’s.

      • Christopher

        Awwww nice try. LOL.
        You are 10 aren’t you?

      • Cyber Jethro

        I’m not ten, but I suspect from your logic that you might be nearing that age.

        Pro-Tip: Study hard.

      • Christopher

        Awwww trying to insult me.

        PRO-TIP:Jus’t don’t 😉

      • Dominik Odobašić

        Samsung sold 40 million GS4 units that cost $600+ each. Nothing free about that, kiddo.
        Enjoy using that Control Center.

      • Christopher

        When you talk about “took over” you don’t talk about GS4 or HTC 1 alone dumbass. You talk about all the free crap that the carriers have been giving out to public.

        If you talk about premium handsets androids stands 0 in front of APPLE.
        Take these stats up you a&** and go cry to your mama now. 😉

      • Dominik Odobašić

        Keep telling yourself that. Too bad you got no actual data to back it up, just mindless insults.
        And I was the one previously banned here. Disgusting.

      • Kurt

        Tr1pTr0p should have been banned long before. Surprised you lasted so long.

  • Grahaman27

    The student has become the master.

    • Christopher

      And yet again they will implement the scanner and say that it has been around for ages. Pathetic, shameless 😉

      • Cyber Jethro

        Motorola Atrix had a fingerprint scanner. (Sorry, I know that facts are shameless and pathetic)

      • Hwang Lee

        The only problem was that Android never really supported the fingerprint scanner.

      • Christopher

        What the hell is wrong with these mindless fagdroid zombies. Motorola had a shitty scanner and that is why it didn’t pan out. You dumb people just makes everyone look like an idiot. Now everyone will implement it like APPLE with your so called “facts” . One another fact “Shameless will always be shameless “