Netflix offline viewing coming before year-end?

It looks like Netflix offline viewing might finally be coming even though CEO Reed Hastings first said that the feature was “never going to happen”.

As Streaming Observers learned a few days ago, the company has changed its mind and will be reportedly adding offline mode to its mobile application before the end of this year.

Netflix’s share prices shot up 20 percent this morning after the company reported better than expected third-quarter earnings.

Tip: quickly measure your Netflix streaming speed with this iPhone app

Netflix yesterday announced a brand new iPhone app on the App Store which it designed to let you quickly measure how fast your broadband downlink is by testing the connection to Netflix’s servers. The goal of the free app, aptly named Fast, is to give Netflix subscribers a better understanding of the streaming quality they can expect from the service on their Internet connection. It’s not a replacement for SpeedTest or similar software and does not measure the uplink speed because it has little effect on streaming quality.

Eddy Cue: Apple is a delivery platform, not a Netflix rival (plus, skinny bundle “is a misconception”)

Eddy Cue, 52, Apple’s Senior Vice President of Internet Software and Services, sat down for an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, answering a series of questions related to Apple’s alleged attempts to introduce a skinny bundle of television programming on iTunes, its relationship with content owners and swirling rumors that it may be invested in creating original programming to become the next Netflix or Comcast.

Offline viewing on Netflix to launch by year-end?

Video-streaming company Netflix seems to be secretly developing a feature that would permit subscribers to download specific television shows and movies for viewing without an Internet connection, industry insider and Penthera COO Dan Taitz told LightReading. Offline viewing on Netflix should launch before the end of this year. A Netflix spokesperson denied comment on the report.

Netflix app now supports Picture in Picture on compatible iPads

Netflix on Tuesday pushed out an update for its iOS app, brining the client to version 8.7. It’s a minor release, with just a few items mentioned in the change log, but there’s one significant new feature that’s going to really please iPad fans: Picture in Picture support.

That’s right, folks with a compatible iPad can now watch Netflix in a floating, resizable window while continuing to perform tasks like checking email or browsing Safari. Netflix says you’ll have to be on iOS 9.3.2 or later, and of course you’ll need an iPad Air or later.

Tip: measure your Internet download speed with Netflix’s new minimal tool

Netflix just rolled out a nicely done, simple-to-use way for consumers to estimate what speed their Internet service provider is providing.

Though not a network engineer’s analysis and diagnostic suite, the web-based application is minimal, fast and ad-free, unlike Ookla’s ubiquitous website and the associated mobile app.

Here’s how you can quickly measure your download speed with Netflix’s new tool.

How to turn off Netflix’s autoplay feature

Not everyone is a fan of bing watching. I, for one, rarely watch a dozen episodes of Friends in a row. If you’re anything like me, Netflix’s autoplay feature is probably something of an annoyance to you.

It’s especially worrisome if Netflix uses cellular data: forgetting to stop the playback after you’ve just finished watching an episode won’t stop Netflix from playing the next one automatically, resulting in unwanted data charges.

iDownloadBlog’s tutorial series is here to help you with that: in this quick how-to, we’ll show you how to turn off the video autoplay feature across all your Netflix devices—they’re calling it Post-Play—with just a few clicks.

Netflix picks up 3D Touch Home screen shortcuts, cellular video quality presets and more

Netflix today updated its iPhone, iPod touch and iPad application on the App Store with support for Quick Actions on the Home screen with 3D Touch.

This lets iPhone 6s or iPhone 6s Plus owners press the Netflix icon on their Home screen to quickly search, continue watching and access the Trending Now or My List sections from the shortcuts menu.

Other enhancements in this edition of Netflix for iOS include VoiceOver navigation improvements and new controls to manage streaming data usage on cellular networks.

Netflix begins rolling out (very limited) support for HDR and Dolby Vision streaming

Netflix isn’t wasting any time: they began rolling out support for high-dynamic range (HDR) streaming, with a spokesperson confirming that HDR programming will be delivered to compatible TVs anywhere Netflix is available.

“We are indeed live with HDR,” Yann Lafargue, Netflix’s manager of corporate communications said to FlatpanelsHD.

The new streaming option works with compatible TVs, both in HDR10 and Dolby Vision, resulting in fewer compression artifacts and a greater dynamic range of luminosity than is possible with standard streaming technologies.

Netflix app updated with support for 3D Touch, iPad Pro and more

Netflix on Wednesday pushed out an update for its iOS client, bringing the app to version 8.0. The release is significant in that it features a number of improvements, including a better Kids experience on iPad and new Post-Play experience on iPhone.

Version 8.0 also features native support for Apple’s just released iPad Pro, meaning the layout has been optimized for the tablet’s 12.9-inch screen to show more content per screen, as well as support for 3D Touch actions like Peek and Pop within the app.

U.S. Netflix customers on grandfathered plans will get slapped with a price increase

Did you sign up for Netflix’s $7.99 per month plan with high-definition streaming before new pricing tiers were unveiled?

If so, the company will reward your loyalty by slapping you with a price increase later this year, according to Netflix’s letter to shareholders issued yesterday as part of the company’s quarterly earnings release.

Grandfathered Netflix customers in the United States will have two choices: continue using their $7.99 per month plan, but only in standard definition, or choose to pay $9.99 per month to continue watching in high definition.