One of the biggest mysteries regarding Apple’s rumored TV set, other than whether it really exists or not, is how Apple plans to push content to the device. A major advantage of the television is expected to be its easy-to-use interface, and there’s only so much Apple could do with your everyday cable or dish connection.

In a note to investors this morning, Jeffries analyst Peter Misek laid out four ways that Apple could get around the need for a third party set top box and remote control…

Option one, as Misek explains, would be for Apple to partner with carriers and cable operators. This would put Apple’s TV set on par, as far as content goes, with the rest of its competition, but it would also be extremely difficult. There are hundreds of regional cable providers in the US alone, imagine how many there are in the world.

Misek’s next theory involves Apple going directly to the content-makers, and working with them to create custom groups of channels. Imagine being able to pick what shows, and what channels you want a la carte, instead of paying for hundreds of them that you don’t watch. And considering Apple’s clout in the entertainment industry, this could be a feasible option.

Of course, Apple could also go the Netflix route and buy rights to exclusive content. You want to watch (insert popular TV show)? You’ll need an Apple TV set. Just last month we heard a rumor that Apple could be bidding for exclusive rights to English Premier League games and events, so this option is a possibility as well.

Finally, Misek suggests that Apple could become its own studio and produce its own content. This option is about as far-fetched as they come, but hey, it could happen. With $100 billion in cash laying around, there’s not much that isn’t possible.

Apple TV rumors have been really heating up over the past few months. The set is expected to sport a number of features already available in Apple’s current iOS devices, such as Siri and FaceTime, and could launch as early as this year.

[AppleInsider]