Eddy Cue

Apple Music now has more than 20 million subscribers

Apple Music has surpassed 20 million paid subscribers, the company’s SVP of Internet software and services tells Billboard. That marks a 15% jump in the last 3 months, when Apple announced it had passed 17 million users during its iPhone event in September.

That’s impressive considering the streaming music service is less than two years old and up against veterans like Spotify with much larger user bases. Cue attributes some of Apple Music’s growth to its string of exclusive deals with artists like Drake and Travis Scott.

A fascinating look at how artificial intelligence and machine learning work at Apple

Respected journalist Steven Levy has scored another nice exclusive with a new write-up over at Backchannel, a Wired Media Group property, giving us a rare inside look at how artificial intelligence and machine learning work at Apple.

The article contains a lot of gems, with company executives Eddy Cue, Craig Federighi, Phil Schiller and Siri leads Tom Gruber and Alex Acero providing a bunch of previously unknown facts about Apple’s AI efforts, including this one: machine learning has enabled Apple to cut Siri’s error rate by a factor or two.

Craig Federighi and Eddy Cue on learning from Maps debacle and improving the service

Monday, Fast Company interviewed CEO Tim Cook and other Apple executives, with Cook revealing that public iOS betas actually exist to help improve the Maps service, which was widely panned and ridiculed over egregious inaccuracies shortly after its September 2012 debut.

Today, the publication interviewed Eddy Cue, Apple’s boss of Internet Software and Services, and Craig Federighi, who is Apple’s chief of Software Engineering, on learning from Maps failures.

Here’s what they had to say about improving Maps over the years.

You’ll be surprised to learn why Apple provides public iOS betas

Fast Company today published a wide ranging interview with Apple’s boss Tim Cook, software boss Craig Federighi and Eddy Cue, who is in charge of Internet software and services, that touches upon a number of interesting topics, including competition, iPhone sales slowdown, why public iOS betas exist (the real reason is now what you think) and more.

Cook also comments on the gloom-and-doom sentiment that has always surrounded Apple while admitting that the company does make mistakes along the way, and more.

Eddy Cue: Apple is a delivery platform, not a Netflix rival (plus, skinny bundle “is a misconception”)

Eddy Cue, 52, Apple’s Senior Vice President of Internet Software and Services, sat down for an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, answering a series of questions related to Apple’s alleged attempts to introduce a skinny bundle of television programming on iTunes, its relationship with content owners and swirling rumors that it may be invested in creating original programming to become the next Netflix or Comcast.

An ecstatically happy Eddy Cue makes the frontpage of SF Chronicle

Eddy Cue, Apple’s Senior Vice President of Internet Software and Services, is a huge basketball fan so it goes without saying that he has an office full of Duke memorabilia and has been regularly spotted at NBA games over the years.

Last night, the Golden State Warriors beat the Oklahoma City Thunder 96-88 in Game 7 of the NBA Western Conference finals in Oakland, California.

Needless to say, he was there and now a photograph of an ecstatically happy Cue has made the frontage of the San Francisco Chronicle.

Apple is making a TV show about app economy starring Will.i.am

Apple has recently been the subject of speculation that it’s plunging into TV show production and today the company has confirmed that its first foray into original TV is a brand new series about app economy starring music artist Will.i.am.

In an interview with The New York Times, Apple’s Vice President of Internet Software and Services, Eddy Cue, said that its working with rap artist Will.i.am and TV executives Ben Silverman and Howard T. Owens on the nonscripted series about apps.

Eddy Cue: what if FBI forces Apple to spy on users via iPhone’s camera or microphone?

Not a day goes by without one of Apple’s executives reaffirming the company’s position on encryption. In a new Spanish-language interview with Univision, Eddy Cue, Apple’s Senior Vice President of Internet Software and Services, made the case against the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) gaining additional surveillance powers.

Were the government to force Apple to create a version of iOS with decreased security, nothing would prevent it from seeking other concessions, Cue said.

“For example, one day the FBI may want us to open your phone’s camera, microphone,” he cautioned. “Those are things we can’t do now. But if they can force us to do that, I think that’s very bad.”

Apple appears to have upped the iTunes Match track limit

According to a report by blogger Kirk McElhearn, Apple has increased iTunes Match and iCloud Music Library track limits above the original 25,000 track threshold. This increase, while yet to be officially acknowledged by Apple, has been in the cards since at least summer.

Although Eddy Cue, who serves as Apple’s Senior Vice President of Internet Software and Services, said that the limit would rise to 100,000 around the iOS 9 release, the increase hit an apparent delay, and has just now begun to roll out to users.