Help

How to call your destination when using the Maps app on Apple Watch

It’s the little shortcuts Apple Watch can provide in life that make wearing the device oh so rewarding at times. The most prominent ones have certainly saturated Apple’s marketing and most corners of the internet by now, still many smaller tricks are hardly covered simply because they can be so darn hard to find.

The following one certainly falls into that category, as I had never heard or read about it before, and I frankly came across it by pure chance. If you have to hit the roads regularly and rely on Apple Maps and your watch to get to your destination, it’s a deft shortcut that makes sure you can keep your eyes on the road at all times – even if you need to make a phone call to the place you are currently headed!

How to have the Music app only show songs stored on your device

Thanks to the introduction of goodies like the iCloud Music Library and more recently Apple Music, your Music app on iPhone and iPad has not only turned from a luscious red color into a plain icon, but has also become decidedly more convoluted.

The main change since the coming of the cloud-based additions to the Music app? Songs no longer have to be stored locally on your device in order to be visible and playable. In case you haven’t yet found the trick hiding in plain sight to only play the songs downloaded to your device (and prevent exorbitant data charges), let’s fill you in now!

How to view GPS coordinates of any location on iPhone

To specify an exact location on a map, we have come to use addresses, landmarks or other easily identifiable spots as waypoints for our orientation. It’s common sense, right? Right. Except that the concept of reading a geographic map through a prism of man-made constructions is pretty flawed. This is especially true when you use various different services like Apple and Google Maps, who often yield inconsistent results for the same addresses, places and whatnot.

Enter latitude and longitude, the most reliable and unalienable GPS coordinates you can deploy to pinpoint a location. The best thing about them? Not only are they universally used and there’s unique codes for both your and your neighbour’s house, but they are also consistent no matter the mapping service you use.

In the spirit of that, the following piece will teach you how to show the GPS coordinates of any location on iPhone so that you can respond something like ’37.3305, -122.0296’ next time your friend asks for your whereabouts. And if you’re curious how to find that GPS location in Maps, we will demonstrate that too!

How to automatically create an Apple Music playlist with songs you identified with Shazam

Not long ago, we’ve chatted all things song recognition through Siri, Apple’s increasingly potent virtual assistant on iOS and Mac. Today, on the heels of that, we are looking at the source of Siri’s acquired musical skills, Shazam, and bringing you another tip to eliminate friction between song identification on Shazam and listening to said track any time in the future on Apple Music.

Imagine yourself summoning Shazam a few times on your car ride home, then slumping onto your couch after arrival and immediately having all identified songs at the ready, waiting to be consumed inside Apple Music. Like that example case? If that’s a tacit yes, be sure to check out the walkthrough below, because you’re only one switch away from automatically embedding your shazamed tracks into your Apple Music Library.

How to see the full history of songs Siri has identified for you

For quite a while now, Siri has been able to listen to and detect music playing from nearby sources courtesy of the integration of the wildly successful app Shazam. It has also become a lot smarter and seamless in terms of the process, and a quick request as simple as Hey Siri, what’s that song? will often yield the answer you were looking for.

A popular issue with this? Well, use the feature on numerous occasions and so long as you are not blessed with a razor sharp memory, song information of multiple tunes identified will quickly bleed into one irretrievable mess. Especially the day after or even later. So what can we do to review all song requests ever hurled at Siri on your iPhone? Luckily, there’s a tab for that!

How to turn off notifications for specific podcasts

We are currently disassembling Apple’s Podcasts app here on iDB, turning over every rock in iOS to help you make the most of what the seemingly basic app has to offer. After walking you through automatic downloads for your favorite shows earlier this week, we’re back with another slick little trick designed to cut down unwanted notification clutter perpetrated by the app.

Because notwithstanding your fondness for the dozen podcasts you love to zap through, collectively they sure can generate a bevy of notifications on your iPhone. Speaking from experience, the crux of the matter is that some of these notifications are much more hotly anticipated (e.g. surprise releases) than others (daily shows), which means neither leaving all podcasts notifications activated nor fully switching them off is going to genuinely cut the mustard for most users.

If you have made it this far, you will already have an inkling that there is luckily enough a much more satisfying middle way. And thankfully, you called it right. The square, purple icon on your Home screen itself holds the answers we need when it comes to selectively dumping the episode-drop notifications. So in the interest of a tidy Notification Center and minimal maintenance efforts, here’s how to remain in control of podcast notifications by toggling off the ones that have been bugging you for too long.

Apple wants to zero in on ‘Pro’ segment, but what about the large majority?

In a statement warmly welcomed by us internet folk, Tim Cook recently proclaimed “you will see us do more in the pro area.” In our circles, this is unquestionably good news, as we all foster an insatiable appetite for new innovations, be that on a hardware or software level. More pro is great, however I invariably had to spare a thought for the average, not-so techy Apple customer.

I’m talking about the type of customer that after owning their iPhone 6S for more than a year, still has little concept of what 3D Touch does. Or how about the one that loves their new MacBook, but will gaze at you with a stunned expression when you introduce them to Force Touch on their trackpad. This is by no means meant to sound snarky or patronizing, because as a matter of fact, I don’t blame them for not knowing – I blame Apple for failing to take everyone along for the ride due to poor communication.

Shifting up the ‘Pro’ a notch in the future sounds great, that said how do you straddle the line between pleasing us tech-warriors and not entirely overwhelming a large majority of users, a majority already only privity to roughly half of the juicy features on their devices? Apple needs to find some cogent answers to this issue, and rather than creating a two-tier system in their hardware sold (labelling only some products ‘Pro’), I contend that software could be the key.