Appeals court reopens Apple vs. Samsung case over iPhone’s patented design

By Christian Zibreg on Jan 13, 2017

Believe it or not, the longstanding Apple vs. Samsung patent spat over iPhone’s iconic design is now in its sixth year. During that time, Samsung was found guilty of infringing upon Apple’s patented smartphone design, including iPhone’s rectangular front face with rounded metal edges and a grid of colorful icons on a black screen.

The United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit reopened that lawsuit yesterday after a recommendation from the U.S. Supreme Court to determine how much Samsung should pay the Cupertino firm over copying iPhone’s look and feel, according to court documents uncovered by Law360.com. Read More

 

US appeals court rules Apple can be sued for monopolizing app market

By Cody Lee on Jan 13, 2017

iPhone app purchasers may sue Apple over allegations that it has monopolized the mobile app market by not allowing users to purchase them outside the App Store, reports Reuters. The decision comes from the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, and it revives a long-standing lawsuit regarding Apple’s iPhone app practices.

In 2012, a group of iPhone users filed to sue Apple, saying its App Store exclusivity was anticompetitive. Apple responded to the suit, saying that  users purchase apps from developers, and it merely rents out the space. A lower court sided with the Cupertino company, and threw the case out, but today’s decision reverses the order. Read More

 

Apple must replace a Danish man’s iPhone with a new unit rather than a refurbished model

By Christian Zibreg on Dec 9, 2016

Following a five-year fight over marketing manager David Lysgaard’s faulty iPhone 4 he bought in 2011 from Apple.com, the Glostrup District Court has ruled that Apple did violate the Danish Sale of Goods Act by giving the man a “remanufactured” device instead of the brand new phone he was entitled to in accordance with local law, Domstol.dk reported Friday. Apple’s warranty terms state that refurbs use either brand new parts or those that are equivalent to new in performance and reliability. Read More

 

Supreme Court rules for Samsung in dispute with Apple over patent damages

By Cody Lee on Dec 6, 2016

The US Supreme Court on Tuesday ruled in favor of Samsung in a dispute over damages related to Apple’s iPhone design, reports CNBC. The decision means that Samsung won’t be held liable for all $399 million awarded to Apple in a previous lower court ruling.

That amount is based on profits of 11 Samsung smartphones that were found guilty of infringing on Apple’s designs, but Samsung argued the penalty is disproportionate. It believes it should only be liable for profits from specific components, and the Court agreed. Read More

 

iPhone 6 “Touch Disease” class action suit gets support from three additional law firms

By Christian Zibreg on Oct 10, 2016

Class action lawsuit pertaining to an iPhone 6 Plus hardware flaw, referred to as “Touch Disease,” has gained support from three additional law firms.

Motherboard reports that lawyers who filed the original class action complaint have now signed on three additional law firms to support their case.

An additional “Touch Disease” class action suit has been filed against Apple in Utah and there is also a similar class action suit in Canada. Read More

 

US Supreme Court to tackle the outcome of monster Apple vs. Samsung lawsuit tomorrow

By Christian Zibreg on Oct 10, 2016

Samsung is on the hook for $399 million in damages owed to Apple for stealing its patented iPhone designs in what’s become the first legal battle over design patents in nearly 120 years.

A typical design patent covers the ornamental look of an object rather than any functional aspect.

According to Bloomberg this morning, the United States Supreme Court will determine the outcome of the monster Apple v. Samsung lawsuit on Tuesday, October 11. Read More

 

Apple ordered to pay VirnetX $302.4 million in patent retrial

By Christian Zibreg on Oct 1, 2016

A jury has ordered Apple to pay $302.4 million to VirnetX Holding Corp over using its patented virtual private networking protocols in FaceTime and iMessage on the iPhone, iPad and Mac. The case will now go to the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Washington DC before VirnetX sees any payout, Reuters and Bloomberg reported today. Read More

 

Apple’s case against Samsung gets support from Dieter Rams, Calvin Klein & other designers

By Christian Zibreg on Aug 4, 2016

Apple’s mega-lawsuit against Samsung is now in the hands of the United States Supreme Court, which should start hearing Samsung’s appeal over Apple’s design patent case in October. Ahead of court proceedings, Apple today filed an amicus brief containing support from 111 famed designers.

Some of them include well-known names like Jony Ive’s friend Dieter Rams, fashion designer Calvin Klein and iSpaceship building designers over at Lord Norman Foster. Read More

 

Judge voids $625 million verdict against Apple in VirnetX patent spat

By Christian Zibreg on Aug 1, 2016

In February 2016, a federal jury ordered that Apple pay $625 million to VirnetX Holding Corp after being found guilty of willfully infringing on technologies found in VirnetX’s patents related to virtual private networking protocols. Friday, the judge voided that ruling after determining that the case should be revisited, CNBC reports. VirnetX alleges that its patented technology is used in FaceTime and iMessage on the iPhone, iPad and Mac. Read More

 

Dutch court rules against replacing a user’s defective iPhone 6s with a refurbished unit

By Christian Zibreg on Jul 12, 2016

Speaking of lawsuits, a Dutch court has reportedly ruled in favor of a woman who took it upon herself to drag Apple to court over offering to replace her damaged iPhone 6 Plus with a refurbished rather than a brand new handset. This is Apple’s standard policy in many markets, including where I live.

Recently, I took my iPhone 6s to a store over a faulty Home button and instead of servicing it they decided to give me a refurbished handset.

A judge in Amsterdam, however, was unimpressed and has ordered that Apple refund the plaintiff the full price she paid for her device. Read More

 

Patent troll hits Apple with a new lawsuit targeting iPhone battery technologies

By Christian Zibreg on Jul 12, 2016

Another day, another anti-Apple lawsuit. In addition to being sued over iOS 9’s performance on older iPhones and bricking iPhones that use non-sanctioned Home button and Touch ID replacement parts, the Cupertino firm now faces a new patent lawsuit targeting the iPhone’s battery technologies and an associated trickle-charge system. Read More

 

China’s media administrative wing sues Apple over 1990s war film

By Christian Zibreg on Jul 4, 2016

A subsidiary of China’s broadcasting regulator is taking Apple to court over showing a propaganda film which was released back in the 1990s, reports The Associated Press. The plaintiff—Movie Satellite Channel Program Production Center, which comes under the State Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Television—alleges that the iPhone maker has infringed its exclusive online rights to broadcast its movie which depicts Chinese fighting against Japanese soldiers in northern China in the early 1930s. Read More

 

Judge tosses ‘Error 53’ lawsuit against Apple out of the window

By Christian Zibreg on Jun 21, 2016

A United States district court judge has tossed so-called ‘Error 53’ lawsuit against Apple out of the window on grounds that the plaintiffs “lack standing to pursue injunctive relief”. The plaintiffs argued that the iOS 9 software update causing certain devices with a faulty Touch ID or Home button, like the iPhone 6, to be bricked has resulted in permanent data loss.

They were unable, however, to frame the argument in court a legal loss. Read More

 

Beijing court orders iPhone 6 sales ban over patent infringement, Apple to appeal ruling

By Christian Zibreg on Jun 17, 2016

Apple just hit yet another roadblock in China with news that the Beijing Intellectual Property Office (BJIPO) has ordered the company to halt sales of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus on the grounds that the Apple handset copied the design of the 100C smartphone, which is being produced by Shenzhen Baili, one of China’s phone vendors.

Apple has confirmed that it will challenge the sales ban by appealing to the Beijing Higher People’s Court and the Supreme People’s Court. Read More

 

VoIP-Pal slaps Apple with $2.8 billion lawsuit over patent used in FaceTime and iMessage

By Christian Zibreg on May 10, 2016

Voice over IP (VoIP), a technology for the delivery of voice communications and multimedia sessions over the Internet, is at the heart of an unbelievable $2.8 billion patent infringement lawsuit that VoIP-Pal, a Bellevue-based company, filed this morning against the iPhone maker.

“We are confident the current good will on both sides will result in a favorable outcome for all parties involved,” said VoIP-Pal CEO Emil Malak in a prepared statement. Read More

 

German court rules against Apple in OpenTV patent case

By Cody Lee on Mar 16, 2016

A  German court on Wednesday ruled against Apple in a case over video streaming patents, reports Reuters. The court found the iPhone maker in infringement of digital content streaming patents owned by OpenTV.

OpenTV first sued Apple in 2014, alleging that various products infringe its patents, including the iPhone and iPad. It has also gone after other major technology companies as part of an ongoing IP licensing campaign. Read More

 

Apple will pay $450 million fine in e-book case as Supreme Court declines to hear appeal

By Christian Zibreg on Mar 7, 2016

Apple’s legal battle with the United States government over alleged price fixing in an e-book antitrust case has now come to an end after nearly three years.

As the United States Supreme Court has declined to hear Apple’s appeal, the iPhone maker will have to pay a $450 million fine to settle its long-standing federal court case with class action lawyers and state district attorneys.

Bloomberg reported Monday that the justices turned away Apple’s appeal without comment. Apple has been found to have conspired with major book publishers and orchestrated a scheme to raise prices of electronic books on the iBooks Store. Read More

 

Here’s what Apple’s chief lawyer will tell Congress tomorrow regarding FBI’s controversial request

By Christian Zibreg on Feb 29, 2016

As you know, the Federal Bureau of Investigation has obtained a court order demanding that Apple produce a special version of iOS with decreased security to help government spooks brute-force their way into an iPhone 5c which belonged to San Bernardino shooter Syed Farook.

Following the interview that Apple CEO Tim Cook gave to ABC News, in which he said that the government is asking for “the software equivalent of cancer,” Apple’s Senior Vice President and General Counsel, Bruce Sewell, will testify before the House Judiciary Committee tomorrow.

Here’s his opening statement in which he challenges the government’s request and argues that the FBI should have no say over the products American companies create. Read More

 

Apple’s $120 million patent victory against Samsung overturned

By Cody Lee on Feb 26, 2016

An appeals court on Friday ruled that Samsung won’t have to pay Apple $119.6 million for infringing its patents, reports Bloomberg. The court found two of Apple’s patents, including one for its slide-to-unlock feature, to be invalid and a third wasn’t infringed.

Today’s ruling overturns a verdict reached by a California jury in May 2014, which found Samsung devices to infringe on Apple’s patents. It also upholds a decision to make Apple pay Samsung $158,400 in damages for infringing on its video compression patent. Read More

 

Apple vehemently opposes FBI request to create iPhone backdoor in San Bernardino court case

By Christian Zibreg on Feb 17, 2016

Apple is vehemently opposing the FBI’s request to create a backdoor in iOS that would permit authorities to access encrypted data on the iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino shooters. In an open letter to all customers posted on the company’s website, CEO Tim Cook acknowledges that Apple believes that the FBI’s intentions are good and makes note of the fact that his company has done “everything that is both within our power and within the law” to help the authorities.

“But now the U.S. government has asked us for something we simply do not have, and something we consider too dangerous to create,” he wrote. “They have asked us to build a backdoor to the iPhone.” Read More

 
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