It appears that Verizon’s upcoming version of the iPhone 4 won’t have that many distinguishing factors between AT&T’s version from a hardware perspective. Spy shots revealed last week show an almost identical iPhone 4, with only subtle hints at changes with the antenna among other things.

So, how can Verizon make an even bigger splash when it unveils a phone that has been available for over half a year? According to the WSJ: offer $30 unlimited data to spite AT&T’s recent restructuring to its data plans.

If you can remember, AT&T was met with its fair share of criticism when it unveiled new tiered data pricing on the eve of the iPhone 4’s launch. AT&T no longer offers unlimited data to new subscribers; the most you can score is a $25 2 GB plan.

Now, Verizon is gearing up for what will undoubtedly be a hilarious PR campaign against its arch-rival….

Although Verizon itself has hinted at the industry’s need to shift to tiered data plans in the past, it appears that it’s prepared to eat those words, at least for a while. That way, there can be that true distinguishing factor between AT&T’s iPhone, and Verizon’s.

It’s actually an interesting predicament for all three parties, Apple included. Apple can’t really appear to be on Verizon’s side, because it still has a large partnership with AT&T. Verizon can’t call AT&T’s version of the iPhone out for its antenna deficiencies because that would make Apple look bad.

Because of these factors, it’s evident that Verizon will be willing to eat the cost of $30 unlimited data in the meantime, in an effort to mount a good PR campaign. Perhaps in the process they can lure ones away from AT&T, or at the very least, make up the minds of quite a few fence sitters.

Verizon has scheduled an event this Tuesday, which is all but confirmed to be for the announcement that customers in the US will now have another carrier option when it comes to the iPhone.

Hopefully this increased competition will mean lower prices for all involved. Does this news change your thoughts about switching?

[WSJ]