Looking to create some awesome ringtones? Then look no further than AudioExplorer+, a new jailbreak tweak, which scans all of the apps you have installed on your device in search of audio files. You can then use the audio files found, and import them into iTunes and use as ringtones.

After a few minutes of usage, I can firmly say that AudioExplorer+ is worth its $1.99 asking price, especially if you’re someone who likes to have custom ringtones. This means that any music contained with an app — whether it’s an email client with a particular jingle that you enjoy, or the music from your favorite game — can be used as a ringtone, or saved to your iTunes library. Check inside for a demonstration as to how it works.

When you first load up AudioExplorer+, you’ll be prompted to scan your entire app library for sound files. This scanning process can take a while, depending on how many apps you have installed on your device. I probably have 60 or 70 apps installed on my iPhone, and the scanning process took about 60 seconds.

Once your apps are scanned, they are organized in alphabetical order. Only apps that contain music files will be displayed. For instance, Find My iPhone doesn’t contain any audio to my knowledge, hence, the app isn’t displayed in the main list of apps.

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The nice thing about AudioExplorer+, is that once you scan your list of apps, it will list all of the audio files underneath that app, regardless of their directory structure. That means that you’ll simply have a list of all of the audio files contained in that app without having to browse this massive structure of directories. I’m assuming that the developer did this by means of alias links, as you can still display the full path of the audio file by tapping its disclosure triangle, selecting Open in > and then Path viewer.

Adding sound files to your iTunes library, or more importantly, your ringtone library, is as simple as simple can be. Just tap the blue triangle to the right of the sound you wish to add, tap Add to, and then tap iPod Library or Ringtones. Doing this will add the selected files to the queue, which can be accessed by tapping the Queue button at the bottom of the app. All of the items in the queue can be processed by tapping the Save button in the upper left-hand corner of the Queue page.

Once you’ve processed all of your audio files, you can head over to iTunes, or head over to Settings > Sounds > Ringtone to select the ringtone that you imported. I really can’t think of any easier way to extract music or sound effects from your favorite apps. AudioExplorer+ is a well designed app that works exactly like it promises with no limitations that I could find. If you’re at all into ringtones, then I highly recommend you give it a shot.

There is a free version of AudioExplorer that you can try out if you’re hesitant to shell out the cash. It’s just called AudioExplorer, and it’s slower than the + version, less responsive, and doesn’t have recursive searching after installing new apps. Still, it’s a good way to test out the jailbreak app to see if it’s indeed for you.

Head over to Cydia’s BigBoss repo where it can be downloaded today for $1.99. Be sure to share your thoughts and experiences in the comment section below.