macbook pro

Apple has come to the conclusion that a hidden setting in Safari caused the odd battery results in Consumer Reports’ MacBook Pro review that kept the publication from recommending the laptop. In a statement to AppleInsider, the company said it worked with CR’s team over the holidays and determined that its testing methods were flawed.

“We learned that when testing battery life on Mac notebooks, Consumer Reports uses a hidden Safari setting for developing web sites which turns off the browser cache. This is not a setting used by customers and does not reflect real-world usage. Their use of this developer setting also triggered an obscure and intermittent bug reloading icons which created inconsistent results in their lab. After we asked Consumer Reports to run the same test using normal user settings, they told us their MacBook Pro systems consistently delivered the expected battery life. We have also fixed the bug uncovered in this test. This is the best pro notebook we’ve ever made, we respect Consumer Reports and we’re glad they decided to revisit their findings on the MacBook Pro.”

Apple says the Safari fix is available to developers in the latest macOS 10.12.3 beta, and will be released to the public in a future macOS update. Consumer Reports says it will update its original review once it’s done re-testing its MacBook Pros.

Since its introduction late last year, the revamped MacBook Pro has been entrenched in controversy. In addition to the battery life complaints, a number of loyal Apple customers have expressed disappointment with the new laptop’s higher price tag, and lack of “pro” internals, and it’s fueled the growing consensus that Apple is ignoring its Mac line.

Source: AppleInsider

  • burge

    So Apple doesn’t fully test its own devices/software with all known testing options available, and they say it’s the best yet. So why is Apple tweaking it’s software to fix this issue that they built into it. Not the best until it’s had a software tweak. Lol.

    • Well for one, this was a developer setting, not a front-end setting that your average user uses all the time. Apple, just like Facebook and many other tech giants, aims for stability of the software for the user before they fix bugs in the more advanced sectors, such as that for developers or for commercial use. Making the software better for the user is an important part of their business model. You would be hard-pressed to find a company in tech that has flawless back-end software because they spend most of their time and resources on the front-end that everyone in the world sees.

      • burge

        So Apple didn’t know about these hidden settings? So Apple wasn’t expecting others to test the device ? If these hidden settings are new then ok it would of slipped through but I bet there not and Apple know all about these before the device even got made.

        It’s poor testing on Apples behalf. I say this because now apple is fixing this issue. Don’t forget these are hidden settings that the end users don’t use so why the fix if it’s not used or hidden from the end users.

      • Rowan09

        It’s for developer purpose not regular consumers. It wouldn’t make sense to test anything in developer mode when it’s made for only consumers.

      • burge

        So why are Apple ffixing it. Aren’t developers also uses ?

      • Rowan09

        Because it’s a bug. Apple fixed the issue for developers but the fact Consumer reports was testing a developer feature is wrong.

      • GregKorman

        Wrong. Apple shouldn’t be allowed to have caching turned on in their tests while every other laptop gets caching turned off.

        Let Apple’s products stand head to head with everyone else. No special treatment for Apple.

      • Rowan09

        So there wasn’t a bug causing the issue? With the bug fixed is the same battery issue still happening?

      • Kr00

        I think the issue is regardless of which computer they’re testing, turning off battery saving features and turning off browser caching is not real world use or even close to how the average user would use a laptop. If they were testing the extremes of the hardware, they should’ve said so in the report, or at least stated the conditions under which they test their laptops. Again, these tests are no indicative of any real world use, at all. This is the real point, not the safari bug that was found. They tested only 3 MacBooks, one had an anomaly, they failed to find out why or even finding out why the other 2 didn’t have the same issues, but reported the MacBook as a no buy for their readers. Not objective, not professional, not scientific and untruthful of the complete facts. Apple showed CR tests up as being unreal and tainted, hence the retesting. The egg is on CR’s face here, not Apple.

      • GregKorman

        CR turns off caching for ALL browser tests! Not just Apple.

        What people are suggesting is that Apple get an easier test than ALL other laptops. That is ridiculous.

        The ONLY thing that was flawed was the bug in Safari. End of story. CR’s test was not flawed.

        In CR’s re-test, they will continue to have the hidden, developer ‘no-cache’ setting turned ON, because that is part of their standardized test that all laptops are given.

        No special treatment for Apple.

      • Rowan09

        I’m just going according to the article. Personally I don’t care because I don’t own any of the new Macs and don’t pay attention to CR to buy any product.

      • burge

        Why was my first comment deleted? Is this site now becoming such a site that anything said against Apple gets deleted? I thought that people could speak freely and have an option.

        If your not going to let people speak freely ( within reason of cause ) then why don’t you just lock out all comments.

      • Personally, I’m not sure why your comment was deleted, or who deleted it. I didn’t write this article, so it’s not my place to hinder discussion. On the other hand, you do come off as troll-ish, so that could be a leading reason.

      • burge

        So stating that Apple didn’t test this device but can do a software update to fix the issue so it gets a good report by 3rd party’s is being a troll.

        These hidden settings will not be something new and it takes a poor report and 3rd party’s to say tat they would not recommend this device because of poor battery life for Apple to realise that they did a piss poor job of testing this device. And you can not argue with that.

      • It’s may not be what you stated, but perhaps the way you stated it that came off as non-constructive. Again, I have no knowledge of what went on here, as this is not my article, so take what I’m saying with a grain of salt.

        On the other hand, I disagree with your logic about the bug wholeheartedly, because as I stated earlier, it’s Apple’s job to make the software reliable for the end consumer before delivering to the smaller audiences, such as software developers. They can always work on bugs with the development tools later on because developers are generally more tech-savvy than average users and know how to get around issues, after the end user is already taken care of. It’s a business model, like I stated, that many tech companies follow to make money.

      • Anonymouse

        Anthony, this has been a common theme whereby comments are being deleted for the so- called troll label. I am no doubt alone when ai say I have a hard time trying to distinguish the difference between a constructive crticism (or criticism in general) vs a troll comment.
        What is offensive here is that fact a comment is being deleted under dubious reasons or methadology, yet a commenter can tell another to “Piss off idiot moron asswipe” and have that comment remain unaffected.
        It appears the bar at iDB for decency, consistency and fairness isn’t set right. For a site that has been travelling for six years now is just not bloody good enough. I would appreciate ‘someone’ at iDB to tackle this issue once and for all and provide a set of guidelines that are adhered to and preferably with input for the end user. Whatever system or guidelines that are in place at the moment appear to suck quite frankly. I’m directings this at you given your previous experience at Modmyi where you appeared to be held in high regard and whereby you also appeared to field a large volume of comments.
        I trust iDB take this issue seriously enough to take action.

      • Thanks for your suggestions, I’ll talk to the rest of the iDB staff about it.

      • Kr00

        Would you like a tissue too?

      • burge

        This was two days ago and you’re still at it,

        And you say I’m the troll.

      • Kr00

        Yes you are. I’m just here to keep you out.

      • Kr00
      • Anonymouse

        It would only be needed to wipe off your blood. 🙂

      • Kr00

        Violence. The act of a true coward. Congratulations, you’ve discovered your new low. Must be proud.

      • Kr00

        Poor little boy. Want a tissue?? Have a good cry then. Give your ass a rest and let your mouth have a go for once.

    • madmaxmedia

      You haven’t heard of software bugs before?

      • burge

        Yes and there was loads on early iPhones. That how you got a jailbreak.

        Apple failed with this on testing as these settings are hidden from end users but are used by testers, so now apples fixing them. That’s poor testing from the start by Apple.

      • Kr00

        You clearly know nothing about software coding and the months and months of testing that does go on in house and outside in the developer/beta community. You cannot test for tens of millions of variables in real time and have software ready within one year, thus every OS be it windows linux solaris, android, all have bugs, flaws, vulnerabilities. You’re lack of understanding only makes you look foolish with your attempts to belittle Apple. When you’ve written software code, then come back and tell us how easy it is, or so you think.

      • burge

        If it’s that hard to test all scenarios then why was it found out very quickly when this new device became available by 3rd party’s. Are you saying that Apple can not do this ? My point is third-party independent testers found this issue very quickly and yet Apple didn’t and Apple would of known about these “hidden Safari settings” Apple failed to test what they would of known about and it took 3rd party’s to point this out. This is Apples newest device and it’s getting a update to correct a battery issue that Apple should of found themselves before any independent testing got done. Yes Apple can correct the issue but the issue shouldn’t be there to start with.

      • Kr00

        Oh dear, do I really have to explain it to such an ignoramus like you? SIGH!!!

        Apple actually found the issue (don’t you read the copy or do you just blast away after reading just the headlines?) once they found out the conditions under which the testing was done. CLEARLY CR had enabled the developer advanced setting in Safari (something 99% of users wouldn’t know how or why to do this). Once this obscure situation was found, Apple could hone in on the issue and they did. Any developer worth their salt would know how to enable advanced developer setting in Safari. Obviously you don’t. Now piss off idiot.

      • burge

        Apple only found the issue after it got highlighted independent tests. So you do agree that apple failed with its testing. Thanks .

      • Kr00

        What testing??? Are you a complete idiot or are all your parts still in a box?

      • Kr00

        Trolls know very little about anything.

      • burge

        It’s not trolling at all. Apple didn’t test what I can bet they knew would get tested.

      • Kr00

        How the hell would you know what Apple have or event tested. Were you there? Piss off idiot moron asswipe.

      • Anonymouse

        Kr00, were you there? Since when does a comment made need to be under the circumstances that one has ultimate knowledge and experience on a subject? If that’s the case you may as well wipe out 99% of all the comments ever posted on iDB. Then you feel it’s ok to level off further by telling them to Piss off etc? If you weren’t there is it ok to call you a numbskull jerkoff by that reasoning? And while we’re at it, who is the clown that has decided on what is or isn’t a troll comment, it appears this troll term gets tossed about like a 14 year old with a girlie magazine.

      • Kr00

        Ever done software coding/testing? Bet not. Until then, go join your mate in the back of the queue for an intelligence.

      • Anonymouse

        I bet you use that software coding/testing line question to pick up the chicks?

      • Kr00

        Sure does. Jealous much?

      • burge

        Well they didn’t test this because they’re having to fix it.

        And grow up or are you only 12.

      • Kr00

        I have no time for utter idiotic morons like you who make ridiculously dumb comments about technical aspects of which you have no idea whatsoever. You clearly have no clue about anything but keep shooting your moronic head off. Tell me what kind of software coding/testing have you ever done? None, so shut your hole, both of them.

  • malhal

    So you get full battery life only by re-loading the same page?

    • 5723alex .

      You get the full battery life by running the browser normally.

  • I can add that in the latest versions of Safari turning of cache is indeed bugged, leading to visual bugs and more load times. I use/d it a lot while working on web projects, noticed it was bugged out. I can’t believe it would cost you hours of battery life though.

  • David Gow

    I reread thanks

  • george

    This is 100% apples fault. It’s not consumer reports fault for having to test shitty software.

  • GregKorman

    Wrong.

    CR has redone the tests with browser caching OFF again (as they do with ALL laptops including ALL other MacBooks they have ever reviewed).

    This time, the MacBook did fine with caching OFF again because Apple fixed the Safari bug that was the real reason for the initial bad results in this test.

    This proves it was Apple’s fault, NOT the no-caching test that EVERY other MacBook has taken and has passed with no problems.

    Watch Apple fans immediately stop saying the no-caching test was unfair now that it got good results with caching turned off.