Apple A7 chip (Secure Enclave 001)

Last week, Qualcomm’s CMO Anand Chandrasekher made headlines for comments he made during an interview regarding Apple’s new A7 processor. He called the chip a ‘marketing gimmick,’ and said 64-bit holds no real benefit for users.

But pundits were quick to challenge Chandrasekher, pointing to apps and games with A7 support as proof that the 64-bit architecture holds value. And Qualcomm must agree, because it has issued a statement backtracking on the claims…

TechHive has the scoop:

“The comments made by Anand Chandrasekher, Qualcomm CMO, about 64-bit computing were inaccurate,” said a Qualcomm spokesperson in an email. “The mobile hardware and software ecosystem is already moving in the direction of 64-bit; and, the evolution to 64-bit brings desktop class capabilities and user experiences to mobile, as well as enabling mobile processors and software to run new classes of computing devices.”

Qualcomm did not provide further comment.”

And for reference, here’s Chandrasekher from last week:

“I know there’s a lot of noise because Apple did [64-bit] on their A7,” said Anand Chandrasekher, senior vice president and chief marketing officer at Qualcomm, in an interview. “I think they are doing a marketing gimmick. There’s zero benefit a consumer gets from that.”

It’s not surprising that Qualcomm is pulling back here. Not only is this a PR move—removing the company’s name from a controversial subject—but the company also has a close relationship with Apple, as it makes iPhone and iPad modems.

A7 Chip

And despite Chandrasekher comments, Qualcomm itself is working on a 64-bit processor, which Android smartphones are expected to start utilizing in 2014. So this is definitely where the market is headed, it’s just that Apple got there early.