ASBlur increases iOS 9 App Switcher privacy by blurring app previews

By Anthony Bouchard on May 3, 2016

You probably use the App Switcher a lot throughout your day-to-day iPhone usage. It’s an essential part of multitasking because it lets you easily get back to the apps you’ve used recently.

On the other hand, it also takes a screenshot of your last activity in the apps you closed recently, so it’s a privacy hazard because anyone can peek over your shoulder to see what you’ve done recently when you’re switching between recently-used apps.

ASBlur is a new free jailbreak tweak that helps solve this problem by blurring the contents of your App Switcher app previews. Read More

 

LogDog for iOS lets you monitor the security of your online accounts

By Anthony Bouchard on May 2, 2016

LogDog, a service originally made popular on the Android platform for keeping your various online accounts safe from unauthorized activity, is now launching for iOS.

With LogDog, you can actively monitor your online accounts and keep an eye on where the most recent logins came from, what operating system and web browser was used, and more.

If you’re always worried about your security, or even your privacy, this is an app you’ll want to check out. Read More

 

SilentMessenger enhances your Facebook & Facebook Messenger privacy

By Anthony Bouchard on Apr 24, 2016

Facebook and Facebook Messenger users who have a jailbroken iOS device are going to love the benefits of using a new jailbreak tweak called SilentMessenger.

This tweak is going to provide these users with additional steps to protect their privacy and keep their footprint in the Facebook apps as minimal as possible from the perspective of other users who are online. Moreover, it also supercharges some other features of the apps.

In this review, we’ll talk about what SilentMessenger can do for your Facebook experience, and walk you through all of the tweak’s options. Read More

 

How to remove location from your Instagram photos

By Sébastien Page on Apr 22, 2016

Instagram, like many other apps, lets you tag your photos with the location of where they were taken. It’s a neat feature that can leave a trail of your whereabouts, and can also be used in the photo map of your profile to have a visual representation of where all your photos have been taken.

But sometimes, having your location out there can raise privacy concerns. I personally recently realized that a large number of my Instagram photos were showing on my photo map as being sent from my house. Although I had never manually geotagged these photos, a bug (or maybe more accurately, an “oversight”) in the Instagram app had pinned all my uploaded photos to the location where I uploaded them from (mostly from my house). This bug has been fixed since August of 2015, but still, all photos uploaded until then showed up on my photo map, even though I had never geotagged them to begin with.

Long story short, I really got a scary moment when I realized that any stalker could easily figure out the location of my house just by looking at my photo map. This led me to remove a lot of photos from my photo map, and made me realize that I should probably share this tip and make sure you also do a privacy check of your Instagram uploads.

In this post, I will show you how to delete the location from individual photos you have previously geotagged. I will also show you how to remove location data from photos appearing in your photo map. Read More

 

Tip: increase your privacy by removing location from Diagnostic & Usage Data logs

By Christian Zibreg on Apr 18, 2016

Apple collects anonymous information about how you use your iPhone, iPad, iPod touch and other devices so that it can improve its products in future releases. End users can easily opt in and out of diagnostic collection in the Settings → Privacy → Diagnostics & Usage section.

I have this enabled to help Apple improve their products, but privacy-minded people might opt out of diagnostic collection on the grounds that the logs include their approximate location.

In this tutorial, we’ll explore increasing your privacy on iOS by having your location excluded from diagnostic data that iOS creates. Read More

 

Canadian police have had BlackBerry’s global decryption key since 2010

By Cody Lee on Apr 14, 2016

Canadian police have been in possession of a BlackBerry’s global decryption key since 2010, reports Vice. The site says recently released court documents reveal that the key was used in a criminal investigation to intercept over 1 million BBM messages.

The documents were made public after members of a Montreal crime syndicate pleaded guilty to their role in a 2011 murder, and they shine some light on the extent that BlackBerry, as well as telco giant Rogers, is willing to cooperate with investigators. Read More

 

Mobile forensics firm that unlocked terrorist’s iPhone 5c thinks it can hack iPhone 6

By Christian Zibreg on Apr 11, 2016

Mobile forensics firm Cellebrite that helped the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation bypass the passcode protection on the San Bernardino shooter’s iPhone 5c is adamant that it can also work around Apple’s security protections and hack into an iPhone 6, CNN reports.

Italian father Leonardo Fabbretti, who wanted to see the photos stored on his dead son Dama’s iPhone but was told by Apple that it was impossible to get into the device without a passcode, has now met with Cellebrite executives who have been working on accessing the files. Read More

 

FBI confirms a tool it bought to unlock terrorist’s iPhone 5c does not work on iPhone 5s and newer

By Christian Zibreg on Apr 7, 2016

James Comey, Director of the Federal Bureau of iPhones—that is, Investigation—confirmed in an interview with CNN yesterday that a tool that the agency had purchased from a third-party to unlock San Bernardino shooter Syed Farook’s iPhone 5c cannot be used to bypass security protections on newer models, from the iPhone 5s onward.

This implies the tool relies on the fact that the iPhone 5c and earlier models lack hardware features like the Secure Enclave embedded in Apple’s mobile processors (from the iPhone 5s’s A7 chip and onward) which keeps encrypted sensitive information and stuff like the number of passcode attempts isolated from the rest of the system. Read More

 

DOJ unlocks San Bernardino shooter’s iPhone, withdraws case against Apple

By Cody Lee on Mar 28, 2016

The Department of Justice filed a request on Monday, asking the court to vacate its order to compel Apple to assist agents in unlocking an iPhone. As expected, the FBI was able to crack the handset without the company’s assistance.

The filing comes a week after the DOJ asked the court to postpone its hearing with Apple, claiming it had found a possible method for accessing the data stored on an iPhone 5c, which belonged to San Bernardino shooter Syed Farook. Read More

 

The ultimate guide to protecting your private information in Notes from the prying eyes

By Christian Zibreg on Mar 24, 2016

According to Apple, Notes is one of the most popular and most-frequently used stock applications on the iPhone, iPod touch and iPad.

People use Notes for everything from memorizing recipes to keeping track of errands, creating shopping lists, storing inspirational quotes and even passwords, codes and medical data.

Not all notes contain sensitive information, but many do. Beginning with iOS 9.3 and OS X El Capitan 10.11.4, you can protect your notes with a password or Touch ID.

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to set up Notes protection, secure items on a note-by-note basis so no one can view their contents and more. Read More

 

Apple has 6 cloud infrastructure projects to prevent unauthorized snooping

By Christian Zibreg on Mar 23, 2016

Amid reports that it’s shifting some of the iCloud services to Google’s Cloud Platform, The Information is reporting that Apple has a total of six projects underway related to boosting its cloud infrastructure. One of them, code-named Project McQueen, calls for custom data storage systems.

Apple suspects that third-party servers that power iCloud might have been intercepted during shipping and that someone may have added additional chips and firmware to them “in order to make them vulnerable to infiltration,” as per the report. Read More

 

iOS 9.3 patches a bug that would let attackers decrypt photos and videos sent via iMessage

By Christian Zibreg on Mar 21, 2016

A group of Johns Hopkins University researchers led by computer science professor Matthew D. Green has discovered a critical bug in Apple’s stock Messages app for the iPhone, iPod touch and iPad.

The vulnerability would allow nefarious users to decrypt photos and videos sent over iMessage, but there’s nothing to worry about—iOS 9.3, which we expect to release after today’s Apple event wraps up, contains a patch for this oversight on Apple’s part. Read More

 

WSJ: Apple working to strengthen iCloud encryption without inconveniencing users

By Christian Zibreg on Mar 16, 2016

In the wake of the high-stake fight between Apple and the United States government over encryption and the right to create products with nearly unbreakable security measures, Apple is now working hard to make it impossible for law enforcement to gain access to data inside device backups on iCloud.

As reported today by The Wall Street Journal, Apple executives are “wrestling with how to strengthen iCloud encryption without inconveniencing users.” Read More

 

DOJ threatened to seize iOS source code unless Apple complies with court order in FBI case

By Christian Zibreg on Mar 14, 2016

The United States Department of Justice (DoJ) has slid a disturbing footnote in its court filing against Apple that could be interpreted as a threat to seize the iOS source code unless Apple complies with a court order in the FBI case.

The DoJ is demanding that Apple create a special version of iOS with removed security features that would permit the FBI to run brute-force passcode attempts on the San Bernardino shooter’s iPhone 5c.

Meanwhile, President Barack Obama has made public where he stands on the Apple vs. FBI case, which has quickly become a heated national debate. Read More

 

How to check Activation Lock status of your iPhone or iPad

By Christian Zibreg on Mar 14, 2016

If you haven’t already, do yourself a favor and start using Activation Lock, an indispensable security feature that prevents anyone from activating your iPhone, iPod touch or iPad without having access to your Apple ID or password.

Activation Lock also puts the burden on you to ensure that the device you’re buying is erased and no longer linked to the previous owner’s account. In this tutorial, you will learn how to quickly check the current Activation Lock status of any iOS device using Apple’s web tool. Read More

 

Outlook for iOS adds Touch ID protection for your emails, contacts and calendars

By Christian Zibreg on Mar 14, 2016

After adding 3D Touch support for quickly viewing your calendar or composing a new event or email directly from the Home screen, Microsoft’s mobile Outlook app for iPhone, iPod touch and iPad has gained the ability to protect your emails, contacts and calendars within the app with your fingerprint, using Touch ID on supported iPhones and iPads. In addition, the Outlook 2.2.2 update packs in a few other refinements and enhancements. Read More

 

Apple-FBI fight over iPhone backdoor, security and encryption gets a comedic treatment

By Christian Zibreg on Mar 14, 2016

Apple’s fight against the United States government and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) over circumventing encryption and creating a backdoor into the iPhone has received a comedic treatment in a segment on the Last Week Tonight show by comedian Jon Oliver.

In a mock Apple ad, Oliver rehashes controversial quotes from government officials, as well as Donald Trump’s iPhone boycott idea and District Attorney Daniel Conley’s Kennedy quote of sending a man to the moon. Read More

 

Eddy Cue: what if FBI forces Apple to spy on users via iPhone’s camera or microphone?

By Christian Zibreg on Mar 10, 2016

Not a day goes by without one of Apple’s executives reaffirming the company’s position on encryption. In a new Spanish-language interview with Univision, Eddy Cue, Apple’s Senior Vice President of Internet Software and Services, made the case against the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) gaining additional surveillance powers.

Were the government to force Apple to create a version of iOS with decreased security, nothing would prevent it from seeking other concessions, Cue said.

“For example, one day the FBI may want us to open your phone’s camera, microphone,” he cautioned. “Those are things we can’t do now. But if they can force us to do that, I think that’s very bad.” Read More

 

Video: Steve Wozniak sides with Apple in FBI fight

By Christian Zibreg on Mar 8, 2016

As a strong proponent of privacy and human rights, it is now wonder that Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak would stand firmly with Apple in its fight against the FBI and the United States government regarding creating a backdoor into the San Bernardino shooter’s iPhone.

Appearing on the Conan show last night, the Woz said the FBI “picked the lamest case you ever could”. It’s “worthless” to expect something’s on the shooter’s iPhone 5c that the FBI wants to break into because Verizon had already turned over all the phone records and SMS messages and law enforcement got iCloud backups form Apple. Read More

 

Apple’s Craig Federighi: creating iPhone backdoor would be ‘a serious mistake’

By Christian Zibreg on Mar 7, 2016

Craig Federighi, Apple’s Senior Vice President of Software Engineering who oversees the development of iOS, OS X and Apple’s common operating system engineering team, has written an op-ed piece in The Washington Post in which he reiterates Apple’s position that the FBI’s demand that Apple create a version of iOS with decreased security would be “a serious mistake,” saying the FBI wants to “turn back the clock to a less-secure time”. Read More

 
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