Emulator

Delta Beta 3: iOS emulator gets an update

After a considerable hiatus, Riley Testut has returned today with a third beta of his emulator application for iOS, Delta.

A relatively small changelog accompanies this update to the gaming application, a successor to the ever-popular GBA4iOS, and almost three months separate it from the previous release, Beta 2.

Delta emulator for iOS beta 2 released

Riley Testut’s new project Delta, the retro game console emulator, continued its early phase testing yesterday, with the release of a second build for those on its closed beta testing program. According to Testut, healthy feedback from the testers resulted in a slew of bugs and improvement suggestions reported from the first beta, and this second iteration consequently comes with a handy list of fixes and additions.

Delta iOS emulator beta: first impressions

Today saw the start of the beta program for the long-awaited iOS emulator from developer Riley Testut, Delta. Capable of emulating a wide range of vintage game consoles, this spiritual successor to GBA4iOS boasts a broader feature-set and a polished UI. We managed to get one of the prized places on the Delta beta testing program, and can give you an early glimpse of how it’s shaping up.

GBA4iOS creator launching new SNES, Game Boy & Nintendo 64 emulator in beta this December

Developer Riley Testut, the brains behind a Game Boy emulator for iOS called GBA4iOS, said on Twitter yesterday that he is now focusing his energies on a brand new software designed to emulate the hardware of popular SNES, Game Boy and Nintendo 64 consoles. He’s calling it Delta and it’s launching this December in beta although a teaser website does not reveal if this will be an app that you’ll be able to sideload onto an iOS device without jailbreaking.

How to install emulators on your iPhone or iPad, no jailbreak required

Emulators are a way to play your favorite childhood games on your iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad without carrying the game disks or cartridges and game consoles around with you. Instead, they sideload the games on your device as a piece of software, and they’re given controls that are adapted for the touch screen.

In this tutorial, we’ll be showing you a method that still works to this day for getting emulators on your iOS device, and the best part is, you don’t even have to be jailbroken to do any of it.

Check out an unofficial client which lets your Apple TV stream Steam games from a PC

Kevin Smith, the developer behind the MAME emulator that allows you to run classic Nintendo and Sega games, as well as play arcade games on your fourth-generation Apple TV, is back with another cool software: an unofficial client that can stream Steam games from a Windows PC to Apple’s new box.

The solution takes advantage of an iOS edition of Moonlight, an open source implementation of Nvidia’s GameStream technology used by its Shield console.

Moonlight technology makes it possible to stream the full collection of Steam games from a PC to the new Apple TV without needing to run on the Apple TV hardware.

How to play MAME arcade games on Apple TV

Along with being able to play classic Nintendo and Sega games on your Apple TV, you can also play classic arcade titles. Doing so is made possible by a port of MAME, which stands for Multiple Arcade Machine Emulator. Unfortunately there isn’t yet a GitHub page setup for the MAME tvOS port, but the same developer that created the MAME emulator that we showed you a while back has made the full Xcode project available for download.

How to play classic Nintendo and Sega games on Apple TV

I’ve been playing Super Mario World on my Apple TV, and I absolutely love it. I’m able to do this by loading an emulator called Provenance on my Apple TV. You won’t find Provenance in the App Store, but Apple has given us the ability to sideload apps ourselves, and Provenance is one such app that can be sideloaded.

In this tutorial, I’ll show you how to sideload Provenance, and how to start playing old Nintendo and Sega Classics on your Apple TV, including the NES, SNES, GBA, Genesis, Game Gear, and more. If you like classic games, then you simply don’t want to miss this.

MAME emulator shown running on an Apple TV dev kit

The new Apple TV, which still lacks an official launch date, but is scheduled to touch down sometime in late October, is looking like quite the winner. Not only do the apps look great, but the Siri remote looks lightyears better than its predecessor. Even more exciting, for me however, is the prospect of running old school games by way of emulators.

While it’s doubtful that we’ll ever see emulators allowed in the App Store, users can now take it upon themselves to side load apps using Xcode 7. With this in mind, several developers have taken the initiative to create Apple TV emulators. One of the latest emulators to be shown off is a MAME emulator by developer Kevin Smith.

MAME stands for Multiple Arcade Machine Emulator, and as its name states, it allows gamers to emulate games from a variety of arcade hardware. As first spotted by MacRumors’ Juli Clover, Smith has posted a video of the his MAME emulator running on an Apple TV dev kit.

How to compile apps using Xcode 7 to run on a non-jailbroken device

As of iOS 9, you no longer need to rely on a jailbreak if you want to run some of the apps that aren’t available on the App Store. All you need is a Mac, Xcode 7, the code you wish to compile, an iOS device running iOS 9, a free developer account, and some time. If you have all of those things, then you can install apps on your iPhone or iPad without a paid developer account, and without a jailbreak.

Compiling apps using Xcode 7 is fairly straightforward, but if you’ve never done it before, it can be a bit tricky. In this post, I’ll show you how to compile code using Xcode 7 and run it on your iOS 9 device. I’ll also discuss some of the errors and issues that you might incur along the way.