How to quickly toggle dark mode using a keyboard shortcut on Mac

By Jeff Benjamin on Feb 27, 2015

Dark mode is one of the more popular features of OS X Yosemite, because it allows you to add a dark tint to both the dock and the menu bar on Mac. The standard way to enable dark mode involves venturing to System Preferences, opening the General section, and clicking on the enable dark mode option. But wouldn’t it be cool if you could toggle dark mode using a simple keyboard shortcut?

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MTerminal is a great replacement for Mobile Terminal

By Jeff Benjamin on Feb 16, 2015

Since the realization that jailbroken devices can be permanently bricked, it’s a good opportunity to remind you to change your iPhone’s root password. Using a terminal emulator makes changing the password a piece of cake. Unfortunately, the most popular terminal emulator hasn’t been updated for iOS 8 or for newer devices like the iPhone 6.

Thankfully, there is a free alternative terminal emulator available in Cydia, and it’s actually a fork of Mobile Terminal. Entitled MTerminal, this lightweight Mobile Terminal alternative comes from developer lordscotland, and features iOS 8 support with optimization for big screen devices. Read More

 

How to enable key repeats on your Mac

By Timothy Reavis on Jan 14, 2015

One thing I’ve always liked about Macs is their secondary keys, where holding down a letter key will display variations of that letter, like holding down “u” to get “ü.” This comes in handy when spelling non-English words, but if that’s not something you ever do, Apple’s substitution of special characters for the traditional key repeats of Windows computers can be an unneeded – and perhaps unwanted – feature.

The good news is that there’s a simple way to take control and change the behavior of long key presses to accommodate your needs. This not only works with letters, but number keys as well. Read More

 

How to enable text selection in OS X’s Quick Look

By Timothy Reavis on Jan 7, 2015

Anyone who has used a Mac for more than a minuscule amount of time has more than likely come across Quick Look, the pop-up window that is invoked with a press of the space bar when a file or folder is highlighted on the desktop or in Finder. Quick Look’s usefulness becomes evident when file names aren’t descriptive enough by allowing users to view the contents of many different types of files without having to open them in a full-fledged application like Pages for documents or Preview for images.

By default Quick Look can only display a static view of a file that only grants users a peek at the contents without any real function. Imagine, however, being able to copy a document’s text without having to open it in TextEdit or Pages. This is incredibly useful in a variety of situations, from dealing with templates to Word documents to code snippets, where having multiple applications and documents opened shouldn’t be necessary for copying from one location and pasting to another. The good news is that this functionality is completely possible and perfectly easy to enable. Read More

 

Apple readying a fix for Bash vulnerability, ‘vast majority’ of Mac users unaffected

By Christian Zibreg on Sep 26, 2014

A fix for a new kind of exploit recently discovered in the Bash command shell used in multiple versions of Unix is underway, Apple confirmed Friday, adding that the “vast majority” of Mac users are unaffected because OS X is “safe by default” from the so-called ‘Shell Shock’ attacks.

“The vast majority of OS X users are not at risk to recently reported Bash vulnerabilities,” an Apple spokesperson said in a statement quoted by The Verge.

The vulnerability was documented and publicized Thursday by security researchers at RedHat and gained prominences after security expert Robert Graham called it “as big as the Heartbleed bug,” referring to a nasty vulnerability discovered earlier in the year in the OpenSSL software commonly used by nearly two-thirds of servers powering the Internet. Read More

 

New Unix command line exploit makes Macs vulnerable to attacks

By Christian Zibreg on Sep 25, 2014

A new exploit in the Bash command shell found in many versions of Unix, including Apple’s OS X desktop operating system, makes Mac computers vulnerable to so-called ‘Shell Shock’ attacks, security researchers at RedHat discovered Thursday.

Though the exploit lets attackers run malicious scripts remotely, most people are not at risk unless they’ve manually allowed SSH access from remote connections or a web server running server side scripting.

Here’s how you can check if you’re vulnerable and what you can do in order to avoid ‘Shell Shock’ attacks on your system. Read More

 

How to show hidden files and folders in Finder on Mac

By Sébastien Page on Aug 4, 2014

Some people like to know everything that is on their computer. Admittedly, I was one of these people many moons ago, when I was a Windows user. I would always make sure that Windows Explorer would show all hidden files and folders. I’m not sure why, but I liked it this way.

These days, I’m quite the opposite, as I like to see as little files and folders as possible on my Mac. But I understand some people out there have the desire to see all those files and folders, for whatever reason that may be.

In this post I will show you how to show hidden files and folders in Finder on your MacRead More

 

How to run a terminal session via Notification Center

By Jeff Benjamin on Jul 23, 2013

It’s neat to see the terminal get lots of love from the jailbreak community this week. We just got the new MobileTerm Backgrounder tweak, and now we have another new tweak related to the terminal — NCTerminal. As you have probably figured out by now, NCTerminal allows you to run a terminal session directly in Notification Center. That being said, I will say that the tweak is a bit on the peculiar side, as you’ll see in my full video walkthrough. Read More

 

How to background the Mobile Terminal app

By Jeff Benjamin on Jul 23, 2013

MobileTerm Backgrounder is a brand new jailbreak tweak that allows you to maintain a persistent connection to the Mobile Terminal app. If you’ve used Mobile Terminal in the past, then you know how frustrating it can be to close out of the app, return, and all of your previous data disappears. MobileTerm Backgrounder is a tweak that works with the jailbroken Mobile Terminal app, and it makes it much easier to continue where you left off when switching between apps. Have a look at our video walkthrough inside to see its ins and outs. Read More

 

How to manually fix the Weather app issue after jailbreaking with evasi0n

By Mike Schnier on Feb 5, 2013

As you may be aware, the initial release of the evasi0n untethered jailbreak broke a few minor features in iOS 6, most visibly the native Weather app on the iPhone and iPod touch. Word from the developers is evasi0n’s exploit corrupted an important plist settings file for System apps like Weather, Siri, and the App Store. Lucky for our tech savvy readers, there’s an easy fix that can replace the broken plist file in minutes. The script we are working with come from pod2g himself… Read More

 

How to extract OS X download history via Terminal

By Jeff Benjamin on Jan 14, 2013

Have you ever wanted to go back and check your Mac’s entire download history in one fell swoop? With this handy Terminal command your download history is only a few steps away.

One of our readers tipped this to me via Twitter. It’s essentially an SQL command that you run via Terminal. It goes into the database and extracts the full contents of your download history logs as found in the LSQuarantineEvent. It doesn’t matter where, or how you downloaded these files, in most cases the download should be logged.

One exception that I’ve noted is with Mac App Store apps. Items downloaded from the Mac App Store are not logged here. Take a look at our video inside for a glance into how it works… Read More