University of Wisconsin takes Apple to court over A7’s performance-enhancing tricks

By Christian Zibreg on Feb 3, 2014

The University of Wisconsin via its patent-licensing arm, the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, has filed a lawsuit against Apple alleging the company’s in-house designed A7 chip infringes the foundation’s patent designed to improve “the efficiency and performance of contemporary computer processors” by introducing a new process for allowing quicker execution of processor instructions.

It’s been reported Monday that Apple’s 64-bit A7 chip, which acts as the primary engine driving the iPhone 5s, the iPad Air and the iPad mini with Retina display, apparently uses this technology without permission… Read More

 

Apple slapped with new $840 million claim for ebooks price fixing

By Cody Lee on Feb 2, 2014

Apple was found guilty of conspiring with 5 major publishers to increase the prices of e-books last summer, but so far it hasn’t had to write a single check. But that could change soon thanks to a newly-filed damages claim.

Steve Berman, an attorney representing consumers and 33 states who linked up with the DOJ’s case against Apple, says the company’s actions caused e-book buyers to spend an extra $280,254,374. And wants that tripled… Read More

 

Cable companies sue Apple’s ‘Rockstar Consortium’ over patent conspiracy

By Cody Lee on Jan 22, 2014

Three years ago a consortium consisting of Apple, Microsoft, BlackBerry and several other tech giants purchased thousands of patents from communications expert Nortel. They have since tried using the patents to sue a number of other companies, with little success.

Well this week the group, aptly-named the Rockstar Consortium, got a taste of its own medicine. Five US cable companies, including Charter Communications and others, filed a lawsuit against the shell corporation for engaging in what it calls an illegal patent conspiracy… Read More

 

New class action suit claims Apple sells customer info

By Cody Lee on Jan 17, 2014

Three men from Massachusetts filed a lawsuit against Apple this week. Adam Christensen, Jeffrey Scolnick and William Farrell claim that they were unlawfully forced to enter their zip code while making purchases at the company’s New England retail stores.

The suit contents that this practice is illegal under the Massachusetts Unfair Trade Practices Act, which says you can’t compel customers to provide identifiable information. And the men say that Apple isn’t just collecting info, it’s also selling it to third parties… Read More

 

Judge approves anti-poaching agreement suit against Apple, Google and others

By Christian Zibreg on Jan 15, 2014

A few years ago, if you were a Silicon Valley engineer in high demand, landing a job at Apple, Google, Intel or other technology titans likely meant your career was stalling as a result of these companies conspiring to fix wages by not hiring each others’ employees. A probe by the Justice Department into these ‘no solicitation’ agreements led to a class-action lawsuit.

And after a federal appeals court refused to let the defendants appeal a class certification order, the affected Silicon Valley software and hardware engineers, programmers, animators, digital artists, web developers and other technical professionals have won clearance to pursue the collusion case as group, Reuters reported Wednesday… Read More

 

Apple agrees to refund users in FTC settlement over unwanted in-app purchases

By Christian Zibreg on Jan 15, 2014

Parents whose kids were tricked into obtaining virtual items in iPhone and iPad games by way of the iOS In-App Purchase mechanism will get refunded over unwanted spending, according to Apple’s settlement with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC). The penalty dwarfs Google’s $22.5 million fine in the Safari website tracking scandal.

Apple CEO Tim Cook was not pleased with the outcome, but acknowledged in a letter to employees that the company “has entered into a consent decree” over long-standing complaints over inappropriate charges in the App Store, alluding his company may have exhausted its legal options and didn’t want to risk an enduring legal battle with the government… Read More

 

VirnetX files motion to add Apple’s newest products to latest infringement suit

By Cody Lee on Jan 14, 2014

VirnetX announced today that it will attempt to add Apple’s most recent slate of products—including the iPhone 5s and iPad Air—to its ongoing patent infringement suit against the company. It filed the motion this morning in the US District Court for the Eastern District of Texas.

For those unfamiliar with VirnetX, it’s a well-known patent holding firm that won in upwards of $400 million in damages from Apple in a case involving the FaceTime feature last year. Apple has since changed the feature to avoid further infringement, but apparently not enough… Read More

 

The Apple-Nokia patent deal is expiring December 31, 2016

By Christian Zibreg on Jan 13, 2014

You may remember that back in June 2011 Apple lost a patent infringement case that the Finnish handset maker Nokia had filed against the Cupertino company, resulting in an undisclosed one-time payment and ongoing royalties to Nokia for use of their patents. The Nokia CEO Stephen Elop was “very pleased” to have Apple join Nokia licensees.

However, the essentials of the contract have for the most part remained confidential. Today, we get to learn more about the terms of the deal as Samsung told a U.S. court that the patent pact is expiring on December 31, 2016… Read More

 

US appeals court: Apple did not violate Google’s Motorola push notifications patent

By Christian Zibreg on Jan 10, 2014

The United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit said on Friday that Apple does not use patented technology owned by Google unit Motorola Mobility in making its iPhones. This means Apple is off the hook in regard to Motorola’s assertion of patent infringement.

The appeal court’s ruling upheld a decision by the International Trade Commission in April, which also concluded that the iPhone didn’t violate Google’s patents… Read More

 

Apple, Samsung CEOs agree to mediation ahead of patent trial

By Cody Lee on Jan 8, 2014

According to new paperwork filed earlier this afternoon, Apple and Samsung have agreed to attend a mediation session next month ahead of their second major US patent trial, which is slated to begin on March 31.

The meeting is to take place on or before February 19, and is to be attended by Tim Cook, Samsung’s Oh-Hyun Kwon and their respective in-house lawyers. And they will attempt to discuss settlement opportunities…

Read More

 

BlackBerry going after Ryan Seacrest’s ‘Typo’ keyboard for patent infringement

By Cody Lee on Jan 3, 2014

Last month, we told you about an interesting new accessory coming out this year for the iPhone called the ‘Typo.’ It’s a case with a built-in Bluetooth keyboard that bills itself as the perfect solution for the folks who still carry both an iPhone and a BlackBerry.

Well, as you can imagine, this hasn’t sat well with BlackBerry. And today the Canadian handset-maker announced that it has filed a lawsuit against Typo, co-founded by TV personality Ryan Seacrest, for “blatantly” copying its iconic QWERTY keyboard design… Read More

 

Apple and Samsung again discussing patent dispute settlement

By Cody Lee on Dec 30, 2013

Apple and Samsung are said to again be conferring over a possible settlement to their years-long patent dispute. According to a new report, the two companies are in “working level discussions” regarding a potential deal.

There are still major obstacles though, and the two firms have a lot of work to do in terms of narrowing their differences over royalty fees and patent access. Apple, for example, wants Samsung to pay up to $30 per device…

Read More

 

Apple renews bid to permanently ban infringing Samsung products that no longer exist

By Christian Zibreg on Dec 27, 2013

The United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in November greenlighted Apple’s appeal to a U.S. district court ruling which had originally rejected the company’s request to ban accused Samsung products from the U.S. market.

Last month’s Appeals court ruling has prompted Judge Lucy Koh to reconsider her original decision and has opened door to a permanent sales ban on more than twenty different Samsung smartphones and tablets.

Sure enough, Apple yesterday renewed its motion to permanently halt the sales of these devices in the United States, even though Samsung no longer offers none of the devices in question… Read More

 

Samsung wants a retrial of its last retrial based on ‘racial prejudice’

By Christian Zibreg on Dec 17, 2013

Following a recent retrial in the Apple v. Samsung case that saw the jury award the former with a cool $290 million on top of the nearly $600 million in previous damages over copying patented iPhone technology, Samsung of South Korea now wants a retrial of the retrial, citing a very unusual argument. Apple throughout the trial has painted Samsung as a “threat” to the local and national economy.

As a result, lawyers for the Galaxy maker in a new court filing are now accusing Apple of racial prejudice and asking judge Lucy Koh to grant Samsung a retrial of its last retrial. Wait, what? Yup, you read that right. The full explanation is after the break… Read More

 

Seoul court rules that iPhone 4s and iPad 2 don’t infringe on Samsung’s patents

By Christian Zibreg on Dec 12, 2013

Back in 2011, the legal spat between Apple and its frenemy and key supplier Samsung started to really escalate as the parties began filing a bunch of lawsuits around the world against each other. The Galaxy maker was hoping to gain the upper hand by filing a patent infringement lawsuit against Apple in its home turf over claimed short message display methods and messaging grouping features.

However, a Korean judge has now tossed Samsung’s claim out of the window, with the Seoul Central District Court ruling that Apple’s iPhone 4s and iPad 2 do not infringe on Samsung Electronics’ commercial patents… Read More

 

WSJ wants antitrust judge taken off e-book case over conflict of interest

By Christian Zibreg on Dec 6, 2013

After the July trial found Apple guilty of ebook price-fixing, the iPhone maker last week filed a complaint over exorbitant lawyer fees. Specifically, court-appointed Michael Bromwich billed the company an unbelievable $138,432 (or the equivalent of 75 percent of a federal judge’s annual salary, as Apple wrote in the complaint), plus a fifteen percent “administrative fee” on top, for a fortnight’s worth of work on overseeing the electronic books price-fixing antitrust case.

It has now come to light that Bromwich and Denise Cote, the very same federal judge who found Apple guilty of price fixing, are in fact old friends. The finding prompted The Wall Street Journal to issue a scathing editorial lambasting Cote over conflict of interest and demanding that the antitrust judge be taken off the case… Read More

 

Apple moves to recover $15 million in legal fees from Samsung

By Christian Zibreg on Dec 6, 2013

Just a day following the mid-November Appeals court ruling which gave Apple another chance to ban Samsung’s infringing devices, the iPhone maker made its case on why it’s entitled to an additional $379 million in pending damages over patent infringement and lost sales in the Apple vs Samsung lawsuit.

Following a short period of deliberation, a jury of six women and two men reached a conclusion for the retrial between Apple and Samsung over damages, ruling the Galaxy maker must pay Apple an additional $290 million on top of more than the $500 million in damages already awarded last year.

But Tim Cook & Co. aren’t stopping there. As reported by an expert patent blogger, Apple is now demanding a cool $15 million in legal fees from Samsung, or one third of Apple attorneys’ fees that total over $60 million… Read More

 

Apple files complaint over exorbitant lawyer fees in e-book antitrust suit

By Christian Zibreg on Nov 29, 2013

If you were a lawyer and Apple hired you on legal matters, what would your charge Tim Cook & Co. for services rendered? A hundred bucks per hour? Three hundred bucks?

How about a whopping $1,150 per hour fee plus a fifteen percent “administrative fee” on top? That’s what one Michael Bromwich attempted to bill Apple for a fortnight’s worth of work on overseeing the electronic books price-fixing antitrust case.

But having a deep-pocketed client such as Apple is by no means a guarantee of the hefty payout, as court-appointed Bromwich discovered after the iPhone maker filed a formal objection over the exorbitant fees… Read More

 

Judge dismisses privacy lawsuit against Apple over location tracking

By Cody Lee on Nov 28, 2013

Reuters is reporting that US District Judge Lucy Koh has dismissed a privacy lawsuit against Apple this week. The suit alleged that the company was collecting location data through iOS devices, even when the geo-location feature was turned off.

Four plaintiffs joint-filed the suit—which is just one of several that followed Apple’s ‘Locationgate’ scandal—in 2011, complaining that not only was Apple tracking users’ location without consent, but they charged them too much for their iPhones… Read More

 

Court denies Samsung’s motion to stay damages in Apple patent retrial

By Christian Zibreg on Nov 26, 2013

As you know, in a retrial last week a jury of six women and two men determined that Samsung owes Apple $290 million for lifting patented iPhone technologies, bringing the total amount of damages to $929 million versus the original $1.05 billion ruling. The South Korean Galaxy maker has immediately filed a motion to delay the payout on the grounds of reevaluation of the validity of the Apple patent No. 7,844,915, which covers the famous pinch-to-zoom gesture.

The presiding Judge Lucy Koh denied Samsung motion’s last night as she appeared concerned about the potential implications of such ruling, including whether granting a stay would unethically favor Apple… Read More

 
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