Ireland is cheering in favor of Apple in EU state aid tax ruling

By Christian Zibreg on Nov 10, 2016

In August, the European Commission slammed Apple with a tax bill from hell over a sweetheart deal it received from Ireland—which, in the Commission’s view, constitutes “illegal state aid”.

Dublin promptly promised to join Apple’s fight against EU and it’s put its money where its mouth is.

Michael Noonan, Finance Minister in the Irish government, said that Dublin today challenged the EU judgment by submitting an appeal to the European courts in a bid to block the decision, ArsTechnica reports. Read More

 

The government of Ireland will back Apple in its fight against EU’s tax bill from hell

By Christian Zibreg on Sep 2, 2016

Following news earlier this week that the European Commission had ruled that Apple must pay €13 billion ($14.5 billion) in back taxes to the government of Ireland because its sweetheart deal with Dublin that lets it be subjected to a lower tax rate constitutes “illegal state aid,” the Irish government said today it would join Apple in its fight against the ruling.

“Paradoxically, Ireland is determined not to accept the tax windfall, which would be equivalent to what it spent last year on funding its struggling health service,” says the report. Read More

 

Here’s Tim Cook’s message to Apple community regarding massive Irish tax bill

By Christian Zibreg on Aug 30, 2016

The European Commission has ruled that Apple is on the hook for €13 billion ($14.5 billion) in back taxes as its “sweetheart deal” to pay a lower tax rate in Ireland has been characterized as “illegal state aid”.

Apple is going to appeal the ruling and now CEO Tim Cook has penned an open letter, entitled “A Message to the Apple Community in Europe,” in which he explains Apple’s position in this case, writing he is “confident” that the huge tax bill will be reversed. Read More

 

EU orders Apple to pay $14.5 billion in back taxes

By Christian Zibreg on Aug 30, 2016

At a press conference Tuesday, the European Commission’s competition commissioner Margarethe Vestager announced that the European Union has ordered the government of Ireland to collect up to €13 billion, or about $14.5 billion, in back taxes from Apple. The sum represents Europe’s largest tax penalty and a significant increase over the 1 billion figure floated around ahead of the ruling.

Apple will appeal the decision. Read More

 

European Commission to reportedly rule against Apple’s sweetheart tax deal with Ireland

By Christian Zibreg on Aug 29, 2016

According to a 130-page judgment seen by The Financial Times, the European Commission (EC) is set to rule Tuesday against Apple’s sweetheart tax deal it struck with the government of Ireland back in 1999.

The Commission is reportedly set to demand that Ireland recoup over 1 billion euros in back taxes from the iPhone maker, or circa $1.12 billion.

“Apple will on Tuesday be hit with Europe’s largest tax penalty after Brussels ruled that the company received illegal state aid from Ireland,” warns the financial newspaper. Read More

 

Tim Cook says Apple tax avoidance talk is ‘total political crap’

By Cody Lee on Dec 18, 2015

60 Minutes on Friday shared a one minute clip from its upcoming interview with Apple CEO Tim Cook. In the preview, Charlie Rose asks for Cook’s thoughts regarding Apple’s congressional tax hearing, which found the company to be engaged in a “sophisticated scheme” to avoid taxes on its $74 billion held overseas.

“That is total political crap,” Cook says. “There is no truth behind it. Apple pays every tax dollar we owe.” He explains that Apple does a lot of business overseas, which is why a lot of its revenues are overseas, and although the company would like to bring that cash back to the United States, it would cost 40% to do so. Read More

 

How to get a tax break on Apple products

By Christian Zibreg on Jul 30, 2014

Apple is reminding customers of the upcoming sales tax free days in the United States. Specifically, as part of the back-to-school sales tax holidays, the company is reminding would-be shoppers of a not-to-be-missed opportunity to buy select Macs, iOS devices, accessories, educational software and services at a significant discount.

The Online Apple Store is now advertising a tax break on Macs and iOS devices purchased both at its brick-and-mortar outlets and online.

Even better, tax-free purchases can be combined with Apple’s own 2014 Back To School promotion to net yourself up to $100 in Apple Store gift cards for Macs, iPhones and iPads… Read More

 

Tim Cook visits Irish government to talk tax evasion

By Christian Zibreg on Jan 31, 2014

Apple CEO Tim Cook flew to Ireland today to meet with the country’s government officials and tour the company’s corporate office. Although the meeting agenda was shrouded in secrecy, media reported Cook and the head of government discussed tax loopholes and a change in the Irish laws that should prevent firms like Apple and Google to avoid declaring tax residency in either the U.S. or Ireland.

A loophole in Ireland’s corporate tax laws has enabled many of the world’s top corporations to operate as virtually stateless firms, ungoverned by any nation’s taxing authority… Read More

 

Apple being investigated for $1.3 billion Italian tax fraud

By Cody Lee on Nov 13, 2013

Apple is in hot water over international taxes again, this time it’s in Italy. According to Reuters, the Cupertino company is currently under investigation by Italian authorities for alleged tax fraud.

The Italian government believes Apple may have hidden more than 1 billion euros (or $1.3 billion US) from the country’s tax authority during 2010 and 2011, and Milan prosecutors want answers… Read More

 

Ireland to alter tax laws in wake of Apple uproar

By Ed Sutherland on Oct 16, 2013

Ireland’s Finance Minister announced plans to close a loop-hole in the country’s corporate tax laws, eliminating the ability for companies such as Apple to operate as virtually ‘stateless’ firms ungoverned by any nation’s taxing authority. The change in the Irish laws means the iPhone maker cannot avoid declaring tax residency in either the U.S. or Ireland.

Earlier this year, Apple’s ability to funnel payments through a unit in Ireland to avoid paying taxes brought U.S. scrutiny by the Senate and testimony by Apple CEO Tim Cook… Read More

 
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