Pay Once Play

Apple has begun highlighting non-freemium games in a new App Store section entitled “Pay Once & Play.” The company describes the new section as an area where users can download “great games with no in-app purchases.”

As noted by MacStories, the section is divided into 3 categories: Recent Releases, Blockbuster Games and App Store Originals, and it features a wide variety of games including Minecraft, Thomas Was Alone and Threes!.

Here are a few more games listed in Pay Once & Play:

The move should appease many iOS gamers and developers who have criticized the ongoing trend of “freemium” titles. These are games that are free to download, but are littered with, and often crippled by, in-app purchases.

The promo first popped up in the UK after its weekly App Store refresh, and it will likely spread to the US and other countries later this afternoon. It’s unknown if the section is a temporary thing, or will become a permanent fixture.

Source: MacStories

  • Thomas Hopkins

    I would always go for an app purchase than an in-app purchase. Generally, buying an app is so much better value than buying 500 coins in a game that you play for 5 minutes…

    • ^Agreed!

      The only exception to this IMHO is when in-app-purchases are used as they should be used e.g. for bonus content and DLCs and not for “Give us all your money for a ton of coins”.

  • Andrew

    This is perfect! I hope this stays.

  • Digitalfeind

    I like it when localiapstore gets around those freemium games. I like buying a game with absolutely zero in-app purchases.

    • Marcus

      So you like stealing? Okay then.

      • Digitalfeind

        If YOU consider that stealing than yes, yes I do.

        Now how is it stealing??

      • Marcus

        You’re taking something that doesn’t belong to you. You’re not providing any source of payment. You’re just taking something. If you were to buy an in-app purchase, you would receive a receipt for your purchase via email. This would be verification that you bought something and didn’t steal it or take it against the merchants will.

      • Digitalfeind

        No it is not. It is the same as using a cheat code in a game. Nothing is being taken away that is already on the app. If it is stealing than using flex to get rid of ads is stealing because it takes away as revenue the same as using a pop up blocker. Those sites and games get paid for that revenue. Using a hack to get extra stuff from a game is not stealing and neither is using an in-app cracker.

      • Noah

        Using cheat codes in a game is made by the developer, they want it to be included. Say, if you hack the game or glitch the game, the developer did obviously not want that. So, if you use LocaliAPStore to crack IAP it’s not what they want (Apple, and the developer)

      • Using cheat codes in a game is made by the developer, they want it to be included. Say, if you hack the game or glitch the game, the developer did obviously not want that. So, if you use LocaliAPStore to crack IAP it’s not what they want (Apple, and the developer)

        I might be wrong but I’m pretty sure in many countries there’s legislation to mod / remix etc…

        You are free to do so unless a license or user agreement prohibits it and if developers don’t like it they either need to change legislation or better still sell their apps and games for a fee. If it’s actually worth it people will pay for it!

      • Marcus

        I agree with your response. Hacking gameplay is much different than hacking in-app purchases. You’re not exactly stealing anything if you get an aimbot hack or something like that.

      • Marcus

        It’s completely different than using a cheat code in a game. The developers are putting the cheat codes in their games as something that the consumer can do for free. It’s up to them whether they want to use it. The developer already gave them permission. The developer doesn’t intend that you buy anything in order to access the cheat code. For an in-app purchase, the developer intends that you buy the in-app purchase.

      • EDIT: Essentially, you’re taking something without the other parties consent.

        It’s more like you’re tricking the other party in to giving you what you’ve requested. You aren’t taking anything. You’re making a request and the third-party is not properly verifying the request and just responds with “Okay sure you can have the coins without giving me any money”. Developers can implement checks to verify in-app-purchases but without proper verification the developers cannot complain.

      • Marcus

        That actually clears up a lot of confusion for me. Still though, it’s sort of like stealing. It’s possible to do this in a real life scenario where you can trick the vendor and sort of steal something. If the developer really knew what was going on, they wouldn’t like it and they would say it was stealing. I understand what you mentioned though. That makes this topic a lot more interesting and it’s sort of hard for me to argue my point with that right now. Sort of mean to trick the developer like that.

  • h4nd0fg0d

    Tempo is out. Oh and it’s pure premium bad ass shit!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!