802.11ac

New videos highlight iPhone 6’s faster Wi-Fi and real-world multitasking performance

A pair of videos have surfaced this week offering a good look at real-world multitasking performance of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus relative to competition, while demonstrating the speedy 802.11ac wireless networking Apple’s implemented on both devices.

The results suggest that the new iPhones offer nearly three times faster Wi-Fi performance than the iPhone 5s while beating out Samsung’s Galaxy S5 and HTC’s One M8 handsets in app loading times and task switching.

Broadcom launches Gigabit Wi-Fi chip that will likely power the next iPhone

Imagination Technologies, the fabless British semiconductor maker, yesterday at Mobile World Congress detailed its new PowerVR graphics which outperforms Nvidia’s Tegra K1 platform and is a likely candidate for the next iPhone’s GPU. And now, another premium silicon vendor has announced a chip that could just as easily find its way into future iOS devices.

I’m talking about Broadcom, whose Wi-Fi chips and other controller components are used in the iPhone 5s and iPad lineup. The Irvine, California based firm announced at Mobile World Congress a new fifth-generation 802.11ac Wi-Fi component which doubles data throughput and increases Wi-Fi coverage by up to 30 percent.

Should Apple choose to tap it, the iPhone 6 and the next iPad will adopt Gigabit Wi-Fi aka 802.11ac, the latest and greatest standard in wireless networking for the consumer market…

Wi-Fi Alliance launches 802.11ac certification

The so-called Gigabit Wi-Fi, better known as 802.11ac, has yet to be officially ratified but that hasn’t stopped Apple from implementing the technology on the refreshed MacBook Air lineup and the redesigned AirPort Extreme and Time Capsule base stations, which were both announced during the WWDC keynote earlier this month.

That said, it’s fairly safe to assume that Apple will also roll out 802.11ac across the upcoming iPhone 5S, iPad 5, iPad mini 2 and a next-gen Mac Pro, Apple TV and MacBook. For what it’s worth, Apple reportedly partnered with chip maker Broadcom to outfit all Macs with 802.11ac chips.

Apple is usually among the first companies – if not the first – to implement each new major revision to the Wi-Fi standard. And while this allows Apple’s customers to live on the bleeding edge of technology, it also exposes early adopters to their fair share of teething issues…

The new AirPort Extreme can house SATA hard drive, teardown reveals

Apple at Monday’s WWDC 2013 keynote briefly mentioned its refreshed AirPort Extreme and Time Capsule wireless appliances which now support Gigabit Wi-Fi, also known as 802.11ac, for three times throughput of 802.11an. In unveiling the sixth-generation AirPort Extreme, Apple’s marketing honcho Phil Schiller somewhat cryptically alluded that the redesigned base station might accept internal storage.

“There’s also room in there for a hard drive,” he quipped. Sure enough, teardown wizards over at iFixit bought a brand spanking new unit and tore it apart, finding 3.5 inches of empty space inside…

Apple updates AirPort Utility with 802.11ac support

As you know, Apple alongside a host of software-focused announcements today also refreshed its AirPort wireless appliances with compatibility for the latest 802.11ac standard, also known as Gigabit Ethernet. As a result, the updated AirPort Express and Time Capsule base stations can now transfer data up to three times faster, and more reliably too. And to go along with the hardware refresh, the company has pushed new versions of AirPort Utility for iOS and Mac…

New evidence shows 802.11ac headed to future Macs

Are you ready for faster wireless speeds? How about better range? If so, then you’ll be happy to hear that new evidence shows that Apple is implementing 802.11ac support into its latest version of its desktop OS.

The OS X 10.8.4 beta release, that we told you about earlier, contains code not contained in previous versions of the OS. This code suggests that Apple is adding Gigabit wireless support, which is also known as 802.11ac, to future Mac hardware.