Apple’s iPhone and iPad advertisements totally set them apart from the competition. While TV ads for Android devices spout off specs like “it has a 1.5 GHZ processor and 512 MB of RAM,” Apple’s commercials use more familiar words like “fast” and “magical.”

It’s likely that the simplistic strategy is what continues to drive hoards of customers into Apple stores to snatch up their latest gadgets. That being said, for a company known for its oversimplified approach, does their upcoming cloud service seem a bit too complicated?

While most U.S. consumers use some form of cloud computing, a new survey from the NPD Group found that only 22% of consumers are familiar with the term “cloud computing.” And as we inch closer to iCloud‘s official release, you have to wonder if it’ll succeed.

From Apple’s iCloud landing page:

“iCloud stores your music, photos, apps, calendars, documents, and more. And wirelessly pushes them to all your devices — automatically. It’s the easiest way to manage your content. Because now you don’t have to.”

Now to most of us who read tech blogs everyday, the description makes total sense. But how about to the average consumer? My 50-year old mother, who uses an iPhone daily, would likely get lost somewhere after “wirelessly pushes them to all your devices.”

Don’t get me wrong, iCloud will thrive among frequent Mac+iDevice users, because it will be the easiest way to sync content between the two. But for the majority of Apple’s newly acquired customer base, who think the iPhone is “cute” and that it “runs well,” it might be too confusing,

What do you think?