In a recent interview with Wired, Jim Zemlin, the Executive Director for Linux (yes that Linux), gave his opinion on the present and future state of the App Store. Why anyone would ever look towards Linux to give you a mobile business opinion is beyond me. However, Zemlin had a few points I’ll highlight for you.

Zemlin says that Apple’s status with the App Store is “totally within reach”. Then states that the top 10 pages are “the only ones that matter”. Already it was hard to take him seriously with this sort of rhetoric. If the App Store is so reachable, let’s have the competitor. As far as the top ten page being all the store has to offer, I won’t insult your intelligence by even offering up a defense to this lunacy.

When asked how the App Store model will change, the exec claims that developers aren’t going to pay 30% forever. Instead he claims that an “App Warehouse” will be used, servicing carrier stores. Of course he follows by saying that this will cost the dev 15-20%, and the warehouse will (conveniently) run Linux. Yes, I’m serious, he really thinks this.

Wired sort of set him straight throughout the exchange, noting that businesses want to be on the iPhone, etc. The word of mouth, and easy accessibility that is integrated into having your service or product in the App Store, is priceless. Even the Linux boss himself noted how well Apple has implemented a savvy UI into its selections.

There is much more in this piece than I cared to cover, mostly because it’s not iPhone (or even Apple) related. I will say that it seems a bit presumptuous to think that the App Store can or will be overtaken as easily as it is to say such. Fact is, most people who don’t even own a smart phone can tell you something about Apple’s App Store, or the iPhone for that matter. And Linux? Many of those same people would probably have to Google it. Whattaya think?

  • Richard Delaney

    ” If the App Store is so reachable, let’s have the competitor.”

    Have you heard of android and android marketplace, Although not on the same level of applications yet, the rate of application submission is increasing steadily.

    You may have seen in the news recently articles such as this one:

    http://chicagobreakingbusiness.com/2010/08/android-phones-outsell-iphone-in-first-half-of-2010.html

    And what are android phone’s running on ?

    A Linux base.

    I think it is biased and false to say that there is no competitor for both the iphone and the AppStore with the android user base and the android operating system going from strength to strength and bettering the iPhone in many areas.

  • Takean

    he didn’t say the top ten pages were the only ones, he said they were the only ones that matter, such as visibility. In ebay, its the same thing. The first page search…possibly the second is about all that matters for the time being to customers, and I kinda agree with this guy’s thoughts on it as well. I don’t usually dig really deep in the app store unless I’m looking for something or am bored out of my skull. Possibly also due to be looking at least once a day anyway so I usually see what is new. Either way, as far as in customer exposure, the top ten pages are probably correct.

  • Justin Grave

    Isn’t macOS based on BSD? I know this is UNIX, but we aren’t talking a crazy jump from graphical UNIX and LINUX. I think what he has to say is pretty accurate. Most times I’m not browsing the appstore spending hundreds of dollars on $hit apps. I like to look at the top apps, ones that are well reviewed.

  • Ethan

    Justin:
    I find the review system quite inaccurate. For a long time, the only time a chance to review was brought to attention was after you deleted an app. This meant only people who didn’t want it anymore were reviewing. It’s not much different now, & the obvious owner reviews are far too many.

  • Anonymous Freetard

    “Why anyone would ever look towards Linux to give you a mobile business opinion is beyond me.”

    OH GROW UP!!

    Late 90’s was all about pretending Linux didn’t exist on servers.

    Google. Amazon. Red Hat.

    2000’s was all about pretending Desktop Linux didn’t exist.

    Debian. Red Hat. Mandrake. SuSE. Gentoo. Arch. Ubuntu.

    So now the 2010’s are for pretending Linux isn’t going to dominate mobile.

    Android. Maemo. WebOS. Meego.

    Who’s gonna be pushing Meego?
    Nokia, the largest phone maker on Planet Earth.

    Give me a break.

  • Rocker Man

    Everyone I know owns an iPhone and I know no one who uses an android or a meego, whatever that is. I have awesome games, and iTunes is better than anything else. I tried a android phone (I think it was samsung something or other) at the store, and it crashed almost instantly! How is that competition? It isn’t! It’s just laughable. Have you even tried linux? What a joke. I couldn’t get it to install for ages, and then finally the gui didn’t make any sense, you had to run the command line and I couldn’t find any good games or apps at all. Wiped it right away. Why waste time on open “sores” software when you can use the best!?!?

  • phil

    Jim Zemlin is executive directer of the Linux foundation, not Linux which isn’t owned by anyone. The fundamental difference between Linux and Apple, (other than price), is that Linux is open source. If it doesn’t do exactly what you want it to do, you can change it. It is all about empowering the user, not making Billions. If Apple isn’t exactly what you want, tough. It is very illegal to tamper with. Just for the record, Mac os x and Linux both use the same shell, bash. Also, you don’t have to use the command line at all on newer Linux distro’s. If I ever fall into a gold mine I might give Apple products a chance, but I will never give up the power and freedom of Linux.

  • Justin C

    I don’t understand the negativity of this post. Linux is free and open source, so it can be easily tailored you one’s needs, as long as you know how. This seems good to me. And nobody “owns” Linux… Just because Steve Jobs wasn’t behind it some how and it doesn’t cost a ridiculous sum of money doesn’t make Linux bad. Isn’t the Android Marketplace Linux based? What’s wrong with an “App Warehouse”? Enough people have commented about the “insanity” of the first 10 pages thing, so I’ll leave that one alone. I just don’t get what your issue is.

  • trentreviso

    “Why anyone would ever look towards Linux to give you a mobile business opinion is beyond me.”

    I mean no disrespect to the author, but was that intended as a joke?

    Linux (mostly as Android) is already the best-selling smartphone OS in America. Almost certainly, it will be the best-selling worldwide within a year.