Spam emails are circulating that pose as Apple trying to sell new products, including the rumored iPhone 5. According to MacRumors, several reports have come in that talk of an “iPhone 5GS” product launch in a very Apple-like email.

Apple’s products have always been used in spam and advertising to get click-throughs, but this round of spam sets itself apart with its striking resemblance to Apple’s own design. If you’ve ever received an email from Apple, you’ll notice how similar these spam messages are to the legit ones from Cupertino…

“We’ve received a number of warnings from readers over the last couple of weeks about fraudulent emails that look a lot like official Apple emails. These emails are structured just like Apple’s promotional emails, but are actually attempts to lure unsuspecting customers into entering their Apple IDs and other personal information. Such so called “phishing” attempts are common and readers should be wary about following links from any emails.”

These iPhone 5 emails are combinations of random concept designs on the internet. If you read sites like iDB, you’re most likely informed enough to recognize that these emails are fake.

Here’s what the full email looks like:

Clicking the links in this email will ultimately lead you to a phishing and malware attack that could compromise personal data, such as, your bank account.

Similar emails also try to sell new Adobe products from Apple.

Let us know if you’ve received one of these spam emails for the iPhone 5, or anything that looks like it came from Apple. These emails are targeted towards less informed audiences that may not be able to tell the difference between a fake product launch from Apple and a real one.

What do you think? As far as spam goes, this is pretty clever.

  • Jeff caffoe

    I’ve received 2 about the iPad 2, deleted them both.

  • Daniel CG

    It’s easy to determine if it’s spam or real: Look for misspellings and other grammar errors (Iphone, iphone, instead of iPhone)

  • President Camacho

    Love the “transparent mode” LOL

  • Wim

    I received exactly the same mail today (in the Netherlands). When I clicked, a download started of a file named iPhone5GS.gif.exe.
    I deleted the file of course.