With T-Mobile’s new Digits service, your number can be used across multiple devices

By , Dec 7, 2016

T-Mobile Digits teaser 003

U.S. wireless carrier today unveiled a new service, called Digits, which aims to uncouple your phone number from your mobile devices and wireless service plans.

According to T-Mobile CEO John Legere, Digits makes it so that you can use your T-Mobile number across multiple devices like smartphones, tablets, smartwatches, desktop PCs and wearable devices.

Digits will also permit you to use multiple T-Mobile numbers on the same device, making it easy to combine your work, home and personal numbers on a single smartphone with calls and texts appearing from the same number.

In addition to the devices purchased directly from the carrier, your T-Mobile numbers can be used on devices that are not on the carrier’s network, too. An upcoming iPhone app is required for Digits to work on iOS hardware.

On the Mac, Digits will work in a web browser.

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“This isn’t the first time you can add extra numbers to a device, but this IS the first time you can do it all—multiple numbers on one device and one number on multiple devices—and do it with carrier-grade quality,” said Mike Sievert, T-Mobile’s COO.

The carrier’s confirmed that Digits will be built into certain Samsung devices, including the Galaxy S6, Galaxy S7 and Note 5, provided they’re purchased on the T-Mobile network.

If Digits is used on a device without cellular service, or it’s not connected to T-Mobile’s network, you’ll receive texts and high-definition calls over a Wi-Fi connection. Regardless of the device you’re on, you’ll see your call log, messages, contacts and voicemail.

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The service requires iOS 9 and up, Android 5.0 and later and Firefox or Google Chrome. Simple Choice and T-Mobile One users can now sign up for a Digits beta.

During the beta period, you’ll be able to use a single Digits number on up to five devices or up to five Digits numbers on a single device. Though free while in beta, Digits will require an additional fee when it launches for public consumption in early-2017.

To learn more about Digits, head over to T-Mobile’s website.

Source: T-Mobile

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  • Jerry

    I don’t get it :/ can someone please further explain this?

    • Dood

      Basically it looks like you can use your phone number and if you have another number on the same device. You can switch the numbers with ease. Especially with people that have seperate lines for their business or for work. You can combine the work number onto one phone and receive phone calls, and texts.

      • Jerry

        Now this makes more sense!

  • Seriously, how many people out there own more than one iPhone?

    Plus, with Apple Continuity, I can already answer calls on any device.

    • Julio Hernandez

      Some people have a work phone and their personal phone

      • “Some”

        Those “some” will become fewer and fewer every year. One-for-work-another-for-personal is becoming oldfangled and inefficient. Just like Blackberries have. Remember those ancient times? LOL

      • Scott Curry

        But back in the real world…

        This is still extremely common as employersbusinesses still have yet to take the leap into developing a BYOD policy, as it takes a LOT of decisions to be made.

        So to say ‘fewer and fewer every year’ is horribly uninformed and ignorant.

      • You’d be surprised but the real world moves and progresses a little faster than you think.

      • Scott Curry

        Considering IT is my career and I’ve worked forwith a lot of companies, I don’t think I’d be surprised…but that’s probably because I actually know what I’m talking about whereas you’re just pulling BS from the air…

      • I’m glad you wouldn’t be surprised. You just proved my point.

      • Scott Curry

        You seem to be delusional. I’ll let you do your own research, but to help, here’s keywords to Google: Bitglass bring your own device adoption rate

      • :D

        That depends hugely on the job. A lot of jobs need you to be able to take business calls; by having a separate phone, you can just turn off the work phone when you’re not working or when you’re feeling lazy. People have separate email accounts for the same reason.

    • Rowan09

      As Julio stated I have 2 phones a S7 Edge and iPhone 7 + but now I could just use my iPhone and have the number for the S7 receive calls on my iPhone.

    • Blip dude

      Nope. Believe me I put it to the test. I left my phone at home one day and simply took my iPad (which is the device I used the most), and all none iPhone calls were not received on my iPad.

      While this may be stupid to most, actually being able to receive all calls over cellular data on my iPad, regarding of how the incoming call is being made, can still be very beneficial. As of right now, my iPad is still tethered to my phone regarding non-iPhone texts and phone calls as both devices have to be under the same Wi-Fi.

    • websyndicate

      At the start up i work at everybody has 2 phones 1 work 1 personal and I need my work phone as I work in IT. When I worked at Amazon they would expect you to use your personal phone for work (easier IMO) and you could expense 50 dollars a month to the company for it.

      Having 2 phones its easier to split your life up.

    • Bugs Bunnay

      probably not many? but I do and it’s not just on iphone’s. I also got android phones just for kicks and hearing this new service brings a smile to my face 😀

  • Bugs Bunnay

    the things tmobile has been doing is unprecedented

  • :D

    O2 have had something similar for years called TU Go

  • Nathan

    AT&T had this with NumberSync. It allows me to call from my Mac and watch without having my phone on at all.

  • Woz A Nater

    If Apple would just make a dual sim device this would solve the problem and no need to pay for this service. Other countries a dual sim phone is a must because it’s cheaper to use one company for phone service and a second company for data, than combined like it is here in the US.