Multitouch

Three finger drag gesture via new MacBook Pro’s trackpad acting up for some users

Three finger drag, a productivity-boosting multi-touch trackpad gesture in macOS, isn’t working properly for some owners of Apple’s new MacBook Pro. Both 13 and 15-inch MacBook Pros have larger trackpads than their predecessors, but for many people the gesture doesn’t work at all.

For others, three finger drag works only intermittently or performs erroneously when used in one of the sides of the new MacBook Pro’s Force Touch trackpad.

Apple launches worldwide “Touch Disease” repair program for iPhone 6 Plus

Apple has finally acknowledged existence of so-called “Touch Disease” following a class action lawsuit regarding the issue. The problem has been plaguing a subset of iPhone 6 Plus owners for quite some time now, manifesting itself in the form of a flickering bar at the top of the display and general multi-touch unresponsiveness.

The firm denied responsibility because under the terms of a new worldwide program it’s agreed to fix any affected iPhone 6 Plus devices, but for a $149 service fee.

How to disable natural scrolling on your Mac’s multitouch trackpad

All of Apple’s MacBooks come equipped with a multitouch trackpad that recognizes a two-finger scroll up/down gesture. Apple’s iMac, Mac Pro, and Mac Mini can also be paired with any generation of Apple’s Bluetooth Magic Trackpad or Magic Mouse to provide a similar multi-touch experience.

You probably use this gesture a lot throughout macOS while you’re browsing websites or writing up long documents since clicking and dragging is so 1990’s and tap/multi-touch gestures are more commonly used on modern multitouch trackpads.

If you’re an ex-Windows user, or still use Windows, then you’re probably used to the content on the page scrolling in the same direction as your fingers move on the trackpad, but on the Mac it’s quite the opposite by default. Fortunately, it’s easy to change the scroll direction of your trackpad, and in this tutorial, we’re going to show you how it’s done.

Apple patents technology that would allow iPhones to detect touches while wearing gloves

Did you know that your iPhone’s multi-touch display cannot detect touches while you’re wearing gloves? That’s because the iPhone uses capacitive touchscreen technology that takes human body capacitance as input and gloves block your fingers from touching the screen directly.

A new patent application Apple filed for with the United States Patent & Trademark Office (USPTO) in the summer of 2014 was published this morning.

Titled “Glove Touch Detection”, it seeks to fix this problem via dynamically adjusted threshold values, which would permit the touchscreen to register touch events while the user is wearing regular gloves.

iOS 9 introduces predictive touch technology that should be crucial for rumored Apple stylus

Coincidentally or not, iOS 9 has introduced a trio of notable enhancements in the multi-touch department that could be viewed as laying the groundwork for a rumored Apple-branded stylus thought to arrive later this year alongside a larger twelve-something-inch ‘iPad Pro’ model.

As one of the WWDC 2015 session videos details, the Cocoa Touch framework in iOS 9 has gained brand new predictive touch capabilities. Not only that, but iOS 9 now has a drawing engine and features vastly improved multi-touch performance, a significant boon for apps that let you draw with your finger or a stylus.

Apple researching hover touch sensing and embedded heart rate monitoring

A pair of patent applications filed with the United States Patent & Trademark Office earlier in the week have hinted that Apple’s iPhone could gain a new sensor letting the smartphone detect your cardiac signal when it’s picked up. The invention would permit your iPhone to identify you by your heartbeat.

Furthermore, the company appears to be researching hover sensing technology like that found on Samsung’s Galaxy S4, which is capable of detecting touch events even when a user’s finger is not really in contact with the touchscreen…

Apple working on multitouch gestures for iOS keyboard, patent hints

Although Apple’s iOS is known for its gesture-based interface, the iPhone maker is notoriously hesitant about enhancing the virtual keyboard feature. A patent granted Tuesday reveals the company has been considering adopting multitouch keyboard from the moment the iPhone appeared. The patent filing entitled ‘Swipe gestures for touch screen keyboards’ outlines gestures to handle common keyboard tasks, such as deletion, punctuation and more…

Apple updates touch tech in upcoming iPads

DigiTimes in January wrote Apple’s fifth-generation iPad could adopt the iPad mini’s thin-film touchscreen technology called GF Ditto, also better known as GF2. NPD DisplaySearch is well-versed in all things concerning mobile screens and yesterday they corroborated the rumor.

Specifically, DisplaySearch notes Apple’s shift toward in-cell display tech for the iPhone 5 and GF2 for the upcoming iPads has resulted in major shifts in the touch-panel industry supply chain. Basically a double-sided ITO film, GF2 has allowed Apple to make the iPad mini much thinner and significantly lighter compared to the bulkier G/G touchscreen tech driving the iPad 3.

As the iPad 5 is widely expected to adopt the iPad mini’s thin and light appearance, obviously a major part of that will be Apple’s adoption of the advanced GF2 technology…

New Apple patents granted, covering multitouch, iPhone 5 and Lightning

Among the nearly 40 Apple patents granted today by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) are ones covering multi-touch technology, as well as designs for the iPhone 5 and the Lightning connector. The widest-ranging group of patents involves the multi-touch technology for the iPhone 5 and latest iPads and iPods.

Meanwhile, Apple’s Senior Vice President of Design, Jonathan Ive, is given lead credit for designing the iPhone 5…

The online Apple Store, now with iOS touch-friendly navigation

Apple’s online store has over time implemented a bunch of tweaks aimed at improving navigation and browsing product pages on Apple’s mobile devices like the iPhone and iPad.

For instance, I’ve always liked the ability to swipe through teaser images on landing pages for specific products.

Here’s an example: fire up Safari on your iPhone or iPad, visit www.apple.com/iphone and swipe through those big, beautiful product shots at the top. But the company isn’t stopping there.

Having recently hired dozens of engineers, visual designers and web developers, Apple has now introduced a fresh set of tweaks to the online Apple Store, including the touch-friendly navigation bar which appears right below the main product sections (iPod, iPad etc.)…