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Just as I’d suspected, Apple isn’t really partnering with Swiss watchsmiths on developing and producing multiple iWatch devices.

That’s according to Swiss watchmaker Swatch which today issued an outright denial of the rumor in the form of a statement issued to Reuters.

In it, a spokesperson categorically states that the Swatch Group is not working with Apple on iWatch devices although the company has supplied components like integrated circuits to certain mobile phone makers…

Reuters quotes a spokeswoman for Swatch Group who confirmed on Thursday that the rumor of collaboration with Apple was unfounded.

Swiss watchmaker Swatch Group has denied a media report saying it was working with technology company Apple on a smartwatch, a wearable device with interactive functions.

Swatch CEO Nick Hayek Jr. last year likened devices such as an Apple smartwatch to an “interactive terminal on your wrist.” He said such gizmos make little sense to consumers due to their tiny screens.

I can’t say I’m surprised by the Swatch Group’s firm denial.

For starters, the rumor VentureBeat posted yesterday is so out of touch with the realities of Apple’s modus operandi. Citing unnamed sources, the report states Apple and its partners will offer a family of smartwatches to suit all tastes as Apple is purportedly looking to push its platform and the Health Kit ecosystems to “millions of wrists.”

I stopped reading right there.

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Disregarding for a moment the fact that Venture Beat is not the most reliable of source when it comes to the Apple rumor business, the story was too good to be true.

More importantly, it alleged that Apple was ready to abandon its tight vertical integration for a licensing model reminiscent of its failed Mac experiment in the 1980s which nearly cost the company its very existence as it licensed the Mac to clone makers.

Did anyone in their right mind really believe Apple would renounce its simplicity, elegance and clean design for something like this?

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Tim Cook’s “Only Apple Can Do This” mantra is as strong as ever.

With that in mind, you’d be hard-pressed to argue Apple would abandon its business philosophy to let outsiders build Apple-branded hardware over which Apple wouldn’t be able to exercise tight control without risking brand dilution.