Consumer Reports

Consumer Reports reportedly stands by its controversial MacBook Pro battery findings

As you probably heard, the influential consumer organization Consumer Reports is not recommending Apple’s new MacBook Pro due to inconsistent battery performance. Apple’s marketing honcho Phill Schiller responded by saying that the product-testing magazine’s test results don’t match the company’s own data. 9to5Mac reached out to Consumer Reports to learn more about their findings, here’s what the magazine had to say.

Schiller: Apple working with Consumer Reports to understand MacBook Pro battery results

Apple is working with Consumer Reports to better understand their MacBook Pro battery tests, according to Phil Schiller. The company’s SVP of marketing sent out a tweet late Friday night, saying CR’s test results don’t match Apple’s data.

Schiller’s comments follow Consumer Reports’ scathing review of Apple’s new MacBook Pro, in which the product-testing magazine said, for the first time ever, that it could not recommend the laptop due to inconsistencies in battery life.

Consumer Reports won’t recommend new MacBook Pros over inconsistent battery life

Consumer Reports will not be recommending Apple’s latest MacBook Pro models due to inconsistent battery performance, the magazine said Thursday. After conducting a battery of tests, Consumer Reports discovered that battery life across all new Pros varied “dramatically” from one test to another.

On the other hand (as I note in this article), the battery woes might be caused by a software issue in Safari for Mac because Chrome (a notorious battery hog) fared far better in the tests.

Be that as it may, Apple’s latest notebooks received low rating and failed to earn Consumer Report’s recommendation “after battery life issues surfaced during testing”. As a result, the new MacBook Pro is the first Apple notebook that did not receive a Consumer Reports recommendation, said the magazine.

Apple ranks highest in annual Consumer Reports satisfaction survey for computer support services

Once again, Apple has managed to maintain the highest score for overall satisfaction when it comes to computer technical support, Consumer Reports, the influential U.S. magazine published monthly by Consumers Union since 1936, has found in its July 2015 issue.

The non-profit organization first began polling customers about the topic back in 2007. Apple’s tech support is “by far the most effective of any computer brand’s,” the magazine revealed. If you own a Windows PC, there’s only a 50-50 chance that a manufacturer’s tech support will solve your problem, the survey found.

Consumer Reports won’t recommend Samsung Galaxy S6, paints it inferior to last-gen Galaxy S5

Consumer Reports, an influential U.S. magazine that publishes trusted and mostly unbiased reviews and comparisons of consumer products, has recommended Apple’s iPhone in the past, but now they wouldn’t recommend Samsung’s latest Galaxy S6 flagship smartphone, which released a month ago, over the last-generation Galaxy S5.

You read that right, last year’s Galaxy actually ranked higher than the Galaxy S6 in Consumer Reports’ ratings. Putting the S6 through its battery of scientific tests, the publications has made some surprising, if not controversial, conclusions.

Apple Watch rated best smartwatch by Consumer Reports as it passes tests with flying colors

After putting eleven smartwatches through various tests, Consumer Reports rated the Stainless Steel Apple Watch as the best of the category. Putting Apple, Samsung, Pebble, Sony, Martian, Asus, LG, and Motorola in direct competition, the folks at Consumer Reports took the eleven smartwatches through their labs to test for durability, health functionality, readability in bright and low light, ease of use, and ease of interaction.

Consumer Reports: new iPhones ‘not as bendy as believed’

Consumer Reports says the new iPhones “aren’t as bendy as believed,” after testing both handsets, alongside other top smartphones. Using a three-point flexural test, the outlet found that the iPhone 6 can withstand 70 pounds of pressure before deforming, and the 6 Plus can take up to 90.

That was good enough to beat HTC’s One (M8)—which makes this bendgate tweet a bit ironic—but both iPhones still finished well behind the LG G3 and Samsung’s Note 3. The bottom line, though, is Consumer Reports says it expects “that any of these phones should stand up to typical use.”

Consumer Reports praises new iPhones, but calls latest Droids a better buy

A lot (some?) of people partially base their purchasing decisions on reviews and comparisons of consumer products by Consumer Reports, an influential U.S. monthly published by Consumers Union since 1936. It also irked Apple fans over milking the iPhone 4 over Antennagate meme for all it was worth.

In turn, Consumer Reports lost some of its credibility and luster, especially after it changed its mind and backtracked on its original ‘can’t recommend the iPhone 4’ stance.

Today, the publication is back at it again, having put Apple’s new iPhones through their paces. Even though it loved the iPhone 5c and came away impressed with the iPhone 5s’s improved camera and Touch ID fingerprint scanning, Consumer Reports still thinks Motorola’s latest Droid handsets are a better buy versus the new iPhones…

Consumer Reports weighs in on device upgrade plans

Earlier this week, we took a comparative look at the various new device upgrade plans that carriers have introduced over the last several days. There’s T-Mobile’s ‘Jump’ plan, AT&T Next, and Verizon’s ‘Edge’ program.

After crunching some numbers, we found that T-Mobile’s offering was the better of the three, as it doesn’t include device subsidy costs in its rate plans. And it looks like Consumer Reports, who did its own math, agrees…